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Little England: What's Left If Scotland Leaves?

Little England: What's Left If Scotland Leaves? | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
What is more likely to happen first: Greece will leave the eurozone, or Scotland will leave the UK?

 

Although there is currently only about 30% of Scotland that would support independence, this is something that will be gaining importance.  The United Kingdom is a complex political entity, with Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland connected with England.  The "divorce referendum" will be help on October 2014 to see if Scotland wishes to dissolve this union and many of the political and economic events throughout Europe will be seen through this prism, especially the Euro Zone crisis in southern European countries (e.g.-Italy, Greece, Spain and Portugal).  The possibility that this might happen are small, but as the article stated, "not zero." 

 

Tags: devolution, supranationalism, political, states, sovereignty, autonomy, Europe, unit 4 political.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:27 PM

Good for Scotland... as anyone that has watched Braveheart knows, all they need is Mel Gibson to fight for their independence, and they will surely win!  I know some people that play the bagpies, and I like the Scottish music better than much English music.  I don't know much about the UK, so I have little to guide me in favor or against Scotland declaring independence, but aw heck, why not...  The US declared independence, and it seemed to work out for them until... whenever...? forever? it depends on what you use as criteria to look at it...  But live and let live, let people do what they want, the only advice to that is not to let people harm others.  That way, true peace can be achieved.  Harmony, instead of harm.  So I would advocate for Scotland to wear women's clothing with turtle shells in their crotches and dance to celebrate their independence if that's what they want, as long as there are no epic battle sequences that precede or follow their dancing.  Don't be an elitist, open your eyes, the governments own your brothers and their lives... We must work to change this.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 8:42 PM

I had the pleasure of actually meeting a couple from Scotland who was in favor of Scotland's independence. I asked them what they thought would happen to their relationship with England and the rest of the European union.  The woman told me that they were uncertain of what would happen exactly but it would still be worth the shot, that she was willing to risk it to just be Scotland, and the UK because she identified with Scotland.

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How the letters of the alphabet got their names

How the letters of the alphabet got their names | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
There seems to be little predictability to the English names for the letters of the alphabet, to say nothing of the names of letters in other languages. Some begin with an e-as-in-egg sound (eff, ell); some end in an ee sound (tee, dee); and others have no obvious rhyme or reason to them at all. How did they get that way?

 

Tags: language, culture, historical, English.


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How Instagram Is Changing the Way We Design Cultural Spaces

How Instagram Is Changing the Way We Design Cultural Spaces | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"As neighborhoods, restaurants and museums become more photogenic, are we experiencing an 'Instagramization' of the world?"

 

Penang is one of a number of cities capitalizing on the wild popularity of photo-based social media apps such as Instagram, which has 800 million users (that’s more than a tenth of the world’s population). It’s part of a wider phenomenon of public and private spaces being designed to appeal to users of such apps. This phenomenon is subtly changing our visual landscapes—on the streets, in restaurants, in stores, in museums and more. Call it the “Instagramization” of the world.

Restaurants have been at the forefront of Instagramization. Since social media mentions can make or break a restaurant’s success, owners have become attuned to what visual aspects of food and décor appeal to customers. Restaurant designers are going for photo-friendly background materials like slate and whitewashed wood, and using plain white plates. Some are deliberately incorporating Instagram-appealing visuals that feature the restaurant’s name or logo—floor tiles, neon signs—hoping they’ll wind up in a snap.

 

Tags:  social media, place, culture, architecture, urban.


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Olivia Campanella's curator insight, January 25, 12:12 PM

Over the course of years Instagram has become increasingly popular and especially in Penang. Penang is one out many cities capitalizing on photo based social media such as Instagram. This phenomenon is changing our landscapes, streets, museums, in restauraunts and stores. We call it Instagramization.

