Human Geography is Everything!
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Why 80% of Singaporeans live in government-built flats

Why 80% of Singaporeans live in government-built flats | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
Lots of countries show off their public-housing projects, but few are quite as devoted to them as Singapore, where four-fifths of the permanent population live in subsidised units built by the government, most of them as owner-occupiers. The city-state’s suburbs bristle with HDB towers, painted calming pastel hues. This vast national housing system surprises visitors who think of Singapore as a low-tax hub for expatriate bankers and big multinationals. But HDB is a linchpin of economic and social policy and an anchor for the ruling People’s Action Party (PAP), which has led Singapore since independence. It is also a tantalising but tricky model for Singapore’s fast-urbanising neighbours to follow.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 10, 12:39 PM

Singapore is such a fascinating case study.  Over 90% of the Singapore’s land is owned by the government and the American ideal of independent home ownership is seen as antithetical to cultural norms.  The government heavily subsidies young couples to live near their parents and create tight-knit communities with homelessness was eradicated (that’s the optimists’ perspective).  This is all well and good for young, straight couples that choose to support the ruling political party, but critics often point out that the housing focus has also created a paternalistic component to the government that is much stronger in Singapore than in other countries.  This article nicely goes with the 2017 APHG reading professional development talk entitled “The Geographies of Home” that focused on Singaporean and Japanese examples.    

 

Tag: Singapore, urban, neighborhood, economicplanning, housing, cultural norms.

Mr Mac's curator insight, July 24, 9:26 AM
Unit 4 - Political, Government; Unit 7 - Urban Spaces, housing, Urban Planning
Cherise Chng's comment, August 27, 9:50 AM
As a young Singaporean, I am really proud of such an unique architecture that is representable of Singapore. These flats, or what we call HDB, provides us with many Singaporeans with a roof over their head despite land scarcity in Singapore. Some HDB flats has a sky garden while majority of the others has a gathering area on the ground floor to provide an opportunity to mingle with our neighbours. It is truly a Singaporean memory to be living in a HDB flat.
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Superblocks to the rescue: Barcelona’s plan to give streets back to residents

Superblocks to the rescue: Barcelona’s plan to give streets back to residents | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"The Catalan capital’s radical new strategy will restrict traffic to a number of big roads, drastically reducing pollution and turning secondary streets into ‘citizen spaces’ for culture, leisure and the community.  Black routes allow public transport and cars at 50km/h, while green routes only allow private vehicles at 10km/h to prioritize pedestrians and cycling."

 

Tags: Catalonia, Spain, mobility, transportation, place, neighborhood, urban, planning, urbanism.


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The economic threat to cities isn't gentrification; it's the opposite

The economic threat to cities isn't gentrification; it's the opposite | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
Many urban neighborhoods are places of concentrated poverty, and it's killing opportunity in the US.

 

American cities are growing, and as they grow, they're adding lots of high-poverty neighborhoods. Nearly three times as many "high-poverty" census tracts existed in 2010 as in 1970.  That's unsettling on its face but even more so when you see the havoc a poor neighborhood can wreak on a resident's chances at a good life. Forget gentrification — this is a bigger problem. 

 

The chart above tallies up the people living in these neighborhoods in 1970 and 2010. What it shows is that the number of people living in high-poverty neighborhoods — those with poverty rates of 30 percent or more — has roughly doubled since 1970. That's because these neighborhoods of concentrated poverty have a tendency to stay that way, even while new ones sprout up.

 

Tags: urban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, poverty, place, socioeconomic, neighborhood.


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Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty

Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:59 AM

See where the wealth and poverty are in America using this great map.

Chandrima Roy's curator insight, January 9, 2014 10:44 PM

wonderful

 

Ishwer Singh's curator insight, January 20, 2014 6:56 AM

This picture shows the cocentrations of poverty and affluence.  The areas hilighted in yellow show the areas which are wealthy and the dark blue showing the poor. This coincides with the amout of pay and the education levels in these countries. Areas such as Boston, New York and Washington show high cocentrations of affluence. These areas also have much higher education systems and more well -paid jobs. Countries which are highlighted in dark blue are countries with lesser education and lesser paid jobs. This shows the  extent at which poverty can affect a country.

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LANDFILL HARMONIC: Inspiring dreams one note at a time!

A heartfelt & moving story of how instruments made from recycled trash bring hope to children whose future is otherwise spiritless.

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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 2014 12:11 PM

This is really cool.  You would think that people living on a pile of trash would be really miserable and have a negative outlook on life, which in a way these kids probably do.  However they have found a way to bring joy to their lives and bring them closer together.  Going through the trash they are sometimes lucky enough to find actual instruments that have been thrown away, but more times than others only find pieces they can use.  Taking the pieces of trash that they find and turning them into instruments to make music is the highlight of most of these kids day.  They go to show that they can live in the worst of the worst but that doesn't mean that that will stop them from becoming something in life.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:59 AM

It is fascinating to see how a community living in very poor conditions have found a way to make their society and culture flourish. Where most residents make a living sorting through garbage, they have found a way to use that same trash to create instruments and an orchestra, adding rich culture to their community and giving the youth opportunities they would not have otherwise. It shows that while a community may live in less than ideal conditions, it is still possible to have a thriving culture.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 12:58 PM

this story is a wonderful example of how even in a horribly impoverished area people can still make art, and overcome massive hardships to chase something they truly want.

