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Hong Kong's 'coffin homes' reveal a housing crisis

Hong Kong's 'coffin homes' reveal a housing crisis | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
A shortage of developable land have pushed Hong Kong's housing prices skyward, leading some to live in spaces the size of closets.

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Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 8:35 PM
The photo gallery in this article helps to give an accurate depiction of the housing crisis in Hong Kong with many people living in units that are 4 by 6 feet. Many families have to live in separate units because they are so small and can't usually fit more than one person. The bright side of the housing crisis in Hong Kong is that these "coffin homes" allow people to live in the major city at a cheaper cost, although it definitely comes with a hefty price with such tiny living quarters. The future looks positive though, as Hong Kong promises to build over 400,000 new homes over the next decade. This will help improve the housing crisis and hopefully phase these "coffin homes" out of existence once and for all.
Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 29, 9:31 AM
Now this is a major housing crisis. I thought apartments in NYC were small, but nothing like this. In Hong Kong they have what is called "coffin homes" they are stacked on top of each other to try to fit as many in as possible. With increasing population and just 7% of the land properly zoned for housing it caused a major crunch in the housing market. Currently prices are going for $1,350 per square foot. Obviously this is a major problem and causes living conditions to be brutal especially for the elderly or for families that have to split up due to space. So what to do to fix this problem? Well one would say just make more land available for housing, well that comes with problems as well. There probably is a reason that there is limited land for housing due to geographical issues. So yes we can build more homes, but would we run into new problems such as natural disasters that cause more debt for the people in the country. There definitely needs to be a solution for these people, but it might not be so simple. I will never go back to NYC now and say how small the apartments are, because well you could be in Hong Kong.
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, May 2, 9:17 PM
(East Asia) Unlike Singapore's regimented government housing, Hong Kong faces a severe housing crisis, forcing hundreds of thousands of people to live in tiny 4 by 6 foot homes. Hong Kong has a population of 7.3 million but only 7% of the city is cleared for housing. Therefore, landlords have to get creative. Stacking these "coffin homes" one on top of another is a great way to save space while providing the bare minimum housing. The coffin homes, little more than closets, have no windows or room to move around. Skyrocketing housing prices have caused extremely dense buildings as the elderly, disabled, young, and poor are forced to move in.
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The rise of the Asian megacity (and why 'metacities' are the next big thing)

The rise of the Asian megacity (and why 'metacities' are the next big thing) | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"Asia's rapid urbanisation is changing the very shape and nature of what we think of as a city.  It's not just the rapid increase in their numbers or their sheer size that makes these megacities fascinating. They look, feel and behave differently, too."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 12, 2016 2:29 PM

The term megacity (a city with a population greater than 10 million) has been around for a while and there wasn't much linguistic need to describe something bigger.  Today, most megacities are more like Lagos and Mumbai, places of extreme wealth asymmetries than the global cities of New York City and London.  Some are now using the term metacity to describe cities with populations of 20 million.  Asian metacities are a good place to start thinking about the largest urban regions that are increasingly dominating economic, political and cultural affairs.      

 

Tags: urbanmegacitiesEast Asia.

Lee Hancock's curator insight, November 1, 2016 8:48 PM

Mega city to Meta city...

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China publishes new map

China publishes new map | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
China has published a new map of the entire country including the islands in the South China Sea (West Philippine Sea) in order to "better show" its territorial claim over the region.

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Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 2, 2015 9:44 PM

Not only does China have a strong economic system and the high population in the world, but they also claim South China Sea. Also since they are wealthy, then they hire maritime security to make sure other areas such as the Philippines and Malaysia don't attempt to take over China's seas. Also, the Philippines attempts to battle China over oil and natural gases but they fail against China because China's more populated than the Philippines. The main point of this map is to show how much of the ocean and sea China claims and they claim about 18% of water out of their land population.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 23, 2015 1:09 PM

This map exemplifies how different countries have differing impressions of land/territory that they own. China views itself as this image depicted above. They honestly believe it. As ridiculous as it sounds I do understand why. China owns this region of the world and will continue to do so. They are claiming land and even forming new land throughout the South China Sea. What is important about the creating of land mass is that China then controls 200 nautical miles around whatever they construct. There is nothing the neighboring countries in the region can do about it. China knows it is a dominant military power and intimidates other countries.