James Piccolino's curator insight, January 25, 7:38 PM
I am admittedly a little bit torn on whether this is a good or bad thing. This "Instagramization" does drive art and restaurants to look better, but is it for the right reasons? I have an Instagram, and I do these very same things, but I still have to question the motivations. Are we appreciating art again for the right reasons? Long ago we as humans had an appreciation for art stretching all the way back to cave paintings on walls, long before social media. This trend of only now getting so much into art seems to be more for personal branding, showing off, and trying to impress our friends/followers, maybe even impress ourselves on a deeper level. If we did not hashtag and get likes for our artsy pictures, would we still be so ready to post them, or love them? Do we love the creative world around us? Or do we love what the art around us does for us? There is nothing really wrong with either, but it is a question to consider. The restaurants and tourist spots would probably say "Who cares?" and who could really blame them? They benefit, which is a great thing. I guess when it comes down to it, whether it is for ourselves or for a love of various forms of expression, it is a nice thing that humanity is getting into art again.
Matt Manish's curator insight, January 31, 4:13 PM
This article helps to explain the interesting topic of social media in this current age and how it is shaping our culture. Author of the article Emily Matchar points out how many places in big cities are becoming more and more visually appealing for tourists and customers to come and take pictures for Instagram. She further gives examples of this by how restaurants are putting much more thought into designing their establishments than ever before in hopes that their customers will take a picture there and upload it Instagram. These, restaurants are also creating dishes and beverages that are more colorful as well as pleasing to look at to encourage their customers to post a picture of their food online. Posting these pictures online benefits these restaurants by helping increase their presence online leading to a potentially larger customer base. Matchar goes on to say how this not only changes the way restaurants are trying to use social media to their advantage, but how many other businesses and public places are trying to as well. Pointing out that even museums are coming up with more interactive exhibits for attendees to take pictures of. Overall, I found that this article had an insightful view into the power of social media and how it is molding the way we look at things in our world.
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Hong Kong's 'coffin homes' reveal a housing crisis

Hong Kong's 'coffin homes' reveal a housing crisis | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
A shortage of developable land have pushed Hong Kong's housing prices skyward, leading some to live in spaces the size of closets.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 7, 2017 1:39 PM

Overpopulation doesn't feel like a serious issue when you live in a land characterized by wide open spaces, but in some densely settled urban centers, the issues become quite personal.  Hong Kong is currently facing a housing shortage. This article nicely explains the difficulties that living in the so-called coffin homes makes for the residents.  This photo gallery humanizes this difficult living condition.

 

Tags: housingurban, place, neighborhoodspatialdensity, planning, density, urbanism.

HumdeBut's curator insight, February 6, 8:54 AM
Hopefully we have more space in Europe and elsewhere (Canada !).
For me, living in these conditions : non !!!
Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 8:35 PM
The photo gallery in this article helps to give an accurate depiction of the housing crisis in Hong Kong with many people living in units that are 4 by 6 feet. Many families have to live in separate units because they are so small and can't usually fit more than one person. The bright side of the housing crisis in Hong Kong is that these "coffin homes" allow people to live in the major city at a cheaper cost, although it definitely comes with a hefty price with such tiny living quarters. The future looks positive though, as Hong Kong promises to build over 400,000 new homes over the next decade. This will help improve the housing crisis and hopefully phase these "coffin homes" out of existence once and for all.
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The Real Threat to Hinduism: The Slow Death of India's Rivers

The Real Threat to Hinduism: The Slow Death of India's Rivers | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

Hinduism shares an intricate, intimate relationship with the climate, geography, and biodiversity of South Asia; its festivals, deities, mythology, scriptures, calendar, rituals, and even superstitions are rooted in nature. There is a strong bond between Hinduism and South Asia’s forests, wildlife, rivers, seasons, mountains, soils, climate, and richly varied geography, which is manifest in the traditional layout of a typical Hindu household’s annual schedule. Hinduism’s existence is tied to all of these natural entities, and more prominently, to South Asia’s rivers.

 

Hinduism as a religion celebrates nature’s bounty, and what could be more representative of nature’s bounty than a river valley? South Asian rivers have sustained and nourished Hindu civilizations for centuries. They are responsible for our prosperous agriculture, timely monsoons, diverse aquatic ecosystems, riverine trade and commerce, and cultural richness.  Heavily dammed, drying in patches, infested by sand mafia and land grabbers, poisoned by untreated sewage and industrial waste, and hit by climate change — our rivers, the cradle of Hinduism, are in a sorry state.

