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White Fragility: Why It's So Hard to Talk to White People About Racism -

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard to Talk to White People About Racism - | HumanGeo | Scoop.it
Dr. Robin DiAngelo explains why white people implode when talking about race.
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Title 3: Inner conflict & 'white fragility':  triggered when socially reinforced racial interests & perspectives are challenged.
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These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital

These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital | HumanGeo | Scoop.it

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.


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Alisha Meyer's curator insight, March 24, 2016 9:04 AM
Our world is changing, that is inevitable.  It's how we decide to use the technology and knowledge we now have to better ourselves or destroy ourselves.
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, January 18, 7:46 PM

This chart is pretty straight forward, yet it clearly lays out the difference between 20th and 21st century Globalization patterns. Through modern invention and progress in technology the world has become a place where connections can be created at the speed of light. Through technology, the world no longer has to wait for the physical movement of goods and ideas, at the touch of a button information can be in anyone's hands 

Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 1, 10:48 PM
Globalization is a process that has been occurring for centuries.  However, modern technology is making globalization faster than ever, and has enabled globalization to shift to a more information- and knowledge-based exchange rather than ever as well thanks to the Internet.
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An all-female crew lands a plane in Saudi Arabia. But they can’t drive from the airport.

An all-female crew lands a plane in Saudi Arabia. But they can’t drive from the airport. | HumanGeo | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia is notorious for its ban on female drivers.
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Are we better off than we think?

"Despite global inequalities, most of the world is better off than you think - and better off than it has ever been before.  Watch Hans Rosling explain why."


Tags: media, models, gapminder, development, perspective.

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The science of slums - Geographical

The science of slums - Geographical | HumanGeo | Scoop.it
In an edited extract from his new book, Danny Dorling, professor of human geography at the University of Sheffield, argues that the idea of the population bomb is a fallacy and that the human population is checking its rise without the need for a grand plan

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Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:39 PM

This essay is written by a critic of Thomas Malthus and could serve as a bridge to discuss issues in a population unit and an urban unit.  In a nutshell, Dorling feels that that Malthusian-like fears and assumptions about the proliferation of slums are unfounded; this is a good reading that can spark some conversation in a college seminar. 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, urban, megacities, squatter.

geographynerd's curator insight, August 9, 2015 2:26 AM

This essay is written by a critic of Thomas Malthus and could serve as a bridge to discuss issues in a population unit and an urban unit.  In a nutshell, Dorling feels that that Malthusian-like fears and assumptions about the proliferation of slums are unfounded; this is a good reading that can spark some conversation in a college seminar. 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, urban, megacities, squatter.

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:07 AM

mega cities 

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Just Eat It - A food waste story (Trailer) - YouTube

In The Clean Bin Project, Jen Rustemeyer and Grant Baldwin attempted to produce zero waste in an examination of our throw-away society. As a followup, they t...
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Welcome To Whittier, Alaska, A Community Under One Roof

Welcome To Whittier, Alaska, A Community Under One Roof | HumanGeo | Scoop.it
This sleepy town on the west side of Prince William Sound is remote, and hit with brutal winter weather every year. Most of the residents live in a single 14-story building called Begich Towers.

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What’s the deal with Antarctica and the Arctic?

What’s the deal with Antarctica and the Arctic? | HumanGeo | Scoop.it

"Perhaps the biggest misunderstanding is that the Arctic and Antarctic are similar. One’s in the north and the other is in the south; but other than that, they’re the same, right? No, this couldn’t be more wrong. These polar opposites are literally polar opposites.
For starters, the Arctic is a small, shallow ocean surrounded by land: Eurasia, Greenland, Canada and the United States. It’s only about 5 ½ million square miles, which is five times smaller than the Atlantic and 11 times smaller than the Pacific. Antarctica, on the other hand, is a continent surrounded by the entire Southern Ocean.

This may seem like no big deal, but it makes all the difference in the world. It takes a lot of energy to change water temperature compared to what it takes to change land temperature, which means Arctic seawater isn’t as cold as the continental ice sheet covering Antarctica. So, the Arctic sea ice (frozen sea water) is about 10 feet thick, whereas the Antarctic ice sheet (compacted freshwater ice) is over a mile thick."

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arctic, Antarctica.


