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The ghastly tragedy of the suburbs

The ghastly tragedy of the suburbs | Human Geography | Scoop.it
In James Howard Kunstler's view, public spaces should be inspired centers of civic life and the physical manifestation of the common good. Instead, he argues, what we have in America is a nation of places not worth caring about.

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Kevin Barker's curator insight, January 21, 2015 9:02 AM

This could become something of a fixation for me.  Plano TX is seen on many levels of a great suburban city but here is one way it is lacking most.

Linda Denty's curator insight, February 3, 2015 5:41 PM
Strong language used in this!
Zeke Robinson's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:23 PM

i disagree with this guy, for suburbs bring us close and save space and its good that we have them.

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City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs

City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs | Human Geography | Scoop.it

A new report tracks demographic trends across 66 U.S. metro areas.  The report provides comprehensive evidence for Aaron Renn's "new donut" model of cities (pictured in above image, on the right). Renn's model proposes that city centers and outer-ring suburbs are doing well economically, but inner-ring suburbs are struggling with a new influx of poverty."

 

Tags: urban, economic, urban models, APHG.


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polis: Mapping the Suburbanization of Poverty

polis: Mapping the Suburbanization of Poverty | Human Geography | Scoop.it

One of the fundamental issues in American urbanism is the changing geography of poverty. American cities are famous around the world for having abandoned large portions of the central core, largely unthinkable in Europe and much of the world. Even if suburban historians are doing their best to remind us that poverty — along with economic, social and ethnic diversity — has always existed in suburbs, shifts in recent decades are fundamentally changing metropolitan life in many parts of the country.


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The Suburbanization of Poverty: An Infographic secret republic

The Suburbanization of Poverty: An Infographic secret republic | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Suburbanization of Poverty: An Infographic (RT @ProPublica: The suburbanization of poverty: an infographic http://t.co/PJqIFBcc h/t @sunfoundation...)...

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Bella Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:52 PM

Urban unit

Summary

Suburbanization of Poverty

This is a picture demonstrating the difference in the percent changes in poverty. It contrasts the percent change in poverty with the Urban center, the center go the circle, with the suburban ring, the outside rings of each circle. Big cities in the U.S. are plotted on this photo o this map. The numbers and shading show the difference in poverty and the contrast from the center city to the outside ring. 

Insight

The photo of this map reveals that the difference in percent changes in poverty are greater in suburban areas more than in cities and urban areas. This shows a new geographical trend in the location of poverty in populated cities in the US such as Dallas, Houston, Phoenix, and San Diego.This shows the uneven placement of people in poverty between major cities and between their urban and suburban areas. 

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The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl Series] | the Original Green | Steve Mouzon

The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl Series] | the Original Green | Steve Mouzon | Human Geography | Scoop.it
high-speed thoroughfares burden land development with nearly double the acreage of worthless land, and lost value on almost half the frontages

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City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs

City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs | Human Geography | Scoop.it

A new report tracks demographic trends across 66 U.S. metro areas.  The report provides comprehensive evidence for Aaron Renn's "new donut" model of cities (pictured in above image, on the right). Renn's model proposes that city centers and outer-ring suburbs are doing well economically, but inner-ring suburbs are struggling with a new influx of poverty."

 

Tags: urban, economic, urban models, APHG.


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Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:09 PM

This shows the changes in urban geography and how the world is changing due to all the new technology available now.

Bella Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:33 PM

Urban unit

Summary

This article goes in to depth on a newer model on cites called the donut model, as pictured similar to a donut. The donut model was created by Aaron Renn, and it shows urban development recently in cities. The center of the city is grownign economically and falling. There is an influx of people moving in , resulting in an increase of poverty too. Also more educated people are moving in like young newly educated individuals.

insight

The new structure of cities forming is a change from the old. With cities now developing bigger and more industrial, there are many opportunities for people for work in the center of the cit. however, many people may want the jobs but can't get them, so many of those in poverty live in the city centers in search of economic opportunities. It is also interesting to see the status of the people changing the in the city center with that also more young educated people move to city centers, most likely in search of job opportunities. This new way of urban development is modernizing the work system.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 8:44 AM

More and more the urban stage is filling and cities are becoming once again the next big thing. After WW2 suburbs became intensively popular but now since a change in personnel views people prefer the city more.