 

If there is ever a threat to Hinduism, this is it. Destroy South Asia’s rivers and with it, Hinduism’s history and mythology will be destroyed. Rituals will turn into mockery, festivals, a farce, and Hinduism itself, a glaring example of man’s hypocritical relationship with nature. The fact that we worship our rivers as mothers and then choke them to death with all sorts of filth is already eminent.


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, January 4, 8:18 PM

Environmental change and human impacts 

Reasons for effective management 

Brian Weekley's comment, January 5, 9:26 AM
Seth- here is another article from a few years back about this same thing. http://www.newsweek.com/2015/10/02/ganges-river-dying-under-weight-modern-india-375347.html
Matt Manish's curator insight, February 1, 2:31 PM
Gauri Noolkar, explains in this article how much of Hinduism is related to India's nature, and how influential the Indian continent's river systems are on the country's leading religion. Noolkar, informs her audience about how pollution and greed for natural resources is killing the riverbeds of India. Which ultimately is leading to a negative impact on Hinduism in India, since much of the religion is influenced by the country's many rivers. For example, numerous Hindus make pilgrimages to and along the many famous rivers of India. Also, there are many religious sites erected next to rivers in India such as ghats which are stairs leading down into these rivers. These pilgrimages and religious sites are being affected by India's rivers by being dammed, polluted, dried up, and filled with toxic waste. Noolkar concludes her article by proclaiming that if Hinduism in India is to survive, drastic steps need to be taken in order to restore and preserve India's ancient river basins.
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xkcd: A Critique of Viral Maps

xkcd: A Critique of Viral Maps | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 20, 2017 3:10 PM

This 'map' is a pithy and quite pointed critique of the many maps that get shared on social media claiming to be based on big data, but they might be more fluff than true substance. 

 

Tags: XKCD, infographic, mapping, social media, cartography.

Bridget Barker's curator insight, November 30, 2017 11:14 AM
I heart xkcd
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State Borders

State Borders | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 16, 2017 3:06 PM

I imagine most geographers have wanted to tinker with state or international borders to 'fix them' in one way or another...but if any 'correction' were to be made, whose criteria would be used?  Which people in which regions would be upset by the changes?  Historical inertia is a power force in maintaining the status quo. When France was preparing to consolidate it's administrative regions, 68% recognized that consolidating regional administration would be more efficient but 77% didn't want it to impact their own local region.

 

Tags: XKCD, art, mapping, cartography, borders, political.

Taylor Doonan's curator insight, February 4, 3:12 PM
Though it would be "pretty" if the state borders all looked like Colorado or Wyoming because they're cookie cutter squares this cannot be a reality. I've heard many times from different people "why don't all the states have more geometric borders like those of the western part of the United States." this is due to borders being created without thought of what they would look like on a map. When people founded the original states there were many territorial disputes which resulted in the eastern states looking the way they do, then when manifest destiny began and the US expanded the states began to look more "pretty". Though it would be "pretty" making all the states look like Colorado or Wyoming cannot be done because if we decided to recreate these borders who would be the person to make these changes and what happens to the people that did not move but now live in a different state, and what happens to the representation of these changing states, there are too many factors that would make it more work than it is worth to geometrisize the states. 
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When Rich Places Want to Secede

When Rich Places Want to Secede | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
At the core of Catalonia’s separatist movement is an argument that a country’s better-off regions shouldn’t have to pay to cover their less productive counterparts.

 

As a relatively rich region with its own independence movement, Catalonia's not alone: A small set of secession movements in historically productive areas, most visibly in Europe, say they’d be better off on their own, and more are pointing to Catalonia's example to regain momentum.

The common wisdom used to be that separatist movements mostly came from weak minorities that rallied around racial or ethnic injustices. “With globalization, that changed significantly,” said Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics (LSE). “Virtually everywhere in the world,” movements have swapped out the “identity card” for the “economic card.”

Inequality between regions is baked into the entire concept of modern nationhood—if subsidizing poorer parts of a country were motivation enough to split off, every region would have done it by now. Plus, there are economic perks to staying together: Trade is easier across internal borders, and diversified regions diffuse risk.

 

Tags: Catalonia, economic, political, devolution, autonomy, Europe.


