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Monday musings on Australian literature: Once more unto the breach

Monday musings on Australian literature: Once more unto the breach | IB English | Scoop.it
A little over three years ago, I wrote a Monday musings about the GAN (aka the Great Australian Novel) and the canon. I concluded with the questions: Do you think there is value to the idea of a ca...
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Humanity Hallows: Carol Ann Duffy & Friends Season 8 Finale

The night began with the customary introduction from Carol Ann Duffy, this time reading The Woman in the Moon from her 2011 Costa award winning collection The Bees, before moving into more controversial work.
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Gustave Flaubert - Madame Bovary, in Court and Cab

Gustave Flaubert - Madame Bovary, in Court and Cab | IB English | Scoop.it
Today in Literature presents Gustave Flaubert - Madame Bovary, in Court and Cab, and other stories about the great books, writers, characters, and events in literary history.
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amandaonwriting: Literary Birthday - 14 October ...

amandaonwriting: Literary Birthday - 14 October ... | IB English | Scoop.it
amandaonwriting:
“Literary Birthday - 14 October
Happy Birthday, Kate Grenville, born 14 October 1950
Nine Quotes
• Two pieces of advice: One, write out of an urge to write, not a desire to be “a...
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happy birthday to you ... etc etc

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7 Writing Lessons from Gabriel Garcia Marquez

7 Writing Lessons from Gabriel Garcia Marquez | IB English | Scoop.it

I’m finally reading One Hundred Years of Solitude, the Nobel Prize Winning novel and one of the best selling books of all time. Gabriel García Marquez’s novel about a small village in Colombia has become the best known work of magic realism, a literary genre that blends detailed realism with elements that couldn’t possibly exist.

 

There are things I like and things I don’t like about the novel, but apart from personal taste, it quickly became clear to me García Márquez is a great writer, perhaps among the best writers alive (he’s eighty-six).

In this post, we will explore seven writing lessons we can learn from the Colombian master.


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Carol Ann Duffy: UK's First Openly Gay Poet Laureate

Carol Ann Duffy: UK's First Openly Gay Poet Laureate | IB English | Scoop.it
LONDON — The centuries-old post of British poet laureate, bard to kings and queens, has been held by William Wordsworth, Alfred Lord Tennyson and Ted Hughes _ but never, until Friday, by a woman.
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100 novels everyone should read - Telegraph (Baochi's count: 28, and you?)

100 novels everyone should read - Telegraph (Baochi's count: 28, and you?) | IB English | Scoop.it

Below are the books I've read from the Telegraph's list of 100, with star ratings assigned by yours truly.

1. The Lord of the Rings by JRR Tolkien (3 out of 3 stars)

2. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee (2 1/2 stars)

3. On the Road by Jack Kerouac (2 1/2 stars)

4. The Stranger by Albert Camus (2 stars)

5. If On a Winter’s Night a Traveller by Italo Calvino (1 star)

6. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky (3 stars)

7. Dr Zhivago by Boris Pasternak (1/2 a star)

8.One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez (2 1/4 stars)

9.Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov (3 stars)

10.The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood (2 stars)

11. The Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger (3 stars)

12. Beloved by Toni Morrison (2 stars)

13. The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera (2 stars)

14. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (3 stars)

15. The Great Gatsby by F Scott Fitzgerald (3 stars)

16. Suite Francaise by Irène Némirovsky (2 stars)

17. Atonement by Ian McEwan (2 stars)

18. Tom Jones by Henry Fielding (1 1/2 stars)

19. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley (3 stars)

20. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert (2 1/2 stars)

21. 1984 by George Orwell (3 stars)

22. Tristram Shandy by Laurence Sterne (1 1/2 stars)

23. Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy (2 stars)

24. Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë (3 stars)

25. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen (3 stars)

26. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë (3 stars)

27. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad (3 stars)

28. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy (3 stars)


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brizzy's comment, February 24, 2011 12:41 AM
I've read 5 of them. *NO CLASS*
Baochi's comment, February 25, 2011 2:48 PM
brizzy, I'm a voracious reader but my tastes don't gel well with these "official" lists. To each his own, right?
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"What would Flaubert say about social media?" Tom Butler (Digiday)

"What would Flaubert say about social media?" Tom Butler (Digiday) | IB English | Scoop.it

"What would Flaubert say about social media? How about Dickinson on ad sales? Digiday's resident English literature expert explores.