For example, the island of Taiwan is claimed by China as a province. China does not recognize the "Republic of China" (ROC) which governs Taiwan and used to govern mainland China prior to the Chinese Civil War. China has even threatened the island with military use if the people openly declare a massive independent movement. There is a lot more to this history, more than a scoop can provide for, however in a nutshell, Taiwan is China's and will continue to be so. 

In another region of China bordering India and Pakistan, which conveys the expansive territory China covers as a country and its various neighboring countries, China is yet claiming another piece of land. As if the dispute between India and Pakistan was not great enough the two countries also differ over territory just north of the Kashmir border region. China also believes this territory is theirs, now making the land up for grabs between the three nations. China may or may not have historical ties that link it to this piece of land. But in either case it certainly views this territory as an area of land that is open for taking, in that it could eventually claim the territory as a whole. What would Pakistan and India do? These two countries have enough going on. 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:55 AM

At first when looking at this map, it seems just about right knowing that China is a huge territorial country, but we also see that this map, when compared to an older map, is different. In this map, we can see that the islands on the West, China has claimer part of there territory. This is simply an analysis of how China seeks geopolitical power over these islands. The map shows China’s claim over the South China Sea by marking ten dash lines around the region just off the coasts of Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei, and the Philippines’ islands of Palawan and Luzon. These are all individual countries, that have there own culture, language, separate of that of China. The difference between this issue and perhaps that of Catalonia seeking independence over Spain, is that these countries like Malaysia and Brunei are already territorial countries. China is simply showing that they have the power to declare this map, even if its not true. 




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Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade

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Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:40 PM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  


New Jersey at 24

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:22 AM

This more clearly shows the regional restructuring of the global economy than just about anything I've ever seen, especially manufacturing.  The 8 largest and busiest ports in the world are all in East or Southeast Asia (and 11 of the top 13).  A quick glance at the historical charts will show that most of these were relatively minor ports that have exploded in the last 20 years.  

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, East Asia, industry, economic.

Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 2, 3:28 AM
This interactive map of the fifty largest ports in the world is very revealing. It tells us that there has been a shift in the global economy from centered around Atlantic trade to Pacific trade. The eight largest ports are all located in East or Southeast Asia, showing a massive growth in Asia's economies over just a few decades.
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Disputed Isles

Disputed Isles | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

Competing territorial claims have led to maritime disputes off the coast of Asia. See a map of the islands at issue.

 

This is an nice interactive map that allows the reader to explore current geopolitical conflicts that are about controlling islands.  This is an good source to use when introducing Exclusive Economic Zones, which is often the key strategic importance of small, lightly populated islands.   

 

Tags: EastAsia, SouthEastAsia, political, unit 4 political, territoriality, autonomy, conflict, economic. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:40 PM

This interactive page gives relevant information about islands that are disputed over in southeast Asia.  I liked it because you could see the information in context with the map.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:47 PM

This is like a game of Monopoly when people try and get all the houses or businesses. Except this is real life and real isles. Whose is whose? How does Asia decide where and how the EEZ's should be divided.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:05 PM

considering that half of the nations involved are island nations, this is hardly surprising. every nation has issues with their neighbors. even the us and Canada dispute some territory. but these disputes can hardly end as well, when half of these nations have fought wars with each other for most of their histories.

