Human Geography is Everything!
2.2K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from AP Human Geography Resources
onto Human Geography is Everything!
Scoop.it!

Who will Americans become? "In the future, we will be..." (presented by Priyank Shah at TEDxColumbus)

Dr. Shah is a demographer and a very enthusiastic one.  He'll begin our day with baseline picture of where we are headed as a population so we will better understand ourselves as a society.  But no worries, you'll be entertained with his take on these trends, as he himself is a living example of one of the most prolific ones.

Via Mr. David Burton, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
more...
No comment yet.
Human Geography is Everything!
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

State Borders

State Borders | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 16, 3:06 PM

I imagine most geographers have wanted to tinker with state or international borders to 'fix them' in one way or another...but if any 'correction' were to be made, whose criteria would be used?  Which people in which regions would be upset by the changes?  Historical inertia is a power force in maintaining the status quo. When France was preparing to consolidate it's administrative regions, 68% recognized that consolidating regional administration would be more efficient but 77% didn't want it to impact their own local region.

 

Tags: XKCD, art, mapping, cartography, borders, political.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

When Rich Places Want to Secede

When Rich Places Want to Secede | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
At the core of Catalonia’s separatist movement is an argument that a country’s better-off regions shouldn’t have to pay to cover their less productive counterparts.

 

As a relatively rich region with its own independence movement, Catalonia's not alone: A small set of secession movements in historically productive areas, most visibly in Europe, say they’d be better off on their own, and more are pointing to Catalonia's example to regain momentum.

The common wisdom used to be that separatist movements mostly came from weak minorities that rallied around racial or ethnic injustices. “With globalization, that changed significantly,” said Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics (LSE). “Virtually everywhere in the world,” movements have swapped out the “identity card” for the “economic card.”

Inequality between regions is baked into the entire concept of modern nationhood—if subsidizing poorer parts of a country were motivation enough to split off, every region would have done it by now. Plus, there are economic perks to staying together: Trade is easier across internal borders, and diversified regions diffuse risk.

 

Tags: Catalonia, economic, political, devolution, autonomy, Europe.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Divided island: How Haiti and the DR became two worlds

Haiti and the Dominican Republic share a border, and an island. But the two countries are very different today: the Dominican Republic enjoys higher quality of life for many factors than Haiti. I went to this island and visited both countries, to try and understand when and how their paths diverged.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 23, 3:14 PM

This video is an exciting debut for the new series "Vox borders."  By just about every development metric available, the Dominican Republic is doing better than Haiti, the only bordering country on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola with the DR.   

 

Questions to Ponder: How does the border impact both countries?  How has sharing one island with different colonial legacies shaped migrational push and pull factors?

 

Tags: Haiti, Dominican Republic, video, poverty, development, economic, labor, migration, political, borders.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

What can Chinese cities learn from Singapore?

What can Chinese cities learn from Singapore? | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
Last week, I had the opportunity to attend the Singapore Urban Week along with other colleagues from the World Bank Beijing office, as well as delegates from China’s national government and participating cities. For all of us, this trip to Singapore was an eye-opening experience that highlighted the essential role of integrated urban planning in building sustainable cities, and provided practical solutions that can be readily adapted to help achieve each city’s own development vision. A couple of key lessons learned:
Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

xkcd: Map Projections

xkcd: Map Projections | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

Via Mathijs Booden
more...
Mathijs Booden's curator insight, April 27, 2016 12:21 AM
Torn between Robinson and Hodo-Dyer.
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why 80% of Singaporeans live in government-built flats

Why 80% of Singaporeans live in government-built flats | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
Lots of countries show off their public-housing projects, but few are quite as devoted to them as Singapore, where four-fifths of the permanent population live in subsidised units built by the government, most of them as owner-occupiers. The city-state’s suburbs bristle with HDB towers, painted calming pastel hues. This vast national housing system surprises visitors who think of Singapore as a low-tax hub for expatriate bankers and big multinationals. But HDB is a linchpin of economic and social policy and an anchor for the ruling People’s Action Party (PAP), which has led Singapore since independence. It is also a tantalising but tricky model for Singapore’s fast-urbanising neighbours to follow.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 10, 12:39 PM

