Humanities Resource Assignment
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Humanities Resource Assignment
EEO210 Primary Humanities, Societies And Environments - Assignment 1
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Kew Traffic School Excursion

Kew Traffic School Excursion | Humanities Resource Assignment | Scoop.it

1. What students could learn from this resource.
(VELS/AusVELS level and learning focus statement).

VELS Civics & Citizenship Level 1
Learning focus statements from VELS:
They are introduced to the idea of the classroom being a community and they learn about respect and concern for others and being fair.

They begin to compare classroom and family rules and other rules they know about…

Students explore their responsibilities and rights and those of others in familiar contexts such as the family, the classroom, the school playground and local recreational areas.

2. How and why the resource would be used in the classroom for HSE learning (Prep – Year 2).
This excursion would take place as part of a Civics & Citizenship unit of study.
Before the excursion the students would have worked on creating class rules, school rules, home rules and then looked at what rules there are within the community.
The class would investigate why rules are necessary. This would stem into a discussion on laws and how these are different from rules.
This is when they would go on the excursion – they would attend the Kew Traffic School safety education program and spend the day at the venue.
The follow up to this lesson would be to discuss any new laws we learnt and look further into other laws (not traffic related) and where else laws might apply to the children.

3. A brief description of how your resource/activity responds to and aspect or aspects of the readings for that week

This resource contributes to educating children on the importance of rules and laws and why it is essential to obey and respect them. Kennedy (2000) puts forward the question ‘how can both students and teachers be prepared to value the democratic tradition they have inherited in this country?’ As educators we are faced with this challenge of not just teaching the children what is right and wrong but also ensuring they have the knowledge to know that our society is run in a way that ensures safety and equality. Kennedy (2000) also adds that ‘civics is engagement in issues and ideas that fundamentally affect the way we live. To teach civics effectively teachers themselves must be engaged in these issues’. We must not teach civics as a stand-alone subject but must incorporate it into our methods and constantly model appropriate behavior. The Kew Traffic School excursion will highlight why rules and laws are necessary, the potential severity of not following the rules and why it is important to be respectful of others. 

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If you're happy & you know it (Aussie Version) written by P. Crumble

If you're happy and you know it - lyrics

If you’re happy and you know it song (Aussie Edition)
Written by P. Crumble
Performed by Colin Buchanan

If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands.
If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands.
If you’re happy and you know it,
Then you really should just show it…
If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands!

If you’re a possum and you know it, climb a tree.*

If you’re a wombat and you know it, dig a hole.*

If you’re a bandicoot and you know it, twitch your nose.*

If you’re a wallaby and you know it, bounce around.*

If you’re a galah and you know it, flap your wings.*

If you’re a goanna and you know it, stick out your tongue.*

If you’re a kookaburra and you know it, laugh out loud.*

If you’re a dingo and you know it, scratch your fleas.*

If you’re a crocodile and you know it, snap your fangs.*

If you’re a Tassie Devil and you know it, let out a growl.*

If you’re an echidna and you know it, spike your hair.*

If you’re a koala and you know it, fall asleep.*

If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands.
If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands.
If you’re happy and you know it,
Then you really should just show it…
If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands!

* Each verse is repeated as the first one is.

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Original Girl (Mari Miyay) – Virtual Book Written by Michelle Witheyman-Crump & Vicky Duncan

Original Girl (Mari Miyay) – Virtual Book Written by Michelle Witheyman-Crump  & Vicky Duncan | Humanities Resource Assignment | Scoop.it

http://www.slq.qld.gov.au/find/virtualbooks/atsi

1.What students could learn from this resource.
(VELS/AusVELS level & learning focus statement)


VELS Humanities & Civics and Citizenship Level 2
Learning focus statements from VELS:
- [Students] begin to grasp the role and importance of the various cultural groups that make up the Australian community, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.
- They explore what their local area may have looked like before European settlement
- They begin to appreciate the similarities and differences between individuals and groups, including language, cultural and religious groups that make up the Australian nation.

2. How and why the resource would be used in the classroom for HSE learning (Prep – Year 2)
I would use this virtual book as an introduction to an Indigenous Perspectives unit of study. It would be played through the interactive whiteboard with the narration running.
I would use the book to introduce the students to indigenous Australians and the different cultures, languages, beliefs and how their traditional ways of living differ from how we live today.
The class would then split into groups to look at hunting & the boomerang, traditional food and medicine and how Australia was split into tribes rather than states. These groups would rotate.
The follow up lesson on this book would be to look at how indigenous Australians live today and what indigenous Australians have become famous or well known.