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Getting Japanese Citizenship

Getting Japanese Citizenship | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"To become a Japanese citizen, a foreigner must display 'good conduct', among other things. The rules do not specify what that means, and make no mention of living wafu (Japanese-style). But for one candidate, at least, it involved officials looking in his fridge and inspecting his children’s toys to see if he was Japanese enough (he was). Bureaucratic discretion is the main reason why it is hard to get Japanese nationality. The ministry of justice, which handles the process, says officials may visit applicants’ homes and talk to their neighbors."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 13, 2016 3:04 PM

Japan has a remarkably homogeneous population, in large part because they have very tight immigration laws (here is a more extended list of the requirements to obtain a Japanese citizenship).

 

Questions to Ponder: How is the notion of Japanese citizenship different from American citizenship?  As Japan's population continues to decline, how might that change Japan's migration/citizenship policies?   

 

Tags: JapanEast Asia, place, perspective, cultural norms, culture.

Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 29, 8:51 AM
Interesting to see how the Japanese handle citizenship differently than most of world and America. Japan is mostly a homogeneous culture and from seeing there citizenship laws one can tell why. A foreigner must live there for 10 years  and display "good conduct" which no one really knows what it is and also prove to be Japanese enough in culture. It will be interesting to see how this continues today in a world that keeps becoming more and more global. All over the news we see constant backlash about countries that do not want to accept more immigrants or give certain rights to citizens, however you never really hear of the Japanese. The Japanese have many cultures that they can keep alive with mostly a homogeneous population and most likely helps cause less violence and less arguments among its politics. Imagine if here in America they searched your house to see if you were American enough? I think that might be headline news by the night. 
tyrone perry's curator insight, April 24, 10:35 PM
If you want to move and live in Japan and attain a citizenship be ready to give up your current citizenship and go on one heck of a rollercoaster.  Japan is one of the toughest places to get a citizenship.  For one you have to live there for at least 10 years.  Then the government can and will come to your home to inspect it from the types of pens you have there to the kid of pictures you hang on your wall.  The main thing is the Japanese government wants you to really adapt to their culture.  Very few are naturalized, out of 12446 that applied only 9400 were accepted.  But the good news is, is it is free compared to 550 in the US and 1200 in the U.k.
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The colourful propaganda of Xinjiang

The colourful propaganda of Xinjiang | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

"China is in the midst of a crackdown on what it describes as 'terrorism driven by religious extremism'. The campaign is focused on the western province of Xinjiang, home to China's Uighur ethnic minority who are predominantly Muslim."


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Kendra King's curator insight, April 3, 2015 7:37 PM

This art seems like a logical extension of the government’s use of power although I personally don’t agree with their abuse of power. In China the government will uses its authority to monitor the personal activities of its citizens as demonstrated by the pictures dictating what people should and shouldn’t wear. When the citizens don’t follow through with China’s rule, violence typically happens. In fact, a fair deal of the paintings showed violence (i.e. the tank running people over). I actually find those depictions more offensive and disturbing than any of the other pictures because the end result is clearly that of dath rather than disapproval. Now, I understand that some places need to be ruled with an iron fist (i.e. Iraq), however I don’t really see how threatening people with more violence solves the issue of extremism. If anything, doesn’t this just give the extremist more of a reason to dislike the government? As such, is the government just creating more resentment that will lead to demonstrations in the future? I say this because eventually when a local population is subject to such horrible treatment, there isn't much else to lose and very little reason no to fight back. 

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 16, 2015 9:20 PM

This article has great insight on the way government influences popular belief. We have seen these many times in American society also when government was afraid of communism during the cold war for instance. Often we have prejudgements or beliefs and we are not sure where they even stem from. Pushed Propaganda can be very influential over the mass population, in instilling certain beliefs.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:45 PM
The point the Chinese are trying to make is that the Muslim people are bad, they do unacceptable things and it needs to be taken care of. They are making it hard for a couple to get married and if they do it is with special permission. They even banned anyone under the age of 18 to enter a mosque. Praying in Xinjiang is highly regulated and comes with strict rules and consequences. In all their propaganda you can see how they represent getting rid of the muslims because they are wearing black. If you ask me, it seems like the government is doing this because they are afraid of being taken over and losing the area, just like we used to use propaganda in the wars.
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China's territorial claims

One of the geography videos embedded in this interactive map: http://bit.ly/KDY6C2


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John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:24 PM

China is imposing these territorial claims as it is a benefit for their economy. That being said this can cause geo-political tensions that can have detrimental effects on how one country trades with another. 