Singapore is such a fascinating case study.  Over 90% of the Singapore’s land is owned by the government and the American ideal of independent home ownership is seen as antithetical to cultural norms.  The government heavily subsidies young couples to live near their parents and create tight-knit communities with homelessness was eradicated (that’s the optimists’ perspective).  This is all well and good for young, straight couples that choose to support the ruling political party, but critics often point out that the housing focus has also created a paternalistic component to the government that is much stronger in Singapore than in other countries.  This article nicely goes with the 2017 APHG reading professional development talk entitled “The Geographies of Home” that focused on Singaporean and Japanese examples.    

 

Tag: Singapore, urban, neighborhood, economicplanning, housing, cultural norms.

Mr Mac's curator insight, July 24, 9:26 AM
Unit 4 - Political, Government; Unit 7 - Urban Spaces, housing, Urban Planning
Cherise Chng's comment, August 27, 9:50 AM
As a young Singaporean, I am really proud of such an unique architecture that is representable of Singapore. These flats, or what we call HDB, provides us with many Singaporeans with a roof over their head despite land scarcity in Singapore. Some HDB flats has a sky garden while majority of the others has a gathering area on the ground floor to provide an opportunity to mingle with our neighbours. It is truly a Singaporean memory to be living in a HDB flat.
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why geography matters now more than ever

Why geography matters now more than ever | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"Students need to know human geography; they need to understand the relationships that exist between cultures."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
LRC's curator insight, September 4, 6:08 PM
Share your insight
Ivan Ius's curator insight, September 5, 11:38 AM
Geographic concepts: Patterns & Trends; Interrelationships; Geographic Perpsective
Uart.com's curator insight, September 8, 5:22 AM

Geography is more important than ever to explain and understand the art market in globalization and digitization turn.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why Don’t We All Speak the Same Language?

Why Don’t We All Speak the Same Language? | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
There are 7,000 languages spoken on Earth. What are the costs — and benefits — of our modern-day Tower of Babel?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 21, 10:40 AM

These two podcasts are great mainstream looks at issues that filled with cultural geography content.  So many languages on Earth is clearly inefficient (the EU spends $1 billion per year on translation), and yet, linguistic diversity is such a rich part of humanity's cultural heritage.  Listen to the first episode, Why Don't We All Speak the Same Language? as well as the follow-up episode, What Would Be the Best Universal Language?

 

Tags: languagecultureworldwide, English, regions, diffusiontechnology.

Andrew Kahn's curator insight, November 4, 8:13 PM
Culture speaks louder than words
 
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Spain crisis: 'stop this radicalism and disobedience,' PM tells Catalan leaders

Spain crisis: 'stop this radicalism and disobedience,' PM tells Catalan leaders | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"Spain’s prime minister has called on Catalan separatist leaders to end their 'escalation' as several thousand people took to the streets of Barcelona to protest at Madrid’s attempts to stop a banned referendum on independence. 'Stop this escalation of radicalism and disobedience once and for all.' Catalonia’s president earlier accused the Spanish government of suspending the region’s autonomy after police intensified efforts to stop a vote on independence that has sparked one of the worst political crises since Spain’s return to democracy four decades ago. Spanish Guardia Civil officers raided a dozen Catalan regional government offices and arrested 14 senior officials on Wednesday as part of an operation to stop the referendum from taking place on 1 October."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 3:05 PM

If you are looking for an example of devolution today, this is it.  This situation has escalated as Spain and Catalonia's governments cannot work together.  The referendum was (according to the Spanish government) outlawed but keep an eye on Catalonia over the next few weeks. 
UPDATE: This video from the Economist is an excellent summary of the situation.
 

 

Tags: Catalonia, Spain, political, devolution, autonomyEurope.