3. A brief description of how your resource/activity responds to an aspect or aspects of the reading for that week.

 This resource captures some basic cultural differences of traditional indigenous Australia. It demonstrates a sense of then and now as well as introducing new language. Price (2008) states that one goal of education is to ensure ‘all students understand and acknowledge the value of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures to Australian society’. Although we must respect and recognize cultural traditions of Indigenous Australians, it is important to avoid only speaking about a traditional way of life. By recognizing these traditions and how they have translated into our way of living today we are embracing indigenous culture and respecting Indigenous Australians for who they are today. Through this book students are able to begin to comprehend cultural differences and become accepting that these difference still shape Australia today.

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Save Our World - YouTube Video

Save Our World - YouTube Video | Humanities Resource Assignment | Scoop.it

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bn8R_XqjjI0&feature=related

 

1.What students could learn from this resource.

(VELS/AusVELS level and learning focus statement).

 

VELS Humanities Level 2

Learning focus statements from VELS: 

-Students are introduced to the concept of resources and their management, and begin to understand how resource use reflects community interdependence and economic sustainability.

 -They begin to understand how local resources are used to make products which meet local people’s needs and the needs of people in other places.

 

2. How and why the resource would be used in the classroom of HSE learning (Prep – Year)

I would use the YouTube clip to begin a unit on Sustainability.

I would use it to introduce the concepts of meeting our current needs without compromising the future resources.

The class would watch this video as a whole group and then discuss what they learnt from the video.

I would make a list on the interactive whiteboard of all the ways in which the children can think to be more aware of sustainability at school and at home. This would then be displayed in the classroom.

When students have access to the computers and iPads they will play the recycling game on the Earth Hour Website.

The class would then all work together to create posters promoting sustainability throughout the school – for example please turn off the heater and lights when leaving the room. They  would also look at what else can be done to create a sustainable future – for example plant trees and recycling.

The follow up lesson from this class would  them work towards National Tree Day where the whole class leaves the school and plants trees.

 

3. A brief description of how your resource/activity responds to an aspect or aspects of the readings for that week.

This video resource showcases a basic level of understanding of what is happening to the world in regards to global warming, and what humans can do to work towards a sustainable future. The simplicity of the video so clearly conveys what the students can contribute and how they can spread their knowledge. Cutter-Mackenzie(2011) responds negatively to the concept of ‘children as catalysts for sustainable change’ and argues that ‘children are not going to grow into the adults who will be able to solve the world’s problems.’ The problem with this argument is that while it is unlikely that every child will go on to save the world by eradicating pollution or discovering a sustainable resource, there will be children that take an interest in sustainability. Cutter-Mackenzie (2011) states that children only understand ‘problems that are engaged with and ready to consider solutions for’ however this is a gross underestimation of a child’s capabilities. We can say with certainty that if we do not educate children on sustainability then they will never be aware of their environmental impact, but if we educate then in a way that is simple and clear then the possibility of them becoming active and enthusiastic participants in creating a sustainable future is high.


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References

Boroondara, ‘Kew traffic school’, retrieved 20th May 2012, http://www.boroondara.vic.gov.au/residents/kew-traffic-school/safety-education-program


Cousins, S 2006, ‘What does it mean to be Australian?’ Issues in Society, vol. 230, pp. 15-17.


Cutter-Mackenzie, A 2011, 'Teaching for environmental sustainability', Cengage Learning, vol. 4, pp. 348-363.



Earth Hour, ‘Pocoyo’s recycling game’, viewed 10th May 2012, http://www.earthhour.org/page/fun-stuff/pocoyo-game



Kennedy, K 2010, 'Civics education for the 'Techno' generation: What should we expect young people to know and be able to do as future citizens?', Ethos, vol. 8 no. 2.


Muller, W 2006, The Contribution of 'Cultural Literacy' to the 'Globally Engaged Curriculum' and the 'Globally Engaged Citizen', The Social Educator, Brisbane.


National Tree Day 2012, ‘About national tree day’, viewed 8th May 2012, http://treeday.planetark.org/


Price 2008, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander studies, Part 4 Issues, pp.363 – 387.


Rudner, J 2010, Children's unsupervised outdoor activity: managing risk and encouraging independence, Journeys, p. 19.