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David G Tibbs's curator insight, January 18, 7:17 PM

Countries have a right to request independence if the host nation is failing its duties. If the people of Catalonia feel like they can run their own land then they should. This movement is also a string of many different separates movements globally. We are seeing this because of a increase in national identity. People are tired of giving up their  “identity card” for the “economic card.”

Matt Manish's curator insight, January 18, 7:36 PM
In Spain, citizens of Catalonia are seeking secession from Spain for economic purposes. The citizen's of Catalonia are wealthier than most of the rest of the country. Catalonia pays $12 billion more in taxes a year to Madrid than they receive back from Madrid. This seems like a great idea for the citizens of Catalonia because it would help increase their economy in a positive way, but this could have a negative effect on the rest of the country's economy as far as trade goes. Also, this article points out that if secession because of economic differences in regions of a country made enough sense and were easy to do, countries would be doing more all throughout history. From what I can it see, even though Catalonia pays more in taxes every year to Madrid, it would make sense for the nation as a whole for Catalonia not to secede, because if it did it would hurt the economy of the majority of the nation.
Taylor Doonan's curator insight, February 16, 8:32 AM
This article is focused on Catalonia and its hopes for secession from Spain. Catalonia wants to secede because it pays in much more than it receives from the government. Catalonia is the wealthiest part of Spain with the exception of Madrid, and they feel as if they are paying to support the poorer regions of Spain, who they believe do not work as hard. The article also references other countries where wealth is unevenly distributed and how this can cause regions to want secession, it also outlines things that would need to happen for secession to be possible, for example another country offering military protection. In the case of Catalonia if they were to secede, what is left of Spain could plummet, they would lose 20% of their GDP overnight, which could cause massive problems for the country. Spain needs to begin preparing for if a Catalonian secession does in fact happen.  
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Divided island: How Haiti and the DR became two worlds

Haiti and the Dominican Republic share a border, and an island. But the two countries are very different today: the Dominican Republic enjoys higher quality of life for many factors than Haiti. I went to this island and visited both countries, to try and understand when and how their paths diverged.

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Nicole Canova's curator insight, February 9, 5:13 PM
Despite sharing one island, Haiti and the Dominican Republic are very different ethnically, economically, ecologically, and culturally.  This can be attributed to a variety of factors, including the two countries' different colonial legacies and the struggles Haiti faced in its unstable infancy as the world's first black republic (massive debt, blatant racism, deforestation, and depleted soil and other resources).  Though Haiti managed to pay off its debt to France, Haitians continue to face a variety of factors that have destabilized the country politically and economically and continue to prevent Haiti from achieving the same level of success as the Dominican Republic, such as their lack of natural resources and poor soil, as well as continued racism and discrimination from their Dominican neighbors.
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, February 13, 8:41 PM
This video is extremely interesting seeing as it points out the differences between two very different worlds that are only separated by a single border. The video shows how racist the Dominicans are to their neighbors and shows us how the Haitians live under such scrutiny. On each end of the border, there are two markets that are supposed to allow both the Haitians and the Dominicans to trade their goods, however, the strict border patrol officers keep the Haitians from entering until their neighbors have set up their shops at the best spots. The director of the video also notes that he believes the reason Haiti is much poorer than the Dominican Republic stems all the way back to when they were colonies of France and Spain. 
Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 12:47 PM
I found this video to be very insightful into the relationship Haiti has with the Dominican Republic and how the Haitian government has formed into what it is today. It was especially informative for myself because I didn't know very much about these countries before watching this video. I knew Haiti was the first slave colony to have a successful revolt against their slave holders, but I didn't know or realize all the consequences of that slave uprising. It seems like Haiti wasn't given a proper chance right off the bat to succeed as a nation. The French overworked their land and destroyed the soil which is still a problem today. Once Haiti declared independence, many nations enforced embargoes on Haiti because it was considered a threat due to it being a black republic, which strangled their potential for a strong economy. Adding to that France demanded a large sum of money from Haiti after they declared independence because France was upset about losing profits from the colony, which hindered the Haitian economy even more. It's too bad that Haiti got a bad hand of cards right from the beginning, I hope that one day they can rise above adversity, and truly flourish as a nation.
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What can Chinese cities learn from Singapore?