Ms. Amanda Fairchild's curator insight, October 16, 1:20 PM
This situation has escalated as Spain and Catalonia's governments cannot work together. The referendum was (according to the Spanish government) outlawed but keep an eye on Catalonia over the next few weeks. UPDATE: This video from the Economist is an excellent summary of the situation.
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Boston schools ditch conventional world maps in favor of this one

Boston schools ditch conventional world maps in favor of this one | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
Social studies classrooms throughout the Boston public school system are getting an upgrade some 448 years in the making.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 28, 2:21 PM

Personally, I'm not a fan of this decision, but it's as if they watched the classic West Wing clip and decided to roll with it. I think that the Peters projection map is better than the Mercator for most educational applications, but it isn't the "right, best, or true" map projection.  Many viral videos comparing the two love to exaggerate and say things like "The maps you use are lying to you" or "the world is nothing like you've ever seen."  Yes, Mercator maps distorts relative size, but it isn't a "wrong" map anymore than the Peters projection.  All maps have distortion and map readers need to under that all maps are a mathematical representation of the Earth.  

 

Tags: mapping, visualization, map projections, cartography, perspectiveeducation, geography, geography educationBoston.

Prescott Kermit's comment, June 15, 5:27 AM
http://www.free-tech-support.com/samsung-technical-support-number
Victor Ventura's curator insight, June 24, 9:00 AM
A new but correct way at looking at the real world. 448 years overdue.
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How the first city got started 12,000 years ago

"In this animated video, Jonathan F. P. Rose explains how the first city was started in Turkey, 12,000 years ago."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Angel Peeples's curator insight, May 11, 2:41 PM
  This article is related to world cultural by being about urbanization. My opinion on this article is that I cant believe that it was that long ago the first city started. Turkey was the first place of the first city because it was were agriculture started. I think it is pretty cool it all started with a structure that people just started building around. 
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 19, 10:25 AM
unit 7
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 9:03 PM

What led to the first urban settlements? We know that the beginnings of agriculture are closely connected to the first forays into agriculture and the domestication of animals.  This brief video puts some archeological specificity on the though exercise, "what would you need to start the first city in a world without cities?" 

 

Tags: urban, placehistorical.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Human Settlement Predictive Model

"Simulating climate conditions over the last 125,000 years and predicting how those changes would have allowed humans to spread around the globe, this video models human migration patterns." Read more: http://ow.ly/lWIp304qZEo


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 18, 3:14 PM

The World Economic Forum noted that some spatial research that was originally published in Nature, shows how geneticists took DNA samples from people of different cultures in different parts of the world to track their dispersal throughout the globe.  The video uses climatic data, combined with the genetic data, to create a model showing how the human race spread across the globe over a 125,000 year period.

 

Tagsdiffusiondemographicsmappingmigration, populationhistorical, video, visualization.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, May 18, 12:11 AM
Some interesting modelling based on climate change. I wonder what it would look like based on something different? Cultural differences? What came first culture or climate?
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 9:02 PM

The World Economic Forum noted that some spatial research that was originally published in Nature, shows how geneticists took DNA samples from people of different cultures in different parts of the world to track their dispersal throughout the globe.  The video uses climatic data, combined with the genetic data, to create a model showing how the human race spread across the globe over a 125,000 year period.

 

Tagsdiffusiondemographicsmappingmigration, populationhistorical, video, visualization.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Special Economic Zones

Special Economic Zones | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"Special Economic Zones (SEZs) are the most rapidly spreading kind of city, having catapulted exports and growth from Mauritius and the Dominican Republic to Shenzhen and Dubai -- and now across Africa. Today more than 4000 SEZs dot the planet, a major indication of our transition towards the "supply chain world" explored in Connectography.  See more maps from Connectography and order the book here."

 

Tags: globalization, urban, economic, industry, regions.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Kazakhstan to switch from Cyrillic to Latin alphabet

Kazakhstan to switch from Cyrillic to Latin alphabet | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"Kazakh was written in Arabic script until 1920 when it was substituted by the Latin alphabet. In 1940, it was replaced by a Cyrillic one. 'Given that over 100 countries in the world use the Latin script, it is crucial for Kazakhstan's integration into the global educational and economic environment,' said Gulnar Karbozova.

The former Soviet Republic declared independence in 1991. Its state language is Kazakh, a member of the Turkic family.