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Alarm Bells Toll For Human Civilization As World's 12th Largest Mega-City To Run Out Of Water In Just 60 Days

Alarm Bells Toll For Human Civilization As World's 12th Largest Mega-City To Run Out Of Water In Just 60 Days | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The city of Sao Paulo is home to 20 million Brazilians, making it the 12th largest mega-city on a planet dominated by shortsighted humans. Shockingly, it ha

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Dramatic Confluences

Dramatic Confluences | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Confluences occur wherever two streams come together. If the gradient is low (i.e., nearly level) and the properties of the two streams are very different, the confluences may be characterized by a dramatic visible distinction as the mixing occurs only slowly."

 

Tags:  physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.


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Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, January 7, 2015 5:47 AM

Wonderful pictures of rivers confluences

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Here's How Little Time We Have Until Global Warming Is Out Of Control

Here's How Little Time We Have Until Global Warming Is Out Of Control | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The news is in: humans are totally failing in...

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16 Children & Their Bedrooms From Around the World…

16 Children & Their Bedrooms From Around the World… | Human Geography | Scoop.it
What did your childhood bedroom look like? Chances are if you grew up in a westernized world, it had a solid bed, scattered toys, and wall decorations that creatively expressed the type of child you were, and hinted at the person you were to become. What you may have taken for granted, however, a large percent of others will never experience. There’s no right or wrong pertaining to living situations, but many unique lessons to be gained from acknowledging that the type of childhood one is given has an impressionable effect on their future.

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dilaycock's curator insight, September 15, 2014 8:20 PM

What a great way to connect with students and discuss issues such as lifestyle, living standards, health etc.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 18, 2014 5:34 AM

Personal geographies - perspectives and worldviews

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Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


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Kristen Trammell's curator insight, March 23, 2015 12:05 PM

I. Using the data from CIA Facebook, global post created a map illustrating the median ages of countries around the world. The world’s fifteen youngest countries are all located in Africa. The high number of teenagers in developed countries leads to youth unemployment which leads to the countries being “hampered by weak economies.” 

 

II. The distribution of ages effects countries by “weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.” Although countries with a fixed population of a young age can be detrimental, a country with an aging population can lead to a declining birth rate. This leads to labor shortages in the future which additionally stifles the economy.  

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:08 PM

Demographics seemingly started with age as a metric many years ago and have evolved into marketing tools, political footballs, and ways to combat everything from obesity to social security. Africa is clearly the youngest and probably for a very morbid reason; AIDS and Ebola among other diseases have taken their toll on the sexually active and thus have reduced the average age of their population.

Germany seems to be the place to go for a job as the labor shortage will mean higher wages for the folks who are left. Japan has another issue; a healthy aging population that will strain the government's ability to financially take care of them.

I wonder if the unevenness of Europe is an indication of the two World wars that were fought mostly on the turf. Did some countries lose more than others? If more soldiers, presumably of baby making age, perished did this affect the countries ability to keep pace with the Germany's and Spain's of Europe?

Diet seems to play a large part as well as the Mediterranean is well represented in terms of age. Does their healthy diet of fish, nuts, legumes and olive oil make a difference?

I could spend all day postulating, but I'll leave some of the findings for you to discover...

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 2016 8:05 PM

The median age of a population call be a quite telling statistic--almost a surrogate for a population pyramid.  I post this with a special attention to Sub-Saharan Africa; the youngest 15 countries in the world are all in Africa, one of the major demographic realities confronting African economies and politics.  Here is a map with the median age of U.S. counties.


Tag: population, demographic transition model, population pyramids.

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Slate - How the Suburbs Got Poor

Slate - How the Suburbs Got Poor | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Before we can understand what makes some suburbs so miserable, we first have to understand what makes others succeed. The most successful suburban neighborhoods fall into two categories. First, there are the dense and walkable ones that, like the most successful urban neighborhoods, have town centers that give local residents easy access to retail and employment opportunities. These neighborhoods generally include a mix of single-family homes and apartment buildings, which allows for different kinds of families and adults at different stages of life to share in the same local amenities. The problem with these urban suburbs, as Christopher Leinberger recounts in his 2009 book The Option of Urbanism, is that there are so few of them, and this scarcity fuels the same kind of gentrification that is driving poor people out of successful cities.