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, April 27, 2015 12:09 PM

China is currently creating islands in the south china sea to be able to claim the 200 nautic miles around those islands as their EEZ, a chapter of cheeting in its claims over control of the south china sea.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 6, 2015 3:08 PM

China's rise to prosperity over the last couple of decades is not solely  alarming for far-reaching regions of the world but also its neighbors.  This video highlights that with its coverage of the land-disputes between China and its Eastern and Southeastern Asian neighbors.  It's only common sense to realize that once a nation becomes a world power it will seek to grow even more powerful.  couple that with the fact that a small nation will inevitably feel self-conscious compared to its huge neighbor you get the phenomenon that is covered in this video.

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East Asia's maritime disputes

East Asia's maritime disputes | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it
A race for energy resources makes unresolved territorial disputes more dangerous in both North-East and South-East Asia

Tags: borders, political, conflict, water, China, Japan, East Asia.


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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:48 PM

I couldn't view this content. Its "cookies" were unable to read my computer.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 1:04 PM

Oil resources in the South China Sea are fueling territorial disputes over small islands and territorial waters. China, in order to claim these oil plays for itself, is claiming islands all over the sea. Extending its EEZ will ensure these oil plays. Many of these islands are no more than coral atolls, but China is arguing that they belong to it because of its measures to develop some of these islands. One resort islands and weather stations are being constructed in order to provide some sort of legitimate claim to these places. Also, by claiming these islands and expanding the EEZ, China is trying to claim other countries' EEZs as its own. While China is the powerhouse of the region, many fear that land grabs may turn into military action. 

 

As long as the world is reliant on fossil fuels, territorial disputes will continue and possibly grow in number. Dependency on a non-renewable resource will eventually lead to more regional and global arguments. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, April 12, 2015 3:26 PM

The dispute between The north and South of asia are evident. in a global perspective this territorial battle in somewhat may affect global development as far as trading with the United states. It will affect global interests, and this is why the senator kerry as i recall has made countless trips to help resolve the issues between the two North east and the South to come into an agreement to help because they dont want to loose energy resources and disturb the security that has been provided its a very tough situation.

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Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010

Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010 | Human Geography is Everything! | Scoop.it

Globalization has hit...hard and fast. 


Via Seth Dixon, Jose Soto, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:46 AM

These two images are perhaps a goo example of how globalization has developed over Shanghai in just 20 years. The images show how once greener and more spacious the region looked before in 1990, and the other image shows how technology has developed and become an important priority to the people. There are huge tall buildings located in the area and the other natural source seen is the body of water surrounding some of the tallest buildings in the area. There is no longer any trees which is also a sign of how un-important or how simple to was for the Shanghai to knock them down to simply make more buildings. The concept shows how business has developed in the region but also shows the potentially jobs located here as well. Overall, this part of Shanghai is very economically stable but it is also important to see outside of the heart of the buildings. 

Matt Chapman's curator insight, April 26, 12:21 PM
Shanghai's growth over the last 20 years is remarkable and astounding.  Globalization has come to China and China has grown vastly over the years, this is good and bad.  Pollution and waste is a problem with large cities but it also shows wealth and prosperity.
Christina Caruso's curator insight, April 28, 1:56 PM
Looking at this two pictures the top one is Shanghai in 1990 and the bottom is Shanghai in 2010. There is a big difference between the two pictures.  The top picture shows Shanghai looking like and average city not very pretty.  The bottom picture makes Shanghai look nice and beautiful.  Globalization has hit hard and fast.