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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, November 12, 2014 9:05 PM

It would be nice to keep both

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, November 17, 2014 2:51 PM

If we are

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How cultures around the world make decisions

How cultures around the world make decisions | HumanGeo | Scoop.it
Is the American obsession with individual freedom really such a great idea? What other cultures know about how to make good choices.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2014 1:16 PM

This article show three distinct cultural approaches to the concept of choice, showing how they shape people and communities and cultural systems.  The three models discussed are:

  • One American model: Give me personal autonomy or give me death.
  • The Amish model: Belonging, not choice, is crucial.
  • One Asian model: Focus on interdependence and harmony, not independence and self-expression.

This TED talk from Malcolm Gladwell is also an interesting exploration into the world of choice and options.


Tagsculture, worldwideTED.

Dennis Swender's curator insight, November 11, 2014 3:31 PM

Decision tilmes, more or less

Scott Langston's curator insight, November 16, 2014 6:26 PM

Culture's influence on decision-making

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Using BatchGeo

"Quick 1 minute tutorial on using BatchGeo to create a map. This example shows copying data straight from Wikipedia and mapping, but you can also use spreadsheets, databases, or any other tab delimited dataset."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 11, 2014 9:58 PM

BatchGeo is incredibly easy to use mapping platform...think of it as GIS-lite.  If you have a spreadsheet full of point data, you can make a map with your own data.  


Tags mapping, 201, CSV, edtech.


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23 maps and charts on language

23 maps and charts on language | HumanGeo | Scoop.it

"Did you know that Swedish has more in common with Hindi than it does with Finnish? Explaining everything within the limits of the world is probably too ambitious a goal for a list like this. But here are 23 maps and charts that can hopefully illuminate small aspects of how we manage to communicate with one another."


Tags: language, culture, English, infographic.


Via Seth Dixon
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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:40 PM

Mapping of languages...

Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, March 19, 2015 11:15 AM

This article links with Unit Three through "language and communication". These 23 maps range from the history of languages, which languages connect with which, common languages in certain places, different phrases used in the same country for the same thing, and more. Looking at maps to spatially see language helps when trying to understand how the world communicates. One of the maps that I found interesting was the "New York tweets by language". It shows how diverse that city is, and how people are still preserving their native language in a English prominent country.  

Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 2015 9:00 PM

Unit 2:

Shows how many languages are actually closely related. Whether or not they sound the same or are located in similar regions, many share the same origins. For example: many words in Spanish and English are the same due to their similar roots. 

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MLA Language Map

MLA Language Map | HumanGeo | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 30, 2014 7:51 PM

This is a great ESRI-powered portal to information and spatial data about languages in the United States.


Tags: language, culture, English, ESRI, USA.

Aria Snedegar's curator insight, January 30, 2015 10:02 AM

This is cool

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Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel | HumanGeo | Scoop.it

"The Sahel’s ability to produce food is not keeping pace with its growing population, and global warming will only exacerbate the imbalance, according to a new study.  Among the 22 countries making up the arid region in northern Africa, the population grew to 471 million in 2010 from 367 million in 2000, a jump of nearly 30%. As the population grew rapidly, the production of crops remained essentially unchanged.  Using satellite images to calculate annual crop production in the conflict-ridden Sahel belt, south of the Sahara desert, the researchers then compared output with population growth and food and fuel consumption."

 

Tags: Africa, Sahel, population, environment, water, ecology, environment depend, weather and climate, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 5:59 PM

with the strife in this region it is hardly surprising that it is hard to maintain food supplies in the face of large scale immigration. in a region where it is hard to survive, immigration would be a massive threat, straining already thinly spread resources.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:22 AM

If a country has a big population growth, the resources that it has if they are already scarce may become devastating. As the population of Sahel does increase, the amount of food resources will not have the proper time to react to the growth. Granted it may take a while for agricultural crops to grow and many citizens may face hard times facing finding food, but their hardships will be overcome by farmers trying to produce more crops to help ease that hardship.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:38 PM

this seems like an alarmingly common problem in the world today with population growth happening at an alarming rate in many parts of the world. most notably india and china. as well as in sahel, if your population grows by 100 million in 10 years it will be impossible to keep up and be able to provide for that many people in such a reletively short time.

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Special APHG Edition of the Journal of Geography

Special APHG Edition of the Journal of Geography | HumanGeo | Scoop.it

"The special APHG issue of the Journal of Geography (Volume 115, Issue 3) has 11 articles that are all focused on APHG."


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With 11 superb articles from leaders in the APHG community, this issue of the Journal of Geography is a MUST HAVE for all APHG teachers (all NCGE members can digitally access it).  If you aren't an NCGE member yet, this alone is reason to become one today).  