What can Chinese cities learn from Singapore? | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
Last week, I had the opportunity to attend the Singapore Urban Week along with other colleagues from the World Bank Beijing office, as well as delegates from China’s national government and participating cities. For all of us, this trip to Singapore was an eye-opening experience that highlighted the essential role of integrated urban planning in building sustainable cities, and provided practical solutions that can be readily adapted to help achieve each city’s own development vision. A couple of key lessons learned:
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xkcd: Map Projections

xkcd: Map Projections | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

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Mathijs Booden's curator insight, April 27, 2016 12:21 AM
Torn between Robinson and Hodo-Dyer.
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Why 80% of Singaporeans live in government-built flats

Why 80% of Singaporeans live in government-built flats | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
Lots of countries show off their public-housing projects, but few are quite as devoted to them as Singapore, where four-fifths of the permanent population live in subsidised units built by the government, most of them as owner-occupiers. The city-state’s suburbs bristle with HDB towers, painted calming pastel hues. This vast national housing system surprises visitors who think of Singapore as a low-tax hub for expatriate bankers and big multinationals. But HDB is a linchpin of economic and social policy and an anchor for the ruling People’s Action Party (PAP), which has led Singapore since independence. It is also a tantalising but tricky model for Singapore’s fast-urbanising neighbours to follow.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 10, 2017 12:39 PM

Singapore is such a fascinating case study.  Over 90% of the Singapore’s land is owned by the government and the American ideal of independent home ownership is seen as antithetical to cultural norms.  The government heavily subsidies young couples to live near their parents and create tight-knit communities with homelessness was eradicated (that’s the optimists’ perspective).  This is all well and good for young, straight couples that choose to support the ruling political party, but critics often point out that the housing focus has also created a paternalistic component to the government that is much stronger in Singapore than in other countries.  This article nicely goes with the 2017 APHG reading professional development talk entitled “The Geographies of Home” that focused on Singaporean and Japanese examples.    

 

Tag: Singapore, urban, neighborhood, economicplanning, housing, cultural norms.

Mr Mac's curator insight, July 24, 2017 9:26 AM
Unit 4 - Political, Government; Unit 7 - Urban Spaces, housing, Urban Planning
Cherise Chng's comment, August 27, 2017 9:50 AM
As a young Singaporean, I am really proud of such an unique architecture that is representable of Singapore. These flats, or what we call HDB, provides us with many Singaporeans with a roof over their head despite land scarcity in Singapore. Some HDB flats has a sky garden while majority of the others has a gathering area on the ground floor to provide an opportunity to mingle with our neighbours. It is truly a Singaporean memory to be living in a HDB flat.
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Why geography matters now more than ever

Why geography matters now more than ever | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"Students need to know human geography; they need to understand the relationships that exist between cultures."


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LRC's curator insight, September 4, 2017 6:08 PM
Share your insight
Ivan Ius's curator insight, September 5, 2017 11:38 AM
Geographic concepts: Patterns & Trends; Interrelationships; Geographic Perpsective
Uart.com's curator insight, September 8, 2017 5:22 AM

Geography is more important than ever to explain and understand the art market in globalization and digitization turn.

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Why Don’t We All Speak the Same Language?

Why Don’t We All Speak the Same Language? | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
There are 7,000 languages spoken on Earth. What are the costs — and benefits — of our modern-day Tower of Babel?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 21, 2017 10:40 AM

These two podcasts are great mainstream looks at issues that filled with cultural geography content.  So many languages on Earth is clearly inefficient (the EU spends $1 billion per year on translation), and yet, linguistic diversity is such a rich part of humanity's cultural heritage.  Listen to the first episode, Why Don't We All Speak the Same Language? as well as the follow-up episode, What Would Be the Best Universal Language?

 

Tags: languagecultureworldwide, English, regions, diffusiontechnology.

