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The Weekly Wandererhttps://blu173.mail.live.com/?tid=cmRts8QTZc5BGyiQAiZMIHDg2&fid=flinbox&paid=cmvPWjP5Nc5BGpqQAiZMJDPA2&pad=2014-10-25T22%3A07%3A07.407Z&pat=2&pidx=2

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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 26, 2014 4:08 PM
Foto Friday | Gondolier Under the Rialto Bridge, Venice
Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 26, 2014 4:11 PM

The Weekly Wanderer

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Tree People L.A - Kiss The Ground Stories

Andy Lipkis, Tree People Los Angeles. Get involved and learn more at www.treepeople.org Receive our weekly tips for living regeneratively

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GPS Essentials

"GPS Essentials is the most complete GPS tool on Android Market: Navigate, manage waypoints, tracks, routes, build your own dashboard from 45 widgets."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 14, 2016 6:39 PM

GPS Essentials is a great, free app for a smart phone to create some simple, geospatial data.  Need to create a GPX file with various waypoints (that imports nicely into ArcGIS)?  Try GPS essentials (or if you only need linear data about where you've been, Map My Run works if you don't mind needing a desktop to download the GPX file). 

 

Tagsmapping, GPS, edtech, video.

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27 stunning satellite images that will change how you see our world - Geoawesomeness

27 stunning satellite images that will change how you see our world - Geoawesomeness | I've started a blog | Scoop.it

"The images come from the amazing book called “Overview: A New Perspective of Earth”. that just hit the stores around the world. The book is a stunning and unique collection of satellite images of Earth that offer an unexpected look at humanity, derived from the wildly popular Daily Overview Instagram account followed by almost 0.5 million people."

 

Hagadera, seen here on the right, is the largest section of the Dadaab Refugee Camp in Northern Kenya and is home to 100,000 refugees. To cope with the growing number of displaced Somalis arriving at Dadaab, the UN has begun moving people into a new area called the LFO extension, seen here on the left. Dadaab is the largest refugee camp in the world with an estimated total population of 400,000.


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US election 2016: Trump victory in maps

US election 2016: Trump victory in maps | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
The map above shows where Mr Trump improved on the share of the vote achieved by Mitt Romney, the Republican presidential candidate who failed to beat President Barack Obama in 2012.

 

Tags: electoral, political.


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Dakota Access Pipeline: What You Need to Know

Dakota Access Pipeline: What You Need to Know | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Conflict between Native American protesters and private security personnel over construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline has turned violent. What is the Dakota Access Pipeline?

 

Tags: industry, conflict, economic, energy, resources, environment, indigenous, ecology.


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Ex-Prisoners Move Crowd to Tears at 40th Anniversary Dinner

Denise reports from Detroit! An evening with Senator Patrick Colbeck, ministry partners and ex-prisoners gets emotional. This was an incredible 40th Anniversary appreciation dinner for the Detroit area.

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The Arctic Suicides: It's Not The Dark That Kills You

The Arctic Suicides: It's Not The Dark That Kills You | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Greenland has the world's highest suicide rate. And teen boys are at the highest risk.

 

Like native people all around the Arctic — and all over the world — Greenlanders were seeing the deadly effects of rapid modernization and unprecedented cultural interference. American Indians and Alaska Natives (many of whom share Inuit roots with Greenlanders) had already seen many of their communities buckle under the same pressures.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 22, 2016 4:01 AM

This is an incredibly tragic story; if I could add one word to the sub-title, it would read, "It's not JUST the dark the kills you."  I'm not an environmental determinist, but we can't pretend that the climate/darkness don't play some role in Greenland having 6x the suicide rates of the United States.  See also this article/photo gallery about a similar suicide problem in the indigenous far north of Canada.    

