Easily recognisable symbols used by the local community
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Easily recognisable symbols used by the local community
Human Society and its Environment (HSIE)
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The Commonwealth Coat of Arms - Understand the Importance of National Symbols - TeacherVision.com

The Commonwealth Coat of Arms - Understand the Importance of National Symbols - TeacherVision.com | Easily recognisable symbols used by the local community | Scoop.it
This fact sheet about the Australian coat of arms will help your students analyze each part of our national symbol. They will use it to complete the attached worksheet, calling their attention to important elements of national symbolism.
Annie Hyun's insight:

Teachers can use this fact sheet about the Commonwealth coat of arms to explain about a significant Australian symbol in a stage two HSIE lesson. It is important for students to understand why symbols are used to convey meaning. By learning about the Commonwealth coat of arms the students can recognise themselves as a citizen of Australia. This is important as it enables students to feel “a sense of personal power” (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, pg. 405) leading to higher self-esteem and active participation in the society.

 

Begin the lesson by showing the Commonwealth coat of arms. The teacher can do this by showing it on an interactive whiteboard, computer or prepare a print of it prior to the lesson. Ask students where they might have seen the symbol. The stage two students might not have been widely exposed to the symbol therefore; it would be a good idea to show a real life example such as the Australian passport. The teacher can choose to use the worksheet provided with the information sheet or create their own. For an assessment task for the activity students create their own family crest using the website:

 

http://www.parkfieldict.co.uk/infant/castles/coat_of_arms.swf

 

This website is a fun and interactive way for the students to learn about coat of arms as it enables students to be creative and design their own family coat of arms. From this, the students need to be able to reflect back on the values and ideas of their own families. Also, the students can transfer these values and ideas into a symbolic form. The family coat of arms needs to be justified by the student in personal reflection.

 

To link this lesson to a numeracy lesson, the students can investigate about the Roman Numerals used in the text. Conduct a research to find out more about King Edward VII or King George V 

 

Reference: 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment, 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia 

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Civics | Aussie Symbols

Civics | Aussie Symbols | Easily recognisable symbols used by the local community | Scoop.it
Annie Hyun's insight:

This is a lesson outline created by Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations. The lesson encourages students to investigate their local symbols using various tools such as the internet, newspapers, magazines and primary research by investigating the local area. This is a great way for students to develop critical inquiry skills. The lesson follows the model of inquiry outlined in Gilbert and Hoepper (2011, pg.108-117). Firstly, the lesson introduces the symbol as the topic for the lesson through whole-class discussion to gather students’ prior knowledge. This is will be good way to stimulate interest for the topic. Secondly, the lesson encourages students to actively research about the topic. The lesson outline also emphasises on research skills using the appropriate and reliable websites and other sources. Lastly, it encourages students to present their findings to the class as a poster and a speech. This will help to solidify students’ understanding of the topic and also provide an opportunity for students to receive feedback from the teacher and peers.

 

Teachers could follow the lesson outline or modify it. A good way to modify the lesson is to set a specific local area investigation. For example, if the students’ local area is the Hills Shire Council, then, the students could research about a significant symbolic location such as the Rouse Hill farm and house.

 

Teachers can use this resource as an idea for a visual literacy lesson. During the lesson, the students will learn about the techniques used in visual texts and how they can decode meaning. It would be advisable for the teachers to concentrate on symbols as a powerful visual technique. The teacher could show various text as examples where symbols are frequently used to create meaning. 

 

Reference:

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment, 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia 

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The Hills Shire Council Crest

Annie Hyun's insight:

This fact sheet can be implemented as a resource into stage two HSIE lesson to explain about the each of the symbols in the Hills Shire Council crest used to explain about the early European history of the local area. It is important for children to learn about the crest as it a significant symbol that represents the local area. This symbolic representation of the local and its residents will help to develop students to feel accepted and part of the community (Gilbert &Hoepper 2011, pg. 288). Teachers can choose different local council crest according to the location of the schools. 

 

Using the fact sheet as a starting point, the class can investigate the use of the crest in the local area. The teacher can provide questions such as:

 

“Where have I seen the crest?”

“Why do we use this symbol?”

“How is it being used?

 

The students can conduct secondary research using computers and books. This will provide more information about the crest. The HSIE lesson could involve students using the informaiton that they have researched to create their own representation of the Hills Shire crest. The teacher can encourage students to consider the modern symbols in the local area. For example, the area has changed into a large suburban area. The children can include this as a symbol instead of the oranges used to represent the farming history of the area.