Andrew Kahn's curator insight, November 4, 2017 8:13 PM
Culture speaks louder than words
 
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Borders and the Arctic Ocean

The ice in the Arctic is disappearing. Melting Arctic ice means new economic opportunities: trade routes in the Arctic ocean, and access to natural resources. Because of this, the Arctic nations are now moving to expand their border claims. Russia has shown that it’s the most ambitious, using a potent combination of soft power and military buildup to advance its agenda. They’ve said the Arctic is rightfully theirs.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 9, 2017 10:02 AM

This video is the second video in "Vox borders" series that is shaping up to be an excellent resources for geography educators.  This focus is on Svalbard and Russia's designs within the Arctic, but this TestTube episode is a shorter version that emphasizes how receding summer ice is being seen as an economic opportunity for all maritime claims in the Arctic.  Canada, the U.S., Russia, and Denmark (Greenland) all are subtly expanding their maritime claims.

 

Questions to Ponder: How do borders impact the develop/preservation of the Arctic?  How should uninhabited lands and waters be administered politically?

 

 

Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 10:31 PM
Since the 1980's a significant amount of ice in Antarctic ocean has melted away. This is a big deal because this is causing the changing of borders in this part of the world. With all the ice melting in Antarctica, this opens up new shipping lanes with much faster routes. This also makes it much easier for to drill for natural resources such as gas and oil, that were once difficult to get to because they were covered in ice. This is causing countries like Russia, Canada, Finland, and others to desire for new borders to be drawn up, hopefully in favor of their nation. Russia has even started developing military bases on some of the coast line that is opening up in Antarctica. It will be interesting to see how the borders in the Arctic circle are going to change and how it will also effect world trade in that part of the world.
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How Does the U.S. Census Bureau Define Rural?

"The U.S. Census Bureau has designed a multimedia application experience, a story map, called 'Rural America: How Does the U.S. Census Bureau Define Rural?' This story map contains interactive web maps, tables, information, and images to help explain how the Census Bureau defines 'rural.' Many rural communities rely on American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year estimates, rather than ACS 1-year estimates, because of population thresholds. This story map helps data users understand the history and definition of 'rural.' Watch this video and then visit the story map to learn more." Visit the Story Map: http://go.usa.gov/x8yPZ  


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 17, 2017 11:19 AM

Census geography brings statistical data to life as seen in their newly designed interactive story map, called "Rural America: How Does the U.S. Census Bureau Define 'Rural?" Not only does this story map helps explain how the Census Bureau defines rural, but it displays some fantastic data that helps students to explore rural America.  Many APHG teachers refer to unit 5 as the "ag unit" but the full title, Agriculture, food production, and rural land use, certainly does highlight why this can be a valuable resource.  

 

Tags: rural, census, regions, mappingESRIStoryMap.

Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 10:57 PM
The U.S. Census Bureau defines "rural" as an area with less than 50,000 people living in it. The majority of the United States is actually considered rural while a small minority of the country is labeled as urban. But interestingly enough, most rural areas are clustered around urban areas rather than in random locations. It seems as though the further out one ventures out from the center of an urban area like a major city, the more the population begins to decrease. One can also see in the same situation, the area transition from urban to rural. U.S. Census data can tell us a lot about populations in rural and urban areas and the correlation between them which can be important to know for many reasons.
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How the letters of the alphabet got their names

How the letters of the alphabet got their names | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
There seems to be little predictability to the English names for the letters of the alphabet, to say nothing of the names of letters in other languages. Some begin with an e-as-in-egg sound (eff, ell); some end in an ee sound (tee, dee); and others have no obvious rhyme or reason to them at all. How did they get that way?

 

Tags: language, culture, historical, English.


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We’re creating cow islands

We’re creating cow islands | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
The parts of the United States that have higher populations of dairy cows are in the West and northern states.

 

Milk has moved away from cities between 2001 and 2011. Red areas indicate less milk in 2011 than 2001, green areas mean more and a buff color designates a neutral milk region.

Almost every region where you see a dark red area indicating a sharp decline in production has a large and growing population center nearby.