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Gentrification spelled out

Gentrification spelled out | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
As upscale, high-rise condos and hipster bars opened nearby, longtime customers joked: Is this really still “the ’hood”? Not anymore.

 

In a gentrifying neighborhood in Washington D.C. that was historically African-American, Fish in the ’Hood was an iconic restaurant that captured the feel of the area.  Just this May, the storefront restaurant was renamed Fish in the Neighborhood.

Questions to Ponder: Why?  Does it matter?  What does it mean?


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, September 25, 2014 5:35 PM

Gentrification deals with the forcing out of lower income residents and making space available for the more affluent. The re-naming of Fish in the 'Hood shows how gentrification forces the culture  of entire communities to change. Although this restaurant was popular before, they were forced to re-brand so they can stay in business. Gentrification exiles the poor, with that their culture. This restaurant shows that, as more upscale business open up to service the needs of more affluent citizens, any business that has the perception of being the contrary will soon be out of business. This matters because it shows how gentrification destroys communities image, and culture for the sake of increasing revenue and real estate value. What is exhibit here is not only a socio-economic shift but also a racial shift as well. This neighborhood was predominately African American before it began to gentrify, "The 'Hood" is a saying that correlates with African American culture. This restaurant's re-branding shows that they no longer can continue to bring in customers with a name that is part of the African American vernacular. Furthermore, it shows the racial trends that go with gentrification where minority culture is pushed out as more money flows in.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 25, 2015 11:15 AM

The article talks about a restaurant called Fish In The NeighborHood, with emphasis on Hood, that has not been affected by the gentrification that has happened in the area. He still refers to the area as "Hood" even with all the newly built building. The article also describes the process of the gentrification, and people's opinions on the name of the restaurant compared to the area.

 

This article relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it explains the idea and process of gentrification. It gives an example of how some buildings are unaffected by the gentrified area. 

Savannah Rains's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:50 AM

this article is taking the time to plainly spell out what gentrification is and where it is happening. Gentrification means the taking of lowe class land and making it more valuable to try and boost the overall way of life in that area. Most people are blind to this system and should take the time to learn about it. 

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Crafting a Sense of Place

Crafting a Sense of Place | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"Talk about creating a sense of place! This neighborhood in #Covington draws on German roots to create a restaurant/pub district. Even the non-German restaurants in the area evoke an old world cultural landscape aesthetic in a way that makes the neighborhood appealing to visitors and prospective residents. #culturallandscape #placemaking."

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 31, 2016 10:45 PM

I love exploring the cultural landscapes in and around Cincinnati every year during the #APHGreading.   

 

Tags: neighborhoodlandscapeurban, place, social media, APHG, Cincinnati

 

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Superblocks to the rescue: Barcelona’s plan to give streets back to residents

Superblocks to the rescue: Barcelona’s plan to give streets back to residents | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"The Catalan capital’s radical new strategy will restrict traffic to a number of big roads, drastically reducing pollution and turning secondary streets into ‘citizen spaces’ for culture, leisure and the community.  Black routes allow public transport and cars at 50km/h, while green routes only allow private vehicles at 10km/h to prioritize pedestrians and cycling."

 

Tags: Catalonia, Spain, mobility, transportation, place, neighborhood, urban, planning, urbanism.


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The Mystery House

"In Raleigh, N.C., there's a house... or what looks like a house. What's hidden inside is more important than most people realize. Read the story: http://wunc.org/post/video-whats-inside-house-wade-avenue "


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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 25, 2014 10:06 AM

A great introduction to city planning

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/01/17/263476645/whats-inside-this-mystery-house-in-north-carolina

 

 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 27, 2014 4:11 PM

This short YouTube clip focuses on the Governments creative ways of keeping city planning out of the eyes of everyday people. Not only do these creative ways allow cities to remain unvandalised, but they also eliminate the eye sores of waterplants and towers. I think these ideas are great and allow communities to remain beautiful and inviting. 

Tracy Galvin's comment, January 30, 2014 3:00 PM
This is a really nice example of a respect for the neighborhood. By disguising the building it doesn't create an eyesore in the community but will allow the plant to provide a service to the neighbors. This keeps property values high and the neighbors happy.
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Urban Exploration

Urban Exploration | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"The French have a wonderful word—flâneur—for someone who seeks to explore and understand the nature of a city’s landscape, usually by taking spontaneous adventures amidst the ebb and flow of life going on around them. In this week’s theme we invite you to lose yourself reading about the flâneur-esque adventures of Maptia’s streetwise connoisseurs and explore a myriad of cities through their eyes."


