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How we learn and our strategies to achieve learning
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Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Leadership Lite
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The Leader as Coach: 3 Times When Coaching Is Not the Answer

The Leader as Coach: 3 Times When Coaching Is Not the Answer | Education and Training | Scoop.it

In a couple of my recent posts I’ve talked about managers using coach-like skills in their conversations with direct reports. Doing this often makes conversations more impactful and effective.

But there are times when using a coaching style is not appropriate—when, in fact, it can be counterproductive and cause the other person to become frustrated.


Via Roger Francis, Kevin Watson
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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, September 1, 9:03 PM
The Leader as Coach: 3 Times When Coaching Is Not the Answer
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Learning At Work
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How to Master Employee Coaching in 3 Simple Steps

How to Master Employee Coaching in 3 Simple Steps | Education and Training | Scoop.it

Learning and development is one of the most important strategies a company can have, but it often gets forgotten or put on the back burner.


Via Roger Francis
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Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Cool School Ideas
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Why Do Teachers Need Instructional Coaches?

Why Do Teachers Need Instructional Coaches? | Education and Training | Scoop.it

 

According to Jim Knight, someone I work with as an instructional coaching trainer, up to 90% of what teachers learn alongside coaches will be retained. This means, that unlike traditional professional development where Knight's research shows that teachers lose 90% of what they learn, coaching can provide an enormous impact.


Via Gust MEES, Cindy Riley Klages
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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 12, 2016 3:36 AM

Instructional Coaching


According to Jim Knight, someone I work with as an instructional coaching trainer, up to 90% of what teachers learn alongside coaches will be retained. This means, that unlike traditional professional development where Knight's research shows that teachers lose 90% of what they learn, coaching can provide an enormous impact.

Knight's work is highly respected, and is highly respectful of teachers. Instructional coaching, in Knight's research and philosophy, is about working in partnership with teachers where the learning is reciprocal on the part of the teacher and coach. After all, we can learn a lot from one another.

In order for coaching to work properly, the school has to have a climate conducive to learning, which means that there needs to be a balance between risk-taking and rule following.  It also means that teachers need to be able to trust that the coaching-teaching relationship will be confidential, something Knight believes both parties should come to an agreement on before the coaching relationship even begins.


Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Coaching




Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Learning At Work
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Improve Your Coaching Skills by Understanding the Psychology of Feedback

Improve Your Coaching Skills by Understanding the Psychology of Feedback | Education and Training | Scoop.it

Do you ever wonder why it’s so difficult to give and receive feedback in the workplace? Many owners and managers struggle with pointing out areas of improvement for their employees. Employees, in turn, often have a hard time hearing they aren’t performing up to standards or that some areas of their work could be better.

While feedback can be a complicated subject, it’s also a necessary one. Why? Because effective and honest feedback is key to an engaged workplace. In a survey, 77% of the workplaces with the highest employee engagement were those that employed a consistent method of feedback.


Via Roger Francis
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Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Professional Communication
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4 Reasons Great Leaders Don't Need to Criticize

4 Reasons Great Leaders Don't Need to Criticize | Education and Training | Scoop.it

I have a fundamental belief about the kind of people I try to employ. And that's that they're going to be harder on themselves than I'll ever need to be. I also believe that the concept of constructive criticism is overrated, if not an outright fallacy. Your employees are either aware of problems with their performance, or they're not.

 

The best way to find out which category they're in is through asking questions and listening. Let's look at some of the reasons this passive approach to problem-solving is good for both of you.


Via The Learning Factor, Rosário Durão
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Adele Taylor's curator insight, November 16, 2016 5:11 PM
Perfect read for all leaders/mentors/managers
starbutane's comment, November 19, 2016 1:35 AM
Nice one
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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How to Be a Better Coach, According to Neuroscience

How to Be a Better Coach, According to Neuroscience | Education and Training | Scoop.it

Sure, running a business is about maximizing the bottom line, but few entrepreneurs care only about the dollars and cents. For most, going into work every day is also about making the world a slightly better place and helping your team get better at what they do.

 

In other words, most business owners aspire to be not just managers but coaches.

 

How do you learn to be a great coach?


Via The Learning Factor
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Steve Bavister's curator insight, May 4, 2015 3:17 AM

Understanding the function of the brain is essential if you want to be effective as a coach


Bruno V Gallo's curator insight, August 3, 2015 10:35 AM

A new study finds that great coaches don't focus on finding and fixing their team's weaknesses. They do this instead.

Diane Jackson's curator insight, July 24, 4:00 AM
The more we learn about neuroscience the better our ability to assist our learners on their learning journey!