Behavior, People and Organizations
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Behavior, People and Organizations
ARTICLES AND DISCUSSIONS ON MANAGING AND DEVELOPING PEOPLE AND ORGANIZATIONS ............ Summaries and Key Points are provided to assist followers to quickly grasp essential points.
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Gamification Is Simply Bells and Whistles

Gamification Is Simply Bells and Whistles | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it

eLearn Magazine is a leading source of high-quality information on the uses of online learning and training strategies in a variety of contexts for K-12, higher education, and the corporate workforce.eLearn Magazine presents new technologies and approaches for creating, delivering, and supporting online instruction and workplace performance.

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Gamification: Powering Up or Game Over?

Gamification: Powering Up or Game Over? | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it

Criticism of managers who use workplace games to promote productivity has been gaining steam lately -- how can businesses use games effectively?

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A World With No Bosses: Turns Out, Not That Great

A World With No Bosses: Turns Out, Not That Great | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it

Last year, the company’s turnover rate was 30 percent.

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Beyond the Holacracy Hype

Beyond the Holacracy Hype | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it
The overwrought claims—and actual promise—of the next generation of self-managed teams
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Debunking The Homework Myth

Debunking The Homework Myth | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it

Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

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What Does The Future Of Human Resources Look Like?

What Does The Future Of Human Resources Look Like? | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it

What was viewed by many as one of the least exciting areas of an organization is now one of the most dynamic places to work, here are all the ways Human Resources is evolving.


Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
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Ten Questions for 'Fake' News Detection

Ten Questions for 'Fake' News Detection | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it

"Fake" news has been in the news quite a bit, and this infographic provides 10 questions that will help students determine if the information is 'real' or 'fake'.

And if this is of interest to you, also check out the executive summary from Stanford Evaluating Information: The Cornerstone of Civic Online Information. The summary provides examples of assessments for middle school, high school, and college students.


Via Beth Dichter
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Town in Iceland paints a 3D pedestrian crossing to slow traffic

Town in Iceland paints a 3D pedestrian crossing to slow traffic | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it

The town of Ísafjörður in Iceland has painted this 3D effect zebra crossing in an attempt to lower traffic speeds.

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How to use psychology to make beer taste better

How to use psychology to make beer taste better | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it

... a concept worth considering for the (non-alcoholic) workplace.


With a little thought and planning, even the most routine and unpleasant tasks can be engineered to be more palatable. 


Changing reality is often difficult, time-consuming and expensive. Changing perceptions can be immediate, cheap and powerful.

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18 Types Of Professor.

18 Types Of Professor. | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it

If you’re heading off to college in the fall, you are about to encounter the varied, fascinating species that dominates the college landscape: The professor. Academia attracts brilliant, diverse, often strange people, which only makes sense given ...

Terence R. Egan's insight:
I dare not think.
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Priming studies discredited -- another casualty of the "Replication Crisis".

Priming studies discredited -- another casualty of the "Replication Crisis". | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it

We computed the R-Index for studies cited in Chapter 4 of Kahneman’s book “Thinking Fast and Slow.” This chapter focuses on priming studies, starting with John Bargh’s study that led to Kahneman’s open email.  The results are eye-opening and jaw-dropping. 


Authors: Ulrich Schimmack, Moritz Heene, and Kamini Kesavan

Terence R. Egan's insight:

Response from Daniel Kahneman


I accept the basic conclusions of this blog. To be clear, I do so (1) without expressing an opinion about the statistical techniques it employed and (2) without stating an opinion about the validity and replicability of the individual studies I cited.


What the blog gets absolutely right is that I placed too much faith in underpowered studies. As pointed out in the blog, and earlier by Andrew Gelman, there is a special irony in my mistake because the first paper that Amos Tversky and I published was about the belief in the “law of small numbers,” which allows researchers to trust the results of underpowered studies with unreasonably small samples. We also cited Overall (1969) for showing “that the prevalence of studies deficient in statistical power is not only wasteful but actually pernicious: it results in a large proportion of invalid rejections of the null hypothesis among published results.”


Our article was written in 1969 and published in 1971, but I failed to internalize its message. My position when I wrote “Thinking, Fast and Slow” was that if a large body of evidence published in reputable journals supports an initially implausible conclusion, then scientific norms require us to believe that conclusion. Implausibility is not sufficient to justify disbelief, and belief in well-supported scientific conclusions is not optional. This position still seems reasonable to me – it is why I think people should believe in climate change. But the argument only holds when all relevant results are published.


I knew, of course, that the results of priming studies were based on small samples, that the effect sizes were perhaps implausibly large, and that no single study was conclusive on its own. What impressed me was the unanimity and coherence of the results reported by many laboratories. I concluded that priming effects are easy for skilled experimenters to induce, and that they are robust. However, I now understand that my reasoning was flawed and that I should have known better.