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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 1, 2013 12:29 AM

This article demonstrates that there are so many places around the world yet to visit and it is important to plan and save as soon as possible becuase seeing all the beautiful cities of the world ma ytake several years, so preperation in is a must, From Cities in Asia, to Paris, London, Russia and Turkey you will be able to travel on festive dates and examine the landscapes that define these beautiful metropolises. From Cathedrals, to Big Ben, and Haggia Sophia in Instanbul, one will be marveled by the multicutural beauty and night life that exists around the world

Helen Rowling's curator insight, December 1, 2013 8:18 PM

Gr8 immersion of stories of lives in other countries.

Tony Gough's curator insight, December 9, 2013 6:09 AM

Travel the world and read the short stories to learn more!

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Landfill Harmonic


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Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 12, 2015 7:02 PM

Here in Cateura, Paraguay the inhabitants live on a landfill. the quote in the begining of the video says, "the world sends us garbage, we send back music", and it couldn't be more accurate than that. citizens recycle the garbage and sell it. it is very inspiring to see these people make the best of their situation, when a lot of people in America complain about traffic, and menial problems. While going through the trash a violin shell was found which sparked imagination. people started to make instruments like violins, flutes, and cellos. Cateura now has a whole recycled orchestra that makes beautiful sounds. hearing and seeing this wonderful progress from thrown away items, i wonder what Americans could produce with the trash that is thrown away here. with the highest point in RI the Johnston Landfill, we must have some good trash. 

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 2015 7:54 PM

It is amazing on how these slum residents have a brilliant idea in how to convert waste and trash into a gorgeous music. Imagination plays a giant roll into poverty. People need to subsist and imagination makes this possible by taking anything in their environment and having it serve a particular purpose. The high percentage of contamination in this pollute field is another pressing matter, however this issue does not stop residents from pursuing their dreams. Enhancing their skills in music by making musical instruments out of trash, allows them to escape from their problems. In this little town in Paraguay, poverty and excess waste is prevalent in this society, but the residents take advantage of their waste polluted fields and make musical instruments out of what they find in them. Furthermore, this ingenuity helps children and improves their overall quality of life.

 

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:19 PM
After seeing this video, I have come to realize that here in America, we take so much for granted and complain about the smallest of things that do not go the way wanted, most Americans always want the newest and best of things whether it be cars, houses or electronics. Here in this video, you can just see the happiness these kids have and the joy that is brought to their lives using junk, literally junk. Their instruments are made from broken instruments or pieces of garbage picked from the landfill that could make the instruments. The fact that they are poor, live in slums and can have such joy in their lives, should be an eye opener for us here in America so that we stop taking our lives for granted and realize if people can be poor and find joy out of junk, then we can stop being selfish and take pride and joy in what we have even if it is not the newest and greatest thing on the market.
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Gentrification spelled out

Gentrification spelled out | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
As upscale, high-rise condos and hipster bars opened nearby, longtime customers joked: Is this really still “the ’hood”? Not anymore.

 

In a gentrifying neighborhood in Washington D.C. that was historically African-American, Fish in the ’Hood was an iconic restaurant that captured the feel of the area.  Just this May, the storefront restaurant was renamed Fish in the Neighborhood.

Questions to Ponder: Why?  Does it matter?  What does it mean?


Via Seth Dixon, Steve Perkins
more...
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, September 25, 2014 5:35 PM

Gentrification deals with the forcing out of lower income residents and making space available for the more affluent. The re-naming of Fish in the 'Hood shows how gentrification forces the culture  of entire communities to change. Although this restaurant was popular before, they were forced to re-brand so they can stay in business. Gentrification exiles the poor, with that their culture. This restaurant shows that, as more upscale business open up to service the needs of more affluent citizens, any business that has the perception of being the contrary will soon be out of business. This matters because it shows how gentrification destroys communities image, and culture for the sake of increasing revenue and real estate value. What is exhibit here is not only a socio-economic shift but also a racial shift as well. This neighborhood was predominately African American before it began to gentrify, "The 'Hood" is a saying that correlates with African American culture. This restaurant's re-branding shows that they no longer can continue to bring in customers with a name that is part of the African American vernacular. Furthermore, it shows the racial trends that go with gentrification where minority culture is pushed out as more money flows in.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 25, 2015 11:15 AM

The article talks about a restaurant called Fish In The NeighborHood, with emphasis on Hood, that has not been affected by the gentrification that has happened in the area. He still refers to the area as "Hood" even with all the newly built building. The article also describes the process of the gentrification, and people's opinions on the name of the restaurant compared to the area.

 

This article relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it explains the idea and process of gentrification. It gives an example of how some buildings are unaffected by the gentrified area. 

Savannah Rains's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:50 AM

this article is taking the time to plainly spell out what gentrification is and where it is happening. Gentrification means the taking of lowe class land and making it more valuable to try and boost the overall way of life in that area. Most people are blind to this system and should take the time to learn about it.