 

Tags: Greenland, Arctic, genderpodcast, indigenous.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 10, 2017 12:03 PM
Seth Dixon's insight: This is an incredibly tragic story; if I could add one word to the sub-title, it would read, "It's not JUST the dark the kills you." I'm not an environmental determinist, but we can't pretend that the climate/darkness don't play some role in Greenland having 6x the suicide rates of the United States. See also this article/photo gallery about a similar suicide problem in the indigenous far north of Canada.
Mr Mac's curator insight, August 11, 2017 1:58 AM
Unit 1 - Human-Environment Interaction; Unit 3 - Culture 
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Surging Seas Interactive Map

Surging Seas Interactive Map | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Global warming has raised global sea level about 8" since 1880, and the rate of rise is accelerating. Rising seas dramatically increase the odds of damaging floods from storm surges.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 2016 6:27 PM

This interactive map from Climate Central dramatically shows what locations are most vulnerable to sea level rise.  You can adjust the map to display anywhere from 1 to 10 feet of sea level rise to compare the impact to coastal communities.  This dynamic map lets to view other layers to contextualize potential sea level rise by toggling on layers that include, population density, ethnicity, income, property and social vulnerability.   

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, climate change, environment, resources, watercoastalmapping, visualization, environment depend, political ecology.

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Davontae Sanford voices frustration over lack of charges against former officer #DavontaeSanford #Exonerate #WrongfullyConvicted

Davontae Sanford voices frustration over lack of charges against former officer #DavontaeSanford #Exonerate #WrongfullyConvicted | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
This has been a hard week for Davontae Sanford. Sanford, you may remember, spent nearly nine years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit. But this week,

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Where's the best country to die?

Where's the best country to die? | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Palliative care varies dramatically around the globe but the United Kingdom tops the list, says Baroness Finlay, the chairwoman of the National Council for Palliative Care

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Organic Farming on One Acre or Less

Organic Farming on One Acre or Less | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Organic farming is possible even with a small piece of land.

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A Great Idea

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Senegal's Great Green Wall combats desertification

"A 7,000 km barrier is being built along the footsteps of the Sahara to stop the desert expanding. The Great Green Wall project started in 2007 in Senegal, along with 10 countries in Africa to combat the effects of climate change. Al Jazeera’s Nicolas Haque reports from Widou, deep in the Sahel."


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Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 1, 2:34 AM
This “Green Wall” was originally supposed to span the southern border of the Sahara from the east to west coast of Africa. It was made up of trees and elements of forests in order to prevent the desert from expanding and reducing the amount of land available for food production. This seems like it would be a great idea that would work well, but the plan has some flaws. In the early stages of building up the barrier, nomadic herders are supposed to be prohibited from using the land, as their cattle would destroy it. However, the system in place in Somolia sees only one soldier guarding hundreds of kilometers by himself. The nomadic people are often desperate for food, so they often try to break in and sometimes resort to violence. This is problematic because it defeats the purpose of the barrier in increasing the farm land. Many of the countries in along the “Green Wall” do not maintain it as well as they should and Nigeria actually abandoned the project all together. For this reason many ecologists believe the effort is a waste and the climate change can not be stopped. But the efforts of the Somalians has paid off. Crops such as grapefruit and watermelon have been grown in areas that would have been unsuitable for such crops a few years ago. Migratory European birds also settle in the area during the winter. Another benefit that comes from the Wall is that nomads are not forced to join terrorist organizations as their only sources for food, because farming is made easier in the Sahel. 
tyrone perry's curator insight, April 5, 8:12 PM
The great green wall is a man made ecological wall from the Atlantic ocean thru 10 countries to the red sea.  This is to prevent the desert from expanding, but also it is protected from nomadic herders, and loss of food.  This project still has a long way to go but ha not been completely abandoned yet. 
Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 21, 3:12 PM
Although Senegal is one of the few countries in the Sahel to actually follow through on its promise of building its green wall, it may be fruitless in the long run. The expansion of desert regions seems relentless. However, what is most surprising is how rapidly the ecosystems have changed and the crops that can be grown there. Watermelon, grapefruit, and European migratory songbirds have all taken hold, drastically altering the agriculture and environment of the region. 
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WORKSHEETS: Climate Migrants

WORKSHEETS: Climate Migrants | I've started a blog | Scoop.it

"The ESRI storymap on climate refugees does a phenomenal job sampling locations in the world that experience migration effects as a result of climate change. Attached is a guided worksheet that accompanies the ESRI Climate Migrant Storymap."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 2017 3:04 PM

This StoryMap shows some key regions where migrants are fleeing some of the negative impacts of climate change and one APHG teacher has created a fabulous worksheet to guide students through this great resource.   