Unanimity of underpowered studies provides compelling evidence for the existence of a severe file-drawer problem (and/or p-hacking). The argument is inescapable: Studies that are underpowered for the detection of plausible effects must occasionally return non-significant results even when the research hypothesis is true – the absence of these results is evidence that something is amiss in the published record.


Furthermore, the existence of a substantial file-drawer effect undermines the two main tools that psychologists use to accumulate evidence for a broad hypotheses: meta-analysis and conceptual replication. Clearly, the experimental evidence for the ideas I presented in that chapter was significantly weaker than I believed when I wrote it. This was simply an error: I knew all I needed to know to moderate my enthusiasm for the surprising and elegant findings that I cited, but I did not think it through.


When questions were later raised about the robustness of priming results I hoped that the authors of this research would rally to bolster their case by stronger evidence, but this did not happen. I still believe that actions can be primed, sometimes even by stimuli of which the person is unaware. There is adequate evidence for all the building blocks: semantic priming, significant processing of stimuli that are not consciously perceived, and ideo-motor activation. I see no reason to draw a sharp line between the priming of thoughts and the priming of actions. A case can therefore be made for priming on this indirect evidence.


But I have changed my views about the size of behavioral priming effects – they cannot be as large and as robust as my chapter suggested. I am still attached to every study that I cited, and have not unbelieved them, to use Daniel Gilbert’s phrase. I would be happy to see each of them replicated in a large sample.


The lesson I have learned, however, is that authors who review a field should be wary of using memorable results of underpowered studies as evidence for their claims.

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How Metacognition Can Help Your Life

Studies reveal the impact of strategic thinking on studying and other areas of life.
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Recruiters' Dark Secrets That Cost You Job Offers

Recruiters' Dark Secrets That Cost You Job Offers | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it

Recruiters are often asked to do the impossible, which sometimes makes them resort to unsavory—or downright discriminatory—practices.

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Salesforce And Deloitte Engage With Gamification

Salesforce And Deloitte Engage With Gamification | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it

With less than 30 percent of workers today committed to and satisfied with their work, leaders need to find ways to change their employees’ attitudes and habits. Gamification can help.

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Adobe Success Story

Adobe Success Story | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it

Learn how Bunchball helped Adobe experience a 4x increase from free trial to sales as new users learned the product & existing developed new skills

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How a Radical Shift Left Zappos Reeling

How a Radical Shift Left Zappos Reeling | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it

A move to “self-management” has shaken Zappos. Can it regain its mojo?

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How can schools use research to better inform teaching practice?

How can schools use research to better inform teaching practice? | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it
To tackle misinformation about what works in teaching, schools must find effective ways to help teachers understand the implications of research
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Important Things to Know About Reflective Learning

Important Things to Know About Reflective Learning | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it

In this article we'll discuss the concept of what's called reflective learning. We'll look at some examples and applications and discover its importance.


Via Chris Carter
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Chris Carter's curator insight, November 22, 2017 7:59 PM
A reflective learning primer on a page
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Information Without Emotion Is Rarely Retained

Information Without Emotion Is Rarely Retained | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it
But emotions are an important way for us to connect. It's how we better understand ourselves and others. Emotions help us to reach the heart and not just the mind.

We know that stories are powerful for learning. I think that's because of how stories connect to emotions. You can talk about ideas all day, and I might be interested and even learn something. But if you connect those ideas with a story, and you touch my emotions, I may never forget what I've learned.

Via Mel Riddile, Dean J. Fusto
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The Socratic Process

The Socratic Process | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it
Hola: Una infografía sobre el proceso socrático. Un saludo

Via Beth Dichter
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Audrey's curator insight, August 9, 2013 7:39 AM

Using the Socratic process the educator is a tutor.  The process  encourages evaluative and analytical thinking.

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, August 9, 2013 12:55 PM

This is an easy and yet thorough infographic.

Abel Linares's curator insight, December 3, 2017 9:30 AM
Socratic #Process
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How to make sense of behavioural ETFs

How to make sense of behavioural ETFs | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it
Can you make serious money by capitalizing on human foibles?
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Every Cognitive Bias in One Graphic

Every Cognitive Bias in One Graphic | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it
Here's all 188 cognitive biases in existence, grouped by how they impact our thoughts and actions. We also give some specific cognitive bias examples.
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Playing Office Politics Without Selling Your Soul

Playing Office Politics Without Selling Your Soul | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it
Not all politics are bad.
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Why every office should scrap its clean desk policy

Why every office should scrap its clean desk policy | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it

Financial journalist and economist Tim Harford writes about an experiment to identify the most productive and inspiring office setup.

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20 Biases that screw up your decisions 

20 Biases that screw up your decisions  | Behavior, People and Organizations | Scoop.it
20 cognitive biases in a chart that could keep you from making a bad decision.
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