 

On Saturday, July 30, 2016, members of the AP Human Geography Development Committee will present a workshop for high school AP teachers during the annual conference of the National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE). The workshop will take place between 8:00 A.M. and 12:15 P.M. at the Tampa Marriott Waterside Hotel. The cost of the workshop is included in the NCGE conference attendance fee.  A special conference rate is available for Florida teachers.  Early-bird registration ends April 1st so act now.

 

Tags: NCGE, APHG, geography education, teacher training.

 

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 1, 2016 8:12 AM

With 11 superb articles from leaders in the APHG community, this issue of the Journal of Geography is a MUST HAVE for all APHG teachers (all NCGE members can digitally access it).  If you aren't an NCGE member yet, this alone is reason to become one today).  

 

On Saturday, July 30, 2016, members of the AP Human Geography Development Committee will present a workshop for high school AP teachers during the annual conference of the National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE). The workshop will take place between 8:00 A.M. and 12:15 P.M. at the Tampa Marriott Waterside Hotel. The cost of the workshop is included in the NCGE conference attendance fee.  A special conference rate is available for Florida teachers.  Early-bird registration ends April 1st so act now.

 

Tags: NCGE, APHG, geography education, teacher training.

 

Ivan Ius's curator insight, April 3, 2016 12:04 PM

With 11 superb articles from leaders in the APHG community, this issue of the Journal of Geography is a MUST HAVE for all APHG teachers (all NCGE members can digitally access it).  If you aren't an NCGE member yet, this alone is reason to become one today).  

 

On Saturday, July 30, 2016, members of the AP Human Geography Development Committee will present a workshop for high school AP teachers during the annual conference of the National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE). The workshop will take place between 8:00 A.M. and 12:15 P.M. at the Tampa Marriott Waterside Hotel. The cost of the workshop is included in the NCGE conference attendance fee.  A special conference rate is available for Florida teachers.  Early-bird registration ends April 1st so act now.

 

Tags: NCGE, APHG, geography education, teacher training.

 

K Rome's curator insight, October 6, 7:54 PM

With 11 superb articles from leaders in the APHG community, this issue of the Journal of Geography is a MUST HAVE for all APHG teachers (all NCGE members can digitally access it).  If you aren't an NCGE member yet, this alone is reason to become one today).  

 

On Saturday, July 30, 2016, members of the AP Human Geography Development Committee will present a workshop for high school AP teachers during the annual conference of the National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE). The workshop will take place between 8:00 A.M. and 12:15 P.M. at the Tampa Marriott Waterside Hotel. The cost of the workshop is included in the NCGE conference attendance fee.  A special conference rate is available for Florida teachers.  Early-bird registration ends April 1st so act now.

 

Tags: NCGEAPHG, geography education, teacher training.

 

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20 ways Google MyMaps can enhance lessons in any class

20 ways Google MyMaps can enhance lessons in any class | HumanGeo | Scoop.it

Maps cross all content areas and grade levels. By creating custom MyMaps, students can see the content they've studied in a new light.

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Stunning 3D Topographic Maps of Any Place on Earth

Stunning 3D Topographic Maps of Any Place on Earth | HumanGeo | Scoop.it
These highly detailed maps function as cartographic wall art.

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The ArcGIS Book

The ArcGIS Book | HumanGeo | Scoop.it

"Explore ten 'big ideas' that encapsulate the technological and social trends that have pushed geographic information systems (GIS) onto the Internet in a significant way. See how to apply these ideas to your own world. Open your eyes to what is now possible with Web GIS, and put the technology and deep data resources in your hands via the Quickstarts and Learn ArcGIS lessons that are included in each chapter."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 19, 2015 10:12 PM

I haven't fully previewed this online textbook yet but I am VERY optimistic about this one from the ESRI library.  You can also download the textbook as a PDF here.  There are several other online textbooks that would interest geography teachers     


Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, textbook.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 22, 2015 2:13 PM

I haven't fully previewed this online textbook yet but I am VERY optimistic about this one from the ESRI library.  You can also download the textbook as a PDF here.  There are several other online textbooks that would interest geography teachers     


Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, textbook.

Annenkov's curator insight, August 5, 2015 4:30 PM

I haven't fully previewed this online textbook yet but I am VERY optimistic about this one from the ESRI library.  You can also download the textbook as a PDF here.  There are several other online textbooks that would interest geography teachers     


Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, textbook.

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Why are we so reliant on air conditioning? (It's not just climate change, it's bad design)

Why are we so reliant on air conditioning? (It's not just climate change, it's bad design) | HumanGeo | Scoop.it
Air conditioners have made architects lazy, and we've forgotten how to design houses that might work without it.

