Human Geography CP
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Bye-Bye, Baby

Bye-Bye, Baby | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Birthrates are falling around the world. And that’s O.K.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, April 5, 2014 11:23 PM

Baby boom,  baby bust. What the future holds. 

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What to Expect When No One's Expecting: America's Coming Demographic Disaster

What to Expect When No One's Expecting: America's Coming Demographic Disaster

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What to Expect When No One's Expecting: America's Coming Demographic Disaster [Jonathan V. Last] on Amazon.com. *FREE* super saver shipping on qualifying offers. Look around you and think for a minute: Is America too crowded?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 27, 2013 9:36 PM

I have yet to read this book, but the title alone says that it could be an intriguing supplemental text for a unit on population (or an 'opposing viewpoint' to consider).  For those that have read the book, please comment below. 


Tags: USA, declining population, population, demographicsmodels.

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, April 28, 2013 7:36 PM

I really wasn't sure where to put this scoop. There may be a time when the GMOs affect our fertility as many think GMOs are affecting herds fed GMOs. The physical environment might affect this as well. The social and economic challenges may impact fertility and plain selfishness and putting industrial needs over human needs could affect it as well. It looks like an interesting book so I thought I would make note of it.

Tara Cohen's comment, May 1, 2013 2:58 PM
I ordered this book from Amazon because I thought it would be a great fit for AP Human. I read the first 20 pages last night and was blown away. It totally covers all the information in the Demography Unit and the author has a sense of humor. Only 20 pages in, but I give it two thumbs up!
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Population Bracketology

Population Bracketology | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Try the Population Bracketology game from @uscensusbureau! Weekly data visualization from the U.S. Census Bureau compares populations for US states and metro areas.

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, March 29, 2013 9:51 AM

Try bracketology for geography while you're waiting for games to start!  :)

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 10, 2015 9:15 PM

I got 52 on both, some surprises for me.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, October 4, 2015 11:56 AM

I gotcha fantasy league right here.

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As U.S. birth rate drops, concern for the future mounts

As U.S. birth rate drops, concern for the future mounts | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"The nation's fertility rate has slipped below replacement levels partly because of the recession and a decline in immigration. That's raising concern about the nation's future."


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Brett Sinica's comment, April 23, 2013 3:11 PM
These stats are hard to take in, because it seems like even though birth rates are considered to be dropping, the country’s total population continues to rise, and fast. Immigration probably plays a major role in the adding of new citizens, though just because birth rates are decreasing it shouldn’t necessarily mean a bad thing. With a slow increase of people, there could possibly be drops in the unemployment rate, or even poverty level at a big stretch. With fewer people in the country, it could mean less competition among others, leaving more options for people to pursue. It says at the end of the article that, “there are no cases of peace and prosperity in the face of declining populations.” This may hold true to an extent, but look at China for example. Their population is the largest in the world, containing roughly 20 of the 30 most polluted cities and being the top consumer of energy. Though the country has an unemployment level which is half of ours, they must put in place family planning methods such as the “one-child policy” to hope for better population control. If I know the United States, I highly doubt they would ever resort to such measures, unless the government wants uproars. So maybe I’m optimistic about the birth rate drops, but it shouldn’t be too much of a problem. Maybe we should rid of the self-checkouts and automated answering machines and slowdown in technology so we don’t find ourselves in a situation that’d become too hard to handle.
Meg Conheeny's comment, April 26, 2013 2:48 PM
This decline in birth rates is largely due to the recession; people don’t want to have children because they can’t afford the care. We need to have a balance in our population. Having one age group, like elderly people, dominating over other generations can be a problem. Even though the birth rates are decreasing, our population is still growing at a steady rate. Immigrants trying to make a home for themselves and their families in the United States contribute in a big way to our population increase.
I think that when and if the economy bounces back, families will start to feel comfortable with their finances and the birth rate will spike. Yet, if the birth rate does get back to normalcy and the immigrants continue to come to this country maybe our population will see too much of an increase and overpopulation could be a problem. But I doubt our country will ever adopt the “one-child policy” currently in use in China, we will find some other way to control our population, whatever that may be.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:45 PM
The recession is a huge factor as to why the birth/fertility rate is dropping. It costs a lot of money to have a child and most people can’t afford to care for themselves never mind another baby. Even though the birth rate has been decreasing over the years, the population is still increasing due to immigration. With the birth rate decreasing the level of poverty could potentially decrease as well because there will not be an economic burden. I don’t think there should be too much of a concern about the birthrate dropping because once the economy returns to normal I’m sure people will want to expand their family. I do agree to a certain extent with the statement in the article: “Population growth leads to human innovation, and innovation leads to conservation ... There are no cases of peace and prosperity in the face of declining populations.” Overpopulation, like in China, causes many issues, not just economically.
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Religion and Demographics

http://www.ted.com Hans Rosling had a question: Do some religions have a higher birth rate than others -- and how does this affect global population growth? ...