 

The other model for success can be found in sprawling suburban neighborhoods dominated by households with either the time or the resources to maintain single-family homes and to engage in civic life. As a general rule, the neighborhoods in this latter category don’t allow for apartment buildings or townhomes on small lots. They implement stringent local land-use regulations that keep them exclusive, and they attract families that tenaciously defend the character of their neighborhoods.


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Mamie Davis's comment, September 13, 2014 3:18 AM
I really do think you desire as an adult what you grew up with as a child, especially if happy memories are associated with it. I grew up in a large house with a one acre yard of green grass, flowers, garden, garage, shed. We could see our neighbor's houses but they were far away enough that we didn't feel claustraphobic is we out in our yards at the same time. My parents also put up little shrubs around our yard to add to the feeling of privacy. However my friend from Spain, who I imagined lived in a house with a yard too for an entire year prior to visiting his family, lives in a flat in an apartment building. It is completely normal to him to live in a place like that your whole life. When I asked him where he went to be outside, relax and enjoy the sunshine he said they went to the street or the neighborhood center. He said only rich people lived in houses and had yards in places where you have little contact with neighbors. What I am saying is that we desire what we had as children, that the economics of our parents time and allowed them to get the place they have made an impression on us and our expectation about our future.
Rob Duke's comment, September 13, 2014 4:02 PM
Yes, I'd agree as humans, we have a sense of place and we like what feels familiar. I've also found that public places are better when truly public. Alleys and underpasses; or those little pocket parks are not nearly as safe as laces that feel like they have "eye" (windows and door where people might be looking). As a chief, I attended planning sessions and insisted on a Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) planning approach. Thus, pockete parks became little "P" shaped culdesacs where the homes all faced the grass patch in the middle (narrow streets with parking only allowed on one side kept speeds low. Sinking the park area can also keep balls from bouncing into the street and serves as a temporary storm drainage retention pond). I'm still not convinced that even a well-designed neighborhood won't eventually become tarnished. In some ways, there's a life cycle where things become run-down for a time and then get rediscovered by a new generation of young families. Having said that I think watching the store to ensure there's a good jobs/housing mix and good design will help neighborhoods maintain their appeal.
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Slate - How the Suburbs Got Poor

Slate - How the Suburbs Got Poor | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Before we can understand what makes some suburbs so miserable, we first have to understand what makes others succeed. The most successful suburban neighborhoods fall into two categories. First, there are the dense and walkable ones that, like the most successful urban neighborhoods, have town centers that give local residents easy access to retail and employment opportunities. These neighborhoods generally include a mix of single-family homes and apartment buildings, which allows for different kinds of families and adults at different stages of life to share in the same local amenities. The problem with these urban suburbs, as Christopher Leinberger recounts in his 2009 book The Option of Urbanism, is that there are so few of them, and this scarcity fuels the same kind of gentrification that is driving poor people out of successful cities.

 

The other model for success can be found in sprawling suburban neighborhoods dominated by households with either the time or the resources to maintain single-family homes and to engage in civic life. As a general rule, the neighborhoods in this latter category don’t allow for apartment buildings or townhomes on small lots. They implement stringent local land-use regulations that keep them exclusive, and they attract families that tenaciously defend the character of their neighborhoods.


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Mamie Davis's comment, September 13, 2014 3:18 AM
I really do think you desire as an adult what you grew up with as a child, especially if happy memories are associated with it. I grew up in a large house with a one acre yard of green grass, flowers, garden, garage, shed. We could see our neighbor's houses but they were far away enough that we didn't feel claustraphobic is we out in our yards at the same time. My parents also put up little shrubs around our yard to add to the feeling of privacy. However my friend from Spain, who I imagined lived in a house with a yard too for an entire year prior to visiting his family, lives in a flat in an apartment building. It is completely normal to him to live in a place like that your whole life. When I asked him where he went to be outside, relax and enjoy the sunshine he said they went to the street or the neighborhood center. He said only rich people lived in houses and had yards in places where you have little contact with neighbors. What I am saying is that we desire what we had as children, that the economics of our parents time and allowed them to get the place they have made an impression on us and our expectation about our future.
Rob Duke's comment, September 13, 2014 4:02 PM
Yes, I'd agree as humans, we have a sense of place and we like what feels familiar. I've also found that public places are better when truly public. Alleys and underpasses; or those little pocket parks are not nearly as safe as laces that feel like they have "eye" (windows and door where people might be looking). As a chief, I attended planning sessions and insisted on a Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) planning approach. Thus, pockete parks became little "P" shaped culdesacs where the homes all faced the grass patch in the middle (narrow streets with parking only allowed on one side kept speeds low. Sinking the park area can also keep balls from bouncing into the street and serves as a temporary storm drainage retention pond). I'm still not convinced that even a well-designed neighborhood won't eventually become tarnished. In some ways, there's a life cycle where things become run-down for a time and then get rediscovered by a new generation of young families. Having said that I think watching the store to ensure there's a good jobs/housing mix and good design will help neighborhoods maintain their appeal.
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Poverty is moving to the suburbs – the question is what to do about it