 

In order to deepen students’ understanding of the crest set an assessment task which involves students to individually conduct a research about the crest. Encourage students to visit the Hills Shire Council Main Administration Building and other significant local areas such as the Castle Hill War memorial. Students are to present their findings on a poster. Additionally, present a 5 minute speech.

   

For a literacy lesson the students can write an information report on the Hills Shire Council using the information gathered from examining the fact sheet. The teacher can provide a scaffold for information report to assist the students. The students will be able to strengthen their understanding of the local council crest by putting the information into their own words. The teacher should individual feedback to the students by writing comments about the level of detailed information researched by the student, the format of the information report. 

 

Reference:

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment, 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia 

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Aboriginal perspective- Talking Identity

Annie Hyun's insight:

This is a teacher kit created by the NSW Department of Education and Training written from Aboriginal perspectives. Teachers must embed Indigenous perspective into the curriculum because it is an effective way to encourage students to addressing racial and cultural acceptance (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, pg.388). The ‘Talking Identity’ also emphasises the need for all students to understand the concept of identity in order to gain a positive sense of belonging and acceptance to the society. There is a need for teachers to consulate the local Aboriginal communities when teaching Aboriginal perspectives to students (pg.10). This will not only help the teacher in teaching but also provide the students with richer learning experiences.

 

This resource could be incorporated into a HSIE stage two lessons. The teacher should be able to select appropriate materials from the resource to suit the needs of the class. For example, the teacher could design a lesson on local Indigenous symbols using the ‘Topic 3: Community symbols” (pg.34-40) as an idea to the lesson plan. It would be ideal for the teacher to organise for an Aboriginal elder from the local community to speak to the children about the symbols. It will be beneficial for students to be exposed to an Aboriginal elder from the local community as they will realise that there isn’t one Indigenous perspective (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, pg.393). Additionally, the students will be able to relate as they will be from the same local context. To link this resource to literacy, children could create information report about one of the Aboriginal symbols they have researched. It would be ideal if the class had accessibility to ipads or computers so that the students could create their information report digitally.

 

Reference:

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment, 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia 

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Global perspective- Flag Debate

Global perspective- Flag Debate | Easily recognisable symbols used by the local community | Scoop.it
One flag we do see a lot of though is our own Aussie flag particularly at celebrations like Australia Day. But recently some people have been talking about getting rid of the flag and replacing it with something else.
Annie Hyun's insight:

Symbols are all around us. Undoubtedly, the Australian flag is a major symbol that contributes to the identity of Australians. This ‘Behind the News ‘video is suitable for stage 2 students as it informs about the debate of changing the Australian flag. The Australian flag is undoubtedly a major symbol used in local communities to represent the country and its people. The video discusses the importance of the flag as it represents Australia at the global stages such as the Olympics. It questions whether there is a need to change the flag as it is very similar to other former British colony nations.

 

For a HSIE Lesson, encourage class discussion of the flag. The teacher should become the facilitator of the discussion but should not be overpowering.  Begin the discussion at a micro world level; “where have you seen the flag in your daily life?” The students will be able to come up with various answers because the Australian flag is displayed at most school assemblies around the nation. Then move the discussion to a macro world level. “How does the flag represent Australians at the global stage?” “When have you seen the flag being useen the flag being used?" Record the ideas from the class discussion on the board. Instruct students to create their own representation of the flag. Encourage students to consider other symbols they could add to create their own representation of Australia and its citizens. 

 

The inquiry aspect of the discussion will help students to develop a positive perspective on identity and culture of Australia and also about themselves.

The resource is ideal to be used to incorporate global education into stage two classrooms as children will learn about their own culture and also consider how Australian culture is being represented at the global stage through the national flag. Gilbert and Hoepper (2011), emphasises the importance of global education as it ensures students will develop acceptance to other cultures by firstly understanding their own.

 

The resource will be an excellent literacy stimulus for a class debate. The students can decide on their own opinions about the Australian flag. The teacher should encourage students to use lots of strong persuasive lanaguage such as "believe", "important" and "certain" to strengthen the argument. This will develop persuasive writing skills and also developing verbal presentation skills as students will present their argument to the class and the teacher. 

 

Reference:

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment, 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia 

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