 

What are the connections between religion and demographics?  How does this impact population structure in a particular country?  I found this video from Jeff Martin's fabulous website; Check it out!  http://www.martinsaphug.com/  


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Juliette Norwood's curator insight, January 13, 2014 9:21 AM

This can be viewed in the perspective of a citizen of an LDC. In LDCs, there are religions that cause the woman to be subservient to men. A higher birth rate could be the cause. If these  small religions were to distribute and be adhered to, there could possibly be a spike in the birth rate.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:35 PM

Unit 2

Alex Smiga's curator insight, October 4, 2015 11:50 AM

Hans raps about religion and babies

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If the World Where a Village of 100 People...

What if the world's population were reduced to 100 people community?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners.  For more information see: http://www.miniature-earth.com/


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China's One-Child Policy

China's One-Child Policy | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"In 1979, the National Population and Family Planning Commission in China enacted an ambitious program that called for strict population control. Families in various urban districts are urged to have only one child—preferably a son—in order to solve the problems related to overpopulation. What has happened since then and what are its implications for the future of China?"  This is an excellent infographic for understanding population dynamics in the world's most populous country. 


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:26 PM

This was a cool graphic to explain the basics of the birth policies in China.  As a country, it is respectable for them to try and control their global footprint and growth within the country, yet some of the measures that are taken to achieve or sustain them are slightly questionable.  One of the graphics displayed having one child compared to more than one, which were have the chance of being followed by fines, confiscations of belongings, and even job loss.  In a sense, by having more (a child) they actually get less (money, goods, respect).  The goal of reducing the birth rates had actually worked since it was put in place, though it didn't come without some sort of an expense of the citizens.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:04 PM

Very simple and easy to interpret graph on the One child policy in China. When thinking about the "has it been successful" section I was troubled. Yes the government came close to its goal of 1.2 Billion but do so they prevented 400 million births. So its successful because they almost hit the mark but at what costs? Natal policies can leave countries without enough people to repopulate the workforce, we have to keep this in mind. Controlling population is a dangerous project.. 

Daniel Eggen's curator insight, February 9, 2015 8:13 PM

Great infographic on the One Child Policy. Based on the birth rates in other countries in the East Asia region, how much demographic change may there have been in China without the implementation of this policy? 

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Demographic Atlas

Demographic Atlas | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
This atlas shows how the population is changing - growing in some parts of the country, while shrinking in others. The maps show the entire United States by county, using data from the U.S. Census Bureau's 2010 Census and Esri. How do things look in your neighborhood?

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For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price' | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"China's one-child only policy and historic preference for boys has led to a surplus of marriageable Chinese men. Young women are holding out for better apartments, cars and the like from potential spouses...30 to 48 percent of the real estate appreciation in 35 major Chinese cities is directly linked to a man's need to acquire wealth — in the form of property — to attract a wife."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, podcast, culture, population.


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:16 PM

I feel as though marriage can be complicated in China due to the one child policy. The amount of males outweigh the females. Therefore, there will not be as many marriages because there are not enough females to go around. Grooms have to put out so much for their brides. For example, in this article, her groom is unable to even get in the room to see her unless he puts up a chunk of money first. This is a typical ordeal for Chinese weddings. People describe it as a negotiation process. He must do whatever is told of him before seeking her hand in marriage. The "bride price" is when the groom gives the brides family a fair amount of money. A typical amount for an ordinary family to give is around $10,000. This is so much to get married and on top of all this, gender roles are typically unbalanced. In order to get married in China, you best make sure your a man ready to fulfill every request of your bride.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 2015 5:53 PM

I always heard that men were more desirable in China because they are the ones that carry out the family name and provide for the family. Women, however, are seen as much weaker and are treated as lesser. For the newly wed couple in the article, they hope to have a baby girl because it is much cheaper when she gets married. I never thought of it this way but having a girl would be much cheaper as the parents would not have to pay the "bride price" or for the apartment in which their daughter will be living in. 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:48 AM

Unit 3

Culture

Cultural Practices

Cultural practuces in China are changing, but old customs are staying the dame. An old tradition is still being help up, called the "bride price.;This is a price that men must pay in order to marry. In China the male to female ratio is vey off, with 117 men to every 100 women.

Insight

Women are still being given a price on their head. It's a little different than it is in America.The culture behind the bride price is still going on in China and with China's ways of remembering traditions. China is a very traditional place with cultures following old traditions. The One Child policy, resulting in many males compared to females, and the strong traditions in China all result in why their customs stay for so long. 