 

(…) Below are some shots of unremembered pleasure that have some bearing on the digital media world.

 

The Agency Creative Process “As I am not going to milk my brains for a week, I shall here write the first pages of the greatest book in the world.” –Virginia Woolf, “A Writer’s Diary”

 

Social Media Marketing “What I would like to create is a book about nothing. … The most beautiful works are those that have the least matter; the closer expression hugs thought, the more words cleave to it and disappear, the more beautiful it is.” –Gustave Flaubert, letter, to Louise Colet

 

Attribution and ROI “So if you want to get rich quick you have either to be rich already or you must appear rich. To get rich here you’ve got to pull off something big, otherwise you’re just a petty thief, and then it’s goodbye! If among a hundred professions you might take up there are ten men who rise to the top quickly, the public calls them robbers. Draw your own conclusions. That’s the way things are. It’s no better than the kitchen, the stink is just as bad and you have to get your hands dirty if you want to cook something up; just learn how to get them clean again. That’s the only morality nowadays.” –Honore de Balzac, “Pere Goriot”

 

Native Advertising “He was not afraid of the natives. … After all, that was only a savage sight, while I seemed at one bound to have been transported into some lightless region of subtle horrors, where pure, uncomplicated savagery was a positive.” –Joseph Conrad, “Heart of Darkness”

 

Building Authentic Brands “We hope to have, before long, a board of fact, composed of commissioners of fact, who will force people to be a people of fact, and nothing but fact. You must discard the word Fancy altogether. You have nothing to do with it. You are not to have, in any object of use or ornament, what would be a contradiction in fact.” Charles Dickens, “Hard Times”

 

Impactful Advertising Activations “To blow this horn was for me a real pleasure, almost a vice. I will go further and declare that if I were obliged to record, in a roll of honour, those activities which in the course of my interminable existence have given me only a mild pain in the balls, the blowing of a rubber horn—toot!—would figure among the first.” –Samuel Beckett, “Molloy”

 

Agency Life “Futile pursuits and conversations always about the same topics take up the better part of one’s time, the better part of one’s strength, and in the end there is left a life clipped and wingless, an absurd mess, and here is no escaping or getting away from it — just as though one were in a madhouse or a prison” –Anton Chekhov, “The Lady with the Pet Dog”

 

Brand Lift “The man who makes an appearance in the business world, the man who creates personal interest, is the man who gets ahead. Be liked and you will never want.” –Arthur Miller, “Death of a Salesman”

 

Agency-Client Relations “Thou must be patient. We came crying hither. Thou know’st the first time that we smell the air We wail and cry.” –William Shakespeare, “King Lear”

 

Tom Butler is Digiday’s copy editor and a professor of English Literature at Eastern Kentucky University. @tomcopyeditor.”


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Edith Grossman on translation

Edith Grossman on translation | IB English | Scoop.it

Yale University Press launched its “Why X Matters” series in 2010, each volume designed to present “a concise argument for the continuing relevance of an important person or idea”. So far the series contains volumes on the US Constitution, architecture, poetry, the Dreyfus affair, the philosopher Hannah Arendt, and the religious thinker Reinhold Niebuhr. It also contains a volume on translation published in 2010 and written by the American literary translator Edith Grossman, who has translated such writers as Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Mario Vargas Llosa and Carlos Fuentes. Strangely, this concise book left me with the impression that Grossman was not so much answering the question as to why translation matters, but also and perhaps especially the question as to why translation matters to her. This is not a bad thing, however. On the contrary. It’s precisely because it does matter to her that she makes a convincing case for translation in general.


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