Yet, Russian is widely spoken across Kazakhstan and is its second official language."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 31, 3:45 PM

Having to translate your language into another is one level of cultural difference, but having to change into another writing system (transliteration) adds an extra layer of foreignness that makes interactions more difficult.  Kazakhstan, a with a history of connections to the Middle East and Russia, is now making a choice that appears to signal greater connection to the larger global community.  This is not going to be an easy transitions, as as this additional BBC article notes, the choice comes with plenty of advantages and disadvantages

 

Tags: languagecultureworldwide, regions, Central Asia, Kazakhstan.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Singapore passport becomes 'most powerful' in the world

Singapore passport becomes 'most powerful' in the world | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

Historically, the top ten most powerful passports in the world were mostly European, with Germany having the lead for the past two years. Since early 2017, Singapore has tied for number one position with Germany. For the first time ever an Asian country has the most powerful passport in the world. It is a testament of Singapore's inclusive diplomatic relations and effective foreign policy."

 

Tag: Singapore, SouthEastAsia, political, development.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 26, 10:02 PM

Who else is high on the list of the most powerful passports in the world?  This tier system is based on the number of visa-free entries available to the holder of the visa:

1. Singapore

2. Germany

3. Sweden

3. South Korea

4. Denmark

4. Finland

4. Italy

4. France

4. Spain

4. Norway

4. Japan

4. United Kingdom

5. Luxembourg

5. Switzerland

5. Netherlands

5. Belgium

5. Austria

5. Poland

6. Malaysia

6. Ireland

6. USA (that's tied for 19th for you competitive sorts)

6. Canada

7. Greece

7. New Zealand

7. Australia

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages

Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Andrew Kahn's curator insight, November 4, 8:12 PM
How many people can speak your language?
 
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 29, 8:50 AM
Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages
Ziggi Ivan Santini's curator insight, November 30, 4:00 AM

This infographic is a great way to visualize the dominant languages on Earth.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Where is the riskiest place to live?

Where is the riskiest place to live? | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
The world risk index reveals which countries are most at risk from rising sea levels and the increasing frequency of floods, droughts and storms

Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Who benefits from globalization?

1. The very rich and 2. the middle class in emerging economies.
Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Announcing a New Feature to Build Students’ Geography Skills

Announcing a New Feature to Build Students’ Geography Skills | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"As the image above shows, The Times reports from all over the globe. We have journalists in more than 30 international news bureaus worldwide, and every day we publish news, feature stories, videos, slide shows and more from dozens of countries around the world. Our new 'Country of the Week' feature celebrates this abundance to help build students’ geography skills. A weekly interactive quiz will first introduce students to a country via a recent video or photograph, then ask them to find that place on a map. Next, the quiz will focus on the demographics and culture of the country. Finally, we’ll include links to recent reporting from that place in case they, or you, would like to go further.

In 'Why Geography Matters,' Harm de Blij wrote that geography is 'a superb antidote to isolationism and provincialism,' and argued that 'the American public is the geographically most illiterate society of consequence on the planet, at a time when United States power can affect countries and peoples around the world.'

This spatial illiteracy, geographers say, can leave citizens without a framework to think about foreign policy questions more substantively. 'The paucity of geographical knowledge means there is no check on misleading public representations about international matters,' said Alec Murphy, a professor of geography at the University of Oregon."

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, geography matters.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
bintathletics's comment, September 11, 1:46 AM
good
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The World Bank is eliminating the term “developing country” from its data vocabulary

The World Bank is eliminating the term “developing country” from its data vocabulary | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"In the 2016 edition of its World Development Indicators, the World Bank has made a big choice: It’s no longer distinguishing between 'developed' countries and “developing” ones in the presentation of its data. The change marks an evolution in thinking about the geographic distribution of poverty and prosperity. But it sounds less radical when you consider that nobody has ever agreed on a definition for these terms in the first place. The International Monetary Fund says its own distinction between advanced and emerging market economies “is not based on strict criteria, economic or otherwise.” The United Nations doesn’t have an official definition of a developing country, despite slapping the label on 159 nations. And the World Bank itself had previously simply lumped countries in the bottom two-thirds of gross national income (GNI) into the category, but even that comparatively strict cut-off wasn’t very useful."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 25, 1:38 PM