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ava smith's curator insight, January 8, 11:24 PM
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Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 9:09 PM
I've never really wondered which parts of the country produce the milk I consume on a regular basis. But as the maps in this article show there are certain parts of country that are densely populated with cows for the sole purpose of producing milk. This article also indicates that the "cow islands" in the Southeastern part of the United States are becoming smaller, while the density of the "cow islands" in the Northern and Western parts of the country are increasing at a significantly steady rate. While reading this article, I learned more about where the most cows in the U.S. are producing milk and how that might affect the price of the milk I buy.
Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, February 19, 1:44 PM
How would this relate to the Von Thunen model we discussed?
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The 'War on Sitting' Has a New Front

The 'War on Sitting' Has a New Front | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
Cities are removing benches in an effort to counter vagrancy and crime—at the same time that they’re adding them to make the public realm more age-friendly.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 1, 2017 3:35 PM

Geography explores more than just what countries control a certain territory and what landforms are there.  Geography explores the spatial manifestations of power and how place is crafted to fit a particular vision.  Homeless people are essentially always 'out of place.'  These articles from the Society Pages, Atlas Obscura, the Atlantic and this one from the Guardian share similar things: that urban planners actively design places that will discourage loitering, skate boarding, and homelessness, which are all undesirable to local businesses.  This gallery shows various defensive architectural tactics to make certain people feel 'out of place.'  Just to show that not all urban designs are anti-homeless, this bench is one that is designed to help the homeless (and here is an ingenious plan to curb public urination).  

    

Tags: urbanplanning, architecture, landscape, place, poverty.

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Kazakhstan to switch from Cyrillic to Latin alphabet

Kazakhstan to switch from Cyrillic to Latin alphabet | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"Kazakh was written in Arabic script until 1920 when it was substituted by the Latin alphabet. In 1940, it was replaced by a Cyrillic one. 'Given that over 100 countries in the world use the Latin script, it is crucial for Kazakhstan's integration into the global educational and economic environment,' said Gulnar Karbozova.

The former Soviet Republic declared independence in 1991. Its state language is Kazakh, a member of the Turkic family.

Yet, Russian is widely spoken across Kazakhstan and is its second official language."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 31, 2017 3:45 PM

Having to translate your language into another is one level of cultural difference, but having to change into another writing system (transliteration) adds an extra layer of foreignness that makes interactions more difficult.  Kazakhstan, a with a history of connections to the Middle East and Russia, is now making a choice that appears to signal greater connection to the larger global community.  This is not going to be an easy transitions, as as this additional BBC article notes, the choice comes with plenty of advantages and disadvantages

 

Tags: languagecultureworldwide, regions, Central Asia, Kazakhstan.

Richard Aitchison's curator insight, February 21, 1:42 PM
Interesting to see how this switch could be key in Kazakhstan transition to integrate more into the world. The former soviet republic which became independent in 1991 will move away from its Cyrillic alphabet and switch to a Latin alphabet by 2020. Language is so important, especially as we become more of a global world and while language itself can be a barrier, a different alphabet can cause even more issues. This seems to be a good move for the Soviet republic. As explained in the article it still has many times to its past as the second most spoken language in the country in Russian. It is important however to not switch to fast, as you do not want to make your own citizens behind as it will be an adjustment period for all in the switch. Its still pretty unbelievable it has take countries over 30 years to really turn the corner from being a former Soviet republic and some still trying to overcome some of those previous conditions.
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Singapore passport becomes 'most powerful' in the world

Singapore passport becomes 'most powerful' in the world | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

Historically, the top ten most powerful passports in the world were mostly European, with Germany having the lead for the past two years. Since early 2017, Singapore has tied for number one position with Germany. For the first time ever an Asian country has the most powerful passport in the world. It is a testament of Singapore's inclusive diplomatic relations and effective foreign policy."

 

Tag: Singapore, SouthEastAsia, political, development.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 26, 2017 10:02 PM

Who else is high on the list of the most powerful passports in the world?  This tier system is based on the number of visa-free entries available to the holder of the visa:

1. Singapore

2. Germany

3. Sweden

3. South Korea

4. Denmark

4. Finland

4. Italy

4. France

4. Spain

4. Norway

4. Japan

4. United Kingdom

5. Luxembourg

5. Switzerland

5. Netherlands

5. Belgium

5. Austria

5. Poland

6. Malaysia

6. Ireland

6. USA (that's tied for 19th for you competitive sorts)

6. Canada

7. Greece

7. New Zealand

7. Australia

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Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages

Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 29, 2017 8:50 AM
Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages
Ziggi Ivan Santini's curator insight, November 30, 2017 4:00 AM

This infographic is a great way to visualize the dominant languages on Earth.