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Population 7 Billion

Population 7 Billion | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

"Just 200 years ago, there were only 1 billion people on the planet, and over the next 150 years, that number grew to 3 billion. But in the past 50 years, the global population has more than doubled, and the UN projects that it could possibly grow to 15 billion by the year 2100. As the international organization points out, this increasing rate of change brings with it enormous challenges."

 


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Roman M's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:17 AM

At first, the world's population did not grow a lot. Now we are growing about 1 billion in 12 years, that is scary compared to the 200 years we grew about 1 billion. These are some pictures of some highly dense populations. It is even scarier that in 2100 the population is suspected to be 15 billion.

jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:25 AM

Over the years our world population has grown enormously. Almost  200 years ago there was only 1 billion people in the world, and as time went on the population started to increase dramatically. By 2100, geographers say the population will grow to be 150 million people in the world. The population continues to grow throughout time, we therefore should be cautious on how we are to our environment.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 22, 2015 12:49 PM

I saw the pictures. It is amazing how peoples back yards are all different. From water to dirt to garbage to no back yards at all. I was commenting on the fact with the population growth there is only one way to build and that is up. Then i saw the pictures of the High risers and how tall they were and so close together. It is a no wonder people live in a stressful environment. There is nothing like living in a wide open land lot with grass in Wyoming or Montana but that sure will change in the next 50 years.

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Inside India’s pop-up city

Inside India’s pop-up city | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Every 12 years, the Kumbh Mela, a centuries-old Hindu pilgrimage, temporarily transforms an empty floodplain in India into one of the biggest cities in the world.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:43 PM

Hindu pilgrims from all over India flock to bathe where it the Yamuna Saraswati Rivers join with the Ganges River for a religious experience.  This is a massive undertaking where the cultural practices create migratory patterns that reshape cities because of a sacred physical geography

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 2014 12:21 AM

This article is about the sacred gathering which occurs every 12 years at the merging point of the sacred Hindu rivers. Millions of people bathe in the waters daily during the Kumbh Mela. This sacred physical geography causes a massive human migration and creates a temporary mega-city. The temporary city is an excellent way to experiment with the planning of mega cities which, as evidenced by the problematic physical and human geography of Mexico City, are often not planned so much as just they just expand to meet the needs of the time. Urban planning should be particularly interesting for the people of India as the rapid population growth will cause significant expansion in its cities.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 13, 2014 1:43 PM

Every 12 years Hindus come together for a religious gathering, which results in the creation of a temporary mega city. The millions of people who attend this Hindu pilgrimage create this mega city for 55 days. It is impressive to see a temporary city supply housing, electricity, food and clean drinking water for millions of people. 

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Asians outnumber Hispanics among new immigrants to U.S.

Asians outnumber Hispanics among new immigrants to U.S. | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
As immigration levels from Mexico have plunged, the number of new arrivals from Asia has increased.

 

Don't listen to the election year rhetoric about immigration policies if you want to understand the shifting demographic profile of immigrants entering the United States.  For years now, immigration from Latin America has been at incredibly low levels mainly from 1) limited job market in the U.S. (weakening the pull factor), 2) increased deportation (weakening the pull factor) and 3) a sharp drop in Mexican birth rates (weakening the push factor).  What other push and pull factors are influences this change in the demographic profile of migrants?   Considering that Asian migrants are more highly educated that the rest of the American population (and Hispanics have less education than the general U.S. population), how will this change the labor market within the different sectors of the economy?


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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 9, 2012 11:46 AM
If you just listen to politicians you'd never get your facts straight. This here is a prime example of that. It can't hurt to have better educated immigrants, according to the statistics, but it may not be long before our citizens are crying out that the higher paying jobs are no longer in abundance. This could easily effect the demand for schooled and skilled job seekers, in an already damaged job market.
Brandon Murphy's comment, July 12, 2012 6:14 AM
It's not even just politicians that give you false data, media outlets such as FOX news would never reveal information like this. I agree Roland, there is absolutely nothing wrong with having a better educated immigrant population.
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The Miniature Earth Project

The Miniature Earth Project | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it
Miniature Earth. What if the population of the world were reduced into a community of only 100 people?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this infographic and website attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners. 


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Emma Lupo's curator insight, October 21, 2014 1:10 AM

Intro to liveability

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Countries with the Most Migrants

Countries with the Most Migrants | Human Geography CP | Scoop.it

List of the countries with the most migrants in the world as measured by net migration rate.


Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list?  


Tags: Migration, population, Immigration, statistics, worldwide, unit 2 population. 


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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:04 PM

This is an interesting little chart because it reveals to us which countries have the highest percentage of migrants that make up their general population. Definitely suprised me to see Qatar as the number one on the list, I would have expected the US to be at the top, but it is not even in the top 10!

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:26 PM

This shows the net migration of immigrants. 

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, September 30, 2014 4:04 PM

Remember this is based on a % of the total population, and not total #. Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list?