Labels and categories are so often problematic, but they are also necessary to make sense of the vast amount of information.  Regional geography is inherently about lumping places together that have commonalities, but acknowledging that many differences from place to place makes the world infinitely varied and complex.  Since we can’t process an infinite amount of complexity, we categorize, for better or for worse.  In education, we are continually trying to show how some categorizations fail, hoping that our students will categorize the information they receive in better ways (non-racist ways for example).  The regional terms we use--Latin America, the Middle East, Europe, etc.—impacts how we think about the world.  Each of those terms highlights a few similarities and ignores some important differences.  The terms More Developed Countries (MDCs), Newly Industrialized Countries (NICs), and Less Developed (LDCs) is how many people have socioeconomically categorized the world’s countries, some preferring developing countries instead of LDCs because it less stigmatizing.  In 2015, many at the World Bank have thought that the term “Developing Countries” obscures more than it reveals.  In 2016, the World Bank removed the term from its database since there are more differences than similarities in the economic structures and trajectories of developing countries.         

 

Questions to Ponder: What are some of the major problems that you see with the term developing country?  Even with its problems, what utility is there in the term?  Will you keep using the term or will you abandon it?  How come? 

 

Tagsdevelopment, statistics, economicindustry.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 29, 3:06 AM

Global challenges: Development

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011)

Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011) | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
The map provides a level of detail previously unavailable. It is the first ever to collect data published by all of Europe’s municipalities.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
HumdeBut's curator insight, September 25, 12:12 PM
Voici une carte bien intéressante,où l'on peut voir les pôles d'attraction !
M Sullivan's curator insight, September 28, 9:41 PM
Interesting looking at Europe's population change. Good reference for analysing geographical trends.
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 29, 3:04 AM

Global challenges: Population 

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Sprawling Shanghai

Sprawling Shanghai | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
If you could go back in time to the 1980s, you would find a city that is drastically different than today’s Shanghai.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 20, 5:20 PM

This series of seven satellite images shows how quickly the economic development of China has impacted the urban sprawl of China's biggest cities.  Pictures of the downtown area's growth are impressive, but these aerial images show the full magnitude of the change. 

 

Tags: urbanremote sensing, megacities, China, urban ecology.

Mr Mac's curator insight, June 13, 10:17 AM
Unit 7 - Urban Sprawl 
Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Investing in Monumental Architecture

Investing in Monumental Architecture | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

City Hall in Philadelphia is a fantastic example of using architecture to create civic pride by investing in iconic, public buildings. Monumental architecture helps to create a sense of place and communal identity. This building has open air access, making the public feel that this is more their building."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 21, 2:43 PM

Question to Ponder: Is it "worth it" for government's to invest taxpayer dollars on ornate architecture? 

 

Tags: space, monumentsurban, architecture, place, landscape.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What if the British Empire Reunited Today?

The British Empire was the largest Empire to have ever existed in our history. So what would things look like if the empire reunited today?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 22, 9:55 PM

This is interesting perspective of the strength of the old British Empire as well as some of the inequalities that are part and parcel of empire. 

 

Tagsempire, UK, historical.

Rescooped by Scarpaci Human Geography from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

CIA's Cartography Division Shares Declassified Maps

CIA's Cartography Division Shares Declassified Maps | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"As much as James Bond is defined by his outlandish gadgets, one of the most important tools for real-life spies is actually much less flashy: maps. Whether used to gather information or plan an attack, good maps are an integral part of the tradecraft of espionage. Now, to celebrate 75 years of serious cartography, the Central Intelligence Agency has declassified and put decades of once-secret maps online.  These days, the C.I.A. and other intelligence agencies rely more on digital mapping technologies and satellite images to make its maps, but for decades it relied on geographers and cartographers for planning and executing operations around the world. Because these maps could literally mean the difference between life and death for spies and soldiers alike, making them as accurate as possible was paramount, Greg Miller reports for National Geographic."

 

Tags: mapping, geopolitics, map, historical, map archives. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.