 

TagsAPHG, climate changemigrationrefugees, environment, coastalmappingESRIStoryMap, political ecology.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, January 26, 2017 7:51 PM
Geographic Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends, Interrelationships, Geographic Perspective
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NY Parole Board Regulations Should Focus Primarily On Risk & Needs Assessments

Organizer Laura Whitehorn says that the reasons to release aging prisoners are not only financial, but also ethical Visit http://therealnews.com for mor

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Iceland's Glacial Melt and Geothermal Activity

Iceland's Glacial Melt and Geothermal Activity | I've started a blog | Scoop.it

Glacial melting and flooding occurs every year by the Skafta River in Iceland. As the water travels down towards the North Atlantic Ocean, incredible patterns are created on the hillsides. Rising lava, steam vents, or newly opened hot springs can all cause this rapid ice melt, leading to a sizable release of water that picks up sediment as it flows down from the glaciers.

 

Tags: geomorphology, physical, Europe, fluvial, water, landforms, images.


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Introducing ISIS

"The invasion of Iraq was supposed to turn the country into a democracy that posed no threat to the United States, or the rest of the world. Thirteen years later, Iraq has collapsed into three warring states. A third of the country is controlled by ISIS, who have also taken huge amounts of territory in Syria. VICE correspondent Ben Anderson gains exclusive access to the three front lines in Iraq, where Sunni, Shiite and Kurdish forces are fighting for their lives. Anderson visits with the Russian military forces in Syria, meets captured ISIS fighters in Kurdistan, and interviews US policymakers about how the situation in Iraq spun out of control."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 13, 2016 7:15 PM

Many young students are especially baffled at how a terrorist organization can seize control of large chunks of territory.  If you are looking for a good video introduction that explains how and why ISIS was able to gain power and than gain and maintain territory, this is it (it's classroom safe despite the source). 

 

Tags: Syria, war, conflict, political, geopolitics, Iraq, devolution, terrorism, ISISMiddle East.

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How To Get A Country To Trust Its Banks

How To Get A Country To Trust Its Banks | I've started a blog | Scoop.it

"It's something you can see on every block in most major cities. You probably see one every day and never give give it a second thought. But in Yangon, Myanmar in 2013, an ATM was a small miracle. For decades, Myanmar was cut off from the rest of the world. There were international sanctions, and no one from the U.S. or Europe did business there."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 5, 2016 6:27 PM

We often assume that one form of technology, a system, institute should work equally well where ever it is.  But the nuances of cultural geography mediate how societies interact with technological innovations, and as demonstrated in this Planet Money podcast, "People in Myanmar (Burma) were reluctant to use ATMs because they didn't trust the banks. They weren't sure that the machines would actually give them their money."  

 

Tags: Burma, Southeast Asia, poverty, development, economicpodcast.

Richard Aitchison's curator insight, April 11, 2:11 PM
We often take for granted our infrastructe and in this case our banking system. Have we seen recessions, yes , have we seen our banks fail yes, but to not trust them at all well thats another story. In pretty much every American city and most major cities around the world ATMs are very common. I am pretty sure most of us have used an ATM at least once if not all of the time. So when the small country of Myanmar had its sanctions lifted and VISA and Mastecard had the opportunity to put in ATMs they went for it and thought it would be a great ooportunity. They did forsee what would happen though. Myanmar citizens had almost no confidence in their banking system thus most people just kept their money at home with them. So since they did not have money in the banks they did not need to use the ATMs. Its very important for companies, even big ones such as Visa and Mastercard, to understand the market and the culture of the population in which they are setting up the business. If Visa and Mastercard had done a little more research they might have foreseen this problem. In this ever global world it is important for businesses to remain culuturally aware or risk losing mililons.  For start up companies or investment companies it becomes even more important as they do market research as well.
brielle blais's curator insight, May 3, 8:33 PM
This showcases how different cultures in different places really are. The idea of credit cards in Myanmar isn't exactly greeted with positivity. Most people are skeptical of the banks and keep their money at home instead. This way of living seems so different to people from places like the US because Myanmar doesn't have and connection to the US with institutions such as banks and atm. However this way of running a country does not allow for anything to be fixed, which is why is it so rugged, with cars with no floors, awful roads, and anything else that a bank would normally help fund. 
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Trailer: One Day on Earth

"One Day on Earth is a unique global movement, community media creation platform, and collaborative film production engine. We invite you to join our international community of thousands of filmmakers, hundreds of schools, and dozens of non-profits, and contribute to this unique global project (with a map of all participants). Many future filming events will be announced in the coming year. One Day on Earth is a community that not only watches, but participates."