Victorian Essential Learning Standards 2009, Learning focus, viewed 2nd May 2012, http://vels.vcaa.vic.edu.au/



Welch, M 2011, 'Supporting the 'Asia' cross-curriculum priority in the Australian Curriculum', Primary & Middle Years Educator, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 19-23.

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Safety House Incursion

Safety House Incursion | Humanities Resource Assignment | Scoop.it

1. What student could learn from this resource.
(VELS/AusVELS level & learning focus statement).


VELS Humanities Level 1
Learning focus statements from VELS:

-[Students] investigate the relative location, direction and distance of their home, school, classroom, local parks, shops and other significant features of their environment and begin to understand the geography of their local area.
-They learn to give and follow simple directions, and describe location relative to other people and places using everyday spatial terms such as front/back, up/down, right/left, near/far, above/below.
- They draw simple pictorial maps from their developing mental maps of familiar environments.

2. How and why the resource would be used in the classroom for HSE learning (Prep – Year 2).
I would use this incursion as part of a Living Locally unit of study.
The class would have already been looking at family timelines and concept of chronology and sequencing.
The incursion would be used as a beginning point to start looking at relative location, direction and distance.
The class would attend the incursion and learn about what a safety house is and where they can be found near the school.
After the incursion, as a whole class we would use a map of the local area that I had prepared earlier on the interactive whiteboard and the students would have to come up and move a safety house symbol to the correct location on the interactive map.
They would then each get a smaller version of the map that I had printed off and they would have to draw the safety houses and any other significant features of the environment – for example parks, their houses etc.
As a follow up to this lesson we would investigate distances on these maps and develop skills to draw simple mental maps.

3. A brief description of how your resource/ activity responds to an aspect or aspects of the readings for that week.

This resource creates an opportunity to not only look at the local area and identify places of importance; it also aids the teacher in maintaining student safety. Rudner (2010) states that ‘educators must manage changing perceptions of risk involved in events on the boundaries of school’s responsibilities, such as arrangements surrounding school pick-up and drop-off, and the age and geographical boundaries of care for children who walk or cycle to and from school on their own’. By creating student awareness of safety houses and teaching the skill to create mental maps and remember directions, we are educating students on relative location, direction and distance, as well as creating a community system where the children feel protected. This is important as ‘children have less unsupervised outdoor activity than in the past’ (Rudner, 2010). We must take care not to frighten the students away from the desire to have that unsupervised time as it is an essential act which helps the child to develop their ‘capacities for independent activity’ (Rudner, 2010).


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If you're happy and you know it (Aussie Version) Written by P. Crumble

If you're happy and you know it (Aussie Version) Written by P. Crumble | Humanities Resource Assignment | Scoop.it

1. What students could learn from this resource.
(VELS/AusVELS Level & learning focus statement).


VELS Humanities Level 2
Learning Focus statements from VELS:
…students become aware of the various types of geographical and historical evidence. They begin to make basic comparisons between ‘then’ and now’…

By observing the characteristics of different places, and prompted questions, students think about environmental differences, locally and in other parts of Australia and they world. And why these differences exist.

2. How and what the resource would be used in the classroom for HSE learning (Prep – Year 2)
I would use the song in a Living in Australia unit. It would not be used as an introduction into the unit as a whole but as an introduction into looking at Australian animals.
I would display the lyrics of the song on the interactive whiteboard and get the children to sing along to it. We would work on it each day for a week and add actions for each of the animals. We may present it at assembly.
The children would then split into groups. 1 group would play and Australian animals board game that looks at the lifecycle of a koala, kangaroo and wombat joey, another group would look at identifying mammals, marsupials and monotremes and the final group would use arts and crafts to create Australian animal models.
The follow up to this lesson would be to look at which animals were endangered or extinct and investigate why this was they case and what humans were contributing to this. The topic would then lead into an excursion to Healesville Sanctuary.

3. A brief description of how your resource/activity responds to an aspect or aspects of the readings for that week.

This resource showcases the animals that are unique to Australia. Cousins (2006) asks the question, ‘what does it mean to be Australian in a multicultural society?’ To be Australian cannot be aligned with being of Angelo-Celtic decent living a stereotypical Australian lifestyle. Australia is now such a multicultural country and rather than align our nationality with personal stereotypes and traits we should look to Australia’s unique qualities to define ourselves. What it is to be Australian is becoming lost in this sea of multiculturalism yet it is still important for all Australians to be able to identify with their country. Cousins (2006) adds ‘perhaps ideas of civic values and a renewed appreciation of our interconnectedness through local communities will reinvigorate ideas of national identity’. Children need to learn about what animals, traditions, places and cultures make Australian unique to be able to feel proud of their nationality and appreciate the ideas that shape their country and themselves. Through this song they can begin to explore what animals are special to Australia and be introduced to the concepts of how the animals have changed as the environment has.