LLewe LLyn Cooper's curator insight, January 14, 10:07 PM
Languages all over the world
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Where is the riskiest place to live?

Where is the riskiest place to live? | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
The world risk index reveals which countries are most at risk from rising sea levels and the increasing frequency of floods, droughts and storms

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Who benefits from globalization?

1. The very rich and 2. the middle class in emerging economies.
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Announcing a New Feature to Build Students’ Geography Skills

Announcing a New Feature to Build Students’ Geography Skills | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"As the image above shows, The Times reports from all over the globe. We have journalists in more than 30 international news bureaus worldwide, and every day we publish news, feature stories, videos, slide shows and more from dozens of countries around the world. Our new 'Country of the Week' feature celebrates this abundance to help build students’ geography skills. A weekly interactive quiz will first introduce students to a country via a recent video or photograph, then ask them to find that place on a map. Next, the quiz will focus on the demographics and culture of the country. Finally, we’ll include links to recent reporting from that place in case they, or you, would like to go further.

In 'Why Geography Matters,' Harm de Blij wrote that geography is 'a superb antidote to isolationism and provincialism,' and argued that 'the American public is the geographically most illiterate society of consequence on the planet, at a time when United States power can affect countries and peoples around the world.'

This spatial illiteracy, geographers say, can leave citizens without a framework to think about foreign policy questions more substantively. 'The paucity of geographical knowledge means there is no check on misleading public representations about international matters,' said Alec Murphy, a professor of geography at the University of Oregon."

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, geography matters.


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bintathletics's comment, September 11, 2017 1:46 AM
good
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The World Bank is eliminating the term “developing country” from its data vocabulary

The World Bank is eliminating the term “developing country” from its data vocabulary | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"In the 2016 edition of its World Development Indicators, the World Bank has made a big choice: It’s no longer distinguishing between 'developed' countries and “developing” ones in the presentation of its data. The change marks an evolution in thinking about the geographic distribution of poverty and prosperity. But it sounds less radical when you consider that nobody has ever agreed on a definition for these terms in the first place. The International Monetary Fund says its own distinction between advanced and emerging market economies “is not based on strict criteria, economic or otherwise.” The United Nations doesn’t have an official definition of a developing country, despite slapping the label on 159 nations. And the World Bank itself had previously simply lumped countries in the bottom two-thirds of gross national income (GNI) into the category, but even that comparatively strict cut-off wasn’t very useful."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 25, 2017 1:38 PM

Labels and categories are so often problematic, but they are also necessary to make sense of the vast amount of information.  Regional geography is inherently about lumping places together that have commonalities, but acknowledging that many differences from place to place makes the world infinitely varied and complex.  Since we can’t process an infinite amount of complexity, we categorize, for better or for worse.  In education, we are continually trying to show how some categorizations fail, hoping that our students will categorize the information they receive in better ways (non-racist ways for example).  The regional terms we use--Latin America, the Middle East, Europe, etc.—impacts how we think about the world.  Each of those terms highlights a few similarities and ignores some important differences.  The terms More Developed Countries (MDCs), Newly Industrialized Countries (NICs), and Less Developed (LDCs) is how many people have socioeconomically categorized the world’s countries, some preferring developing countries instead of LDCs because it less stigmatizing.  In 2015, many at the World Bank have thought that the term “Developing Countries” obscures more than it reveals.  In 2016, the World Bank removed the term from its database since there are more differences than similarities in the economic structures and trajectories of developing countries.         

 

Questions to Ponder: What are some of the major problems that you see with the term developing country?  Even with its problems, what utility is there in the term?  Will you keep using the term or will you abandon it?  How come? 

 

Tagsdevelopment, statistics, economicindustry.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 29, 2017 3:06 AM

Global challenges: Development

James Piccolino's curator insight, February 8, 6:51 AM
I agree that it is important to categorize in order to learn and group things together. I understand some of the implications but it is nonetheless important to the way we learn about other areas. To do away with all labels of this kind will not make the topic and world view more inclusive, but instead make things so complicated that people will either not understand it or not bother with it's complexities. Things need to be distinguished between qualities and traits in order for proper analysis.