 

Tags: video, mapping, social media, place, culture.


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Lawsuit claims Pamela Smart was wrongly placed in solitary confinement

Lawsuit claims Pamela Smart was wrongly placed in solitary confinement | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
A new lawsuit claims that Pamela Smart was wrongly put into solitary confinement after a prison guard found a plastic cake knife in her cell.

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Old Mexico lives on

Old Mexico lives on | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
On February 2nd 1848, following a short and one-sided war, Mexico agreed to cede more than half its territory to the United States. An area covering most of present-day Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah, plus parts of several other states, was handed over to gringolandia. The rebellious state of Tejas, which had declared its independence from Mexico in 1836, was recognised as American soil too. But a century and a half later, communities have proved more durable than borders. The counties with the highest concentration of Mexicans (as defined by ethnicity, rather than citizenship) overlap closely with the area that belonged to Mexico before the great gringo land-grab of 1848. Some are recent arrivals; others trace their roots to long before the map was redrawn. They didn’t jump the border—it jumped them.

 

Tags: culture, demographics, North America, historical, colonialism, borders, political.


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Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 10, 2017 11:51 AM
I say it all the time, culture does not respect boarders. 
Nicole Canova's curator insight, February 10, 1:15 AM
Up until 170 years ago, a large portion of what is now the United States was actually controlled by Mexico.  Remarkably, this is still reflected in the ethnic makeup of the population of that area, which covers all or part of 8 states (all of California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas, and part of Colorado and Wyoming).  Political borders may determine citizenship, but they are by no means a hard division of ethnicity or culture.
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The Buried Catchphrase of Classic Hollywood

“The phrase 'Free, white, and 21' appeared in dozens of movies in the ‘30s and ‘40s, a proud assertion that positioned white privilege as the ultimate argument-stopper. It was a catchphrase of the decade, as blandly ubiquitous as any modern meme: a way for white America to check its own privilege and feel exhilarated rather than finding fault.  Read more about the history of the phrase here."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 7, 2016 7:44 PM

I found this glimpse into the American past as startling, even if it shouldn't be.  It jarred me because today many in America bristle or are startled at the notion that 'white privilege' exists today even if there are countless examples that we do not live in a post-racial society.  This glimpse of old-school Hollywood shows how asserting white privilege was common place in the lexicon--equally fascinating is how we've pretended that it never was.  White privilege is no longer flouted in polite company like it once was, but that doesn't mean that it isn't real.    

 

Tags: racecultural normslanguage, racism, culture, unit 3 culture.

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A simple choice between two gorgeous photos reveals your personality

A simple choice between two gorgeous photos reveals your personality | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Introvert or extrovert? A quick photo quiz could reveal it all.

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Great photos for an introvert 

or extrovert

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 31, 2015 2:44 AM

This psychology study found that introverts and extroverts prefer different landscapes for their vacations, and they may even seek out different environments for a home. There are many geographic implications to this idea, and I'm still chewing on them.

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Why is EU free movement so important?

Why is EU free movement so important? | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Where did the idea of free movement of people come from? The precursor to the EU was formed as European leaders came together in the wake of the Second World War, wanting to prevent another catastrophic war. The idea was that allowing people to move across the continent - from countries where there were no jobs to countries where there were labour shortages - would not only boost European growth, but would help prevent war by getting people to mix more across borders.

"The founding fathers of the European Community wanted it to be a construct that also had a political integration and for that you needed people to move because the minute people crossed boundaries and borders, you had deeper integration… So it was both a social as well as an economic aim.


Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, mobility, political, states, migration.


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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 11:57 AM

Immigration is a major source of tension within Europe. The influx of immigrants into Europe has led to a nativist backlash in many nations. The free movement of people is a bedrock principle of the European Union. In the aftermath of the Second World War, the leaders of Europe hoped that the open borders policy would  prevent another costly war by allowing people to move to were there were jobs were located. The mixing of cultures would also prevent war. People would develop an understanding of other cultures, which would make the possibility of war more remote. The leaders did not account for the strong nativist strand that often runs through many nations. The UK is threating to withdraw from the EU over this immigration issue. While immigration on the United States gets much of the attention, a more serous crises is actually occurring in Europe.