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Origami Fun - Website

Origami Fun - Website | Humanities Resource Assignment | Scoop.it

http://www.origami-fun.com/origami-for-kids.html

1. What students could learn from this resource.
(VELS/AusVELS level and learning focus statement).


VELS Civics and Citizenship Level 2
Learning focus statement from VELS:

[Students] identify the range of groups to which they, their family members and their class belong. They begin to appreciate the similarities and differences between individuals and groups, including the language, cultural and religious groups which make up the Australian nation.

2. How and why the resource would be used in the classroom for HSE learning (Prep – Year 2).
I would use the Origami website as a resource for the Asian Perspectives unit of study.
It would be used as an introduction to a lesson that focuses on Asian art form.
The class would first brainstorm and discuss any ideas they currently had about various Asian forms of art.
The website would then be displayed either through the interactive whiteboard or on the class iPads and each student would make an origami shape.
Once the origami was made we would discuss origami facts as a class – for example where it originated. Each child would then have to write one fact about origami on their origami for display.

The lesson following this would be to move onto Asian food and traditional dress.

3. A brief description of how your resource/activity responds to an aspect/aspects of the readings for that week.

This resource focuses very specifically on Asian art forms. It is valuable for early primary students to apprehend that Asia has so much influence on Australia and that we should embrace the cultural differences and recognize that they are significant in shaping Australia. Welch (2011) states that ‘An understanding of Asia underpins the capacity of Australian students to be active and informed citizens working together to build harmonious local, regional and global communities, and build Australia's social, intellectual and creative capital’. To appreciate Asia for its creative influences is equally as important as respecting their language and cultures. By teaching why origami is made we begin to introduce basic concepts of important traditions and beliefs and how there are people within Australia that share these views. This then draws in any knowledge that children with different backgrounds can bring to the classroom and feel included and important. Welch (2011) highlights the importance of creating an inclusive environment by stating ‘Students develop intercultural understanding as they learn to understand themselves in relation to others. Students learn to respect and appreciate their own cultures and beliefs and those of others, and to engage with people of diverse cultures in ways that recognise differences and create connections between people’.


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Mirror

Mirror | Humanities Resource Assignment | Scoop.it

1. What students could learn from this resource.
(VELS/AusVELS level & learning focus statement).

VELS Humanities Level 1 & 2
Learning focus statements from VELS:

Level 1
..by seeing and hearing about other places outside their experience they begin to consider how and why other times and places are different from their own.
Level 2
By observing the characteristics of different places, and prompted by questions, students think about environmental differences, locally and in other parts of Australia and the world, and why these differences exist.

2. How and why the resource would be used in the classroom for HSE learning (Prep – Year 2).

I would use this picture storybook as an introduction into a unit of Global Education.
I would talk through the book with the whole class to introduce the concept of people all over the world living in different ways.
After reading the book I would discuss as a class any different cultures or traditions that the students already know about or have been a part of. I would use the interactive whiteboard to document these ideas.
Students would then split into small groups to complete activities on traditional dress, traditional food and famous landmarks around the world. These activities would be based around some art and craft activates to replicate patterns and designs of the traditional dress, looking at pictures of food and deciding which country they belong to and then sticking pictures of landmarkson a large map of the world where they belong.
The students would rotate through these three activities, 1 activity per week and each week I would add to the initial list of what we know about different cultures and traditions. As a follow up lesson we would begin to look at the different traditions and celebrations.

3. A brief description of how your resource/activity responds to an aspect or aspects of the reading for that week.

This book visually represents the notion of culture and demonstrates to students that different countries have different ways of life. Muller (2006) states that ‘the globally, culturally literate person should be aware that there are probably some “cultural universals” which assist in defining all cultures and hence be appreciative of the significance of this implication in that such universals are at the heart of defining what it is to be human’. This book clearly articulates that throughout the world humans undertake similar routines on a day-to-day basis, yet these routines look so different due to the cultural differences of the countries. To introduce such a concept allows students to develop interest in why these places are different and what drives cultural variances. Through the development of these thought processes, students become ‘globally engaged citizens’ (Muller, 2006). Mirror offers an introduction to a simple global perspective that allows these thoughts to develop.


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