 

A hundred years ago, a house in Florida looked different than a house in New England. The northern house might be boxy, have relatively small windows, almost always two stories with low ceilings, and a big fireplace in the middle. 

In Florida, the house might have high ceilings, tall double-hung windows, and deep porches. Trees would be planted around the house to block the sun. 

Today, houses pretty much look the same wherever you go in North America, and one thing made this possible: central air conditioning. Now, the United States uses more energy for air conditioning than 1 billion people in Africa use for everything.

 

Tags: planning, architecture, housing, urban, place, environment adapt, energy, consumption.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 21, 2015 12:44 PM

The recent demographic shift to the "Sun Belt" in the U.S.  coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors).  Our homes are less regionally distinct and in terms of the human/environmental interactions, our answer is greater modifications as opposed to regional adaptations...this article is a call for more architectural improvements instead of more energy consumption to beat the heat.  In Europe however, they see the United States as "over air-conditioned" in the summer.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 23, 2015 1:12 PM

A GOOD STORY ABOUT AIR CONDITIONING

James Piccolino's curator insight, February 8, 7:04 AM
This intrigues me as both a former student of Architecture at CACTC and as a lover of the comforts of air conditioning. This argument is similar to the argument of most technology. We have adapted to become more dependent on air conditioning, and thus it has had an effect on the way we operate. This leads to uniformity in designs where simplicity can overtake the dwindling need for variation due to climate. The more that technology can change the climate to what we desire (at least in our homes) the less variation we will need over time. Whether this is good or bad depends on what side of the argument you fall to.
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Why the EU wants to stop you posting your vacation photos online

Why the EU wants to stop you posting your vacation photos online | HumanGeo | Scoop.it

"The selfie may never be the same again. EU lawmakers are considering plans that would make it illegal to publish photos of famous landmarks such as the London Eye or the Frankfurt skyline - plans opposed by many of those they're designed to protect ..."


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Why Indians love cricket

Why Indians love cricket | HumanGeo | Scoop.it
TO OUTSIDERS, the magnitude of Indians' love for cricket is as incomprehensible as its feverish intensity. On February 4th India awarded the Bharat Ratna, its highest civilian honour, to Sachin Tendulkar, a recently retired batsman. Millions in India, a country of 1.3 billion people and only one nationally-popular game, celebrated wildly. When India's national side plays a big game, an estimated 400m watch on television. Yet cricket's take-off in India is a highly improbable development. The game is demanding to play properly, requiring space, a good turf pitch and expensive equipment—which only a relative handful of Indian cricketers have access to. Most will never strap on pads or bowl with a leather ball. So why do they so love the game?

 

Tags: sport, popular culture, culture, development, India, South Asia, globalization, empire.


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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 10, 2015 6:19 AM

Why do Indians love Cricket? As with most modern day countries, colonialism has something to do with it. However, the British never intended to promote Cricket in India. It was the local elite of India that first pushed to incorporate the game into Indian culture. Desperate to gain the prestige that the British attached to the game, the elite began the practice of playing Cricket in India. In the years following independence, the game has spread to the other classes of Indian society. The game has become the national pastime for the nation.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:52 AM

this is an interesting reason for a game to spread. it was a game played by the elite, so it never really lost the appeal of being a sport of the rich.

 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:30 PM

i have tried to watch a cricket match before but it seemed so odd, i dont really fully understand the game but the people playing (especially inians) were playing more than a game, for them it seemed like they were playing for their country and it was a great honor to them. unlike a sport like soccer where people play for other countries teams.

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A Field Of Medicine That Wants To Know Where You Live

A Field Of Medicine That Wants To Know Where You Live | HumanGeo | Scoop.it
Where do you live? Health specialists think that simple question could make a difference in how doctors prevent and treat diseases for individuals. That's expanding its storied role in public health.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 2, 2014 8:53 PM

This article highlights how spatial thinking and geospatial technologies can solve real world problems--in this case, tracking the spread of diseases is a spatial situation and not all places close to each other are equally connected to the same networks. 


Tagsmedical, diffusion, mapping, GISspatial, geospatial.

Gregory Stewart's curator insight, August 29, 2015 9:35 AM

Geography gives us a perspective that has meaning.

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Golden Temple of Amristar

"The Golden Temple is the holiest shrine of the Sikh religion. It is also home to one of the largest free eateries in the world. Read the related article."


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Louis Mazza's curator insight, April 6, 2015 4:33 PM

The Golden Temple of Amristar, located in the northern Punjab region of India, is renowned as the holiest shrine in the Sikh religion. 80,000 -160,000 people come here each day to enjoy a free eatery on top of prayer. This is the largest free eatery in the world. What an unbelievable idea that this huge number of people can enjoy free food. Food is cooked up by workers in large vats in order to feed the masses. This is not a homeless shelter, there was a man in this video who said he was from a prominent family and he can to the temple because he felt peace of mind here. The temple is covered in glitter and gold hence its name.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 24, 2015 10:53 AM

I think this idea is excellent. Sikhism is a blend of Islam and Hinduism.  They believe that everyone is equal and strive for peace and tranquility.  The Golden Temple is, essentially, a place to go to get away from the fast-paced and cut-throat environment of everyday-life.  They accept all races and religions.  I love this model and idea.  I hope the Sikhs gain more attention and spread their simple idea of peace, love, and volunteerism.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 7, 2015 8:29 AM

This video provides some valuable insight into a religion that not many people know about. Sikhism combines elements of Hinduism and Islam, but rejects the Hindu concept of a caste system. It is practiced predominantly in the Punjab region of India, but practicing Sikhs can be found around the world. The Golden Temple of Amristar is one of Sikhism's most important holy sites, and adherents of any religion are welcome at the temple. There is a large community kitchen inside the temple, where volunteers produce tens of thousands of meals for temple visitors everyday. Everyone who visits the temple sits and eats together in the community eatery, as Sikhs believe all people are equal, and so they are not concerned with separating visitors by gender, race, or religion.

 

Sikhism and its Golden Temple are really interesting examples of cross-cultural pollination. While it is not unusual to see cultures adapt elements of fashion or music from other cultures, it is unusual to see one culture fuse its religion with another. Generally, religion is seen as a concrete ideology with immutable truths that should not be disturbed or tampered with. Sikhism sheds this rigidity and incorporates elements of two major religions into one, creating a religion of peace, equality, and tolerance. This is the ideal of any religion, and Sikhism exhibits wonderfully. The Punjab region of India acts as a melting pot for Hinduism and Islam, creating a geographic center for ideologies that reach far beyond their geographic origins. Though Sikhism is a small religion compared to Islam or Hinduism, it provides a fascinating and excellent example of how cultures can come together peacefully to create something new and positive. 

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Meandering Stream Time Lapse

The most viral images on the internet, curated in real time by a dedicated community through commenting, voting and sharing.

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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 1:24 PM

El Sire Reserve in Peru is a river that has been monitored over the last 28 years. Every time I watch this short 6 second clip, I learn something different about how this river has changed. On the bottom of the screen, just past half way, the river just takes a huge short cut and cuts over and connects to a different part of the same river. This happens on the whole river too. there are 8 or 9 huge bends and curves in the river but by the end in 2012 there are only about 3 to 4 bends and curves. For some reason the water is taking short cuts and just leaving the spaces where the water used to run through and leaving it dry.  

Mathijs Booden's curator insight, January 20, 2016 8:35 AM

This is such a tangible way of showing things that seem abstract on a static map.

Pieter de Paauw's curator insight, February 15, 2016 6:28 AM

Een natuurlijk meanderende rivier

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Industrial Revolution--Urban Game

Industrial Revolution--Urban Game | HumanGeo | Scoop.it

"Each student should have a large piece of butcher block paper (15x20).  They should use a pencil for this activity (color pencils are optional).Using the template provided, each student should make their own template.  It is crucial that size for each of the 'characters' in the city be the same. As you read each of the Rounds, your pace should increase so that by Round 15 the students will only have a short time to draw their buildings."                                

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Learn What Spatial Analysis Can Do for You

Learn What Spatial Analysis Can Do for You | HumanGeo | Scoop.it

"This Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) is for people who know something about data analysis and want to learn about the special capabilities of spatial data analysis. Spatial analysis focuses on location to gain a deeper understanding of data. Spatial analysis skills are in high demand by organizations around the world. You'll get free access to the full analytical capabilities of ArcGIS Online, Esri's cloud-based GIS platform. Previous experience with GIS software is helpful, but not necessary for tech-savvy problem solvers. Could you and your career go places with spatial analysis?"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 2014 3:43 PM

This course starts tomorrow...if you've wanted to learn about GIS with a no-risk on-ramp, this looks to be a safe bet from the worldwide leader in geospatial software.  While a grad student at Penn State, I was a TA for a course designed by David DiBiase (the instructor of the MOOC), and I still refer back to that class as one of the best courses to teach geographic skills for the non-geography major.  


Tagsmapping, spatial, teacher training, GIS ESRI, geospatial, edtech.