Poverty is moving to the suburbs – the question is what to do about it | Human Geography | Scoop.it

The conventional image of suburbia is one of bland affluence and social homogeneity. Suburbs are where the middle classes aspire to make their nests. 


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ESRC's curator insight, January 22, 2015 8:38 AM

Article cites research at the ESRC AQMeN Centre

Author Gwilym Pryce receives funding from ESRC.

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The suburb of the future is here

The suburb of the future is here | Human Geography | Scoop.it
How one city avoided the worst of suburbanization and revealed the path toward sustainable urban development

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The amazingly rapid suburbanization of poverty

The amazingly rapid suburbanization of poverty | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Poverty is getting more concentrated, particularly in the suburbs.

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Teaching the Geography of Food

Teaching the Geography of Food | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Food. It’s something we all think about, talk about, and need. Food has been one major topic of interest at National Geographic because it connects all of us to our environment. The recent global population projections for the year 2100 just went up from 9 billion to 11 billion, making the issues of food production and distribution all the more important.  For the last 3 years I’ve stored podcasts, articles, videos, and other resources on my personal site on a wide range of geographic issues, including food resources.  I thought that sharing 10 of my personal favorite resources on the geography of food would be helpful to understand our changing global food systems."


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Claire Law's curator insight, April 26, 2015 2:01 AM

Ten engaging resources on the geography of food

Kaiden-Leigh Cloete's curator insight, April 29, 2015 11:15 PM

This topic connects to our agricultural unit. This article describes the explaining of food. Knowing where our food comes from is a big component in lit today, with all the GMO's going around we don't know what we r busy consuming daily. Having more information in our minds about food would help decrease the long term affects of genetically modified organisms, help maintain a healthy economy, provide more resources such as water, because if GMO's do come to an end then the water will not be as polluted as it is now due to the runoff from the remaining chemicals in GMO's, and also provide a healthy environment for everyone. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 2:10 AM

I absolutely love this article. It touches on many of the most important and challenging issues facing food production in the world, ranging from food manufacturing ethics to global hunger. I think it's interesting how, although we all eat food everyday, we don't think about the many implications associated with the production and consumption of food. To more privileged people, food is not a big deal, as anyone can get food at any time of day. However, for people who are trying to solve the problems associated with food in the modern world or for people who are suffering from hunger and malnutrition, the information presented in this article is extremely important. Brilliant minds can come together to propose potential solutions for all the problems facing food distribution. I can't wait for the day every child can go to bed with a full stomach, and I am willing to do my part to help make that happen.

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Teaching the Geography of Food

Teaching the Geography of Food | Human Geography | Scoop.it
By Seth Dixon, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geography, Rhode Island College  Food. It's something we all think about, talk about, and need. Food has been one major topic of interest at National Ge...

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WWII ‘Mapping Maidens’ Chart Course for Today’s Mapmakers

WWII ‘Mapping Maidens’ Chart Course for Today’s Mapmakers | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"As the demand for its products escalated early in World War II, the Army Map Service, a heritage organization of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, was losing much of its largely male workforce to the armed forces. A solution to the urgent need for replacements emerged when the University of Chicago’s Geography Department developed a course in military map making and began offering it to women’s colleges in the East and Midwest."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 7, 2015 11:19 AM

Women in science are awesome and we need to encourage girls in STEM disciplines, especially geospatial technologies...hearing this story of women in the past might help to inspire a future generation. 


Tags: mapping, cartographywar, gender, STEM, geospatial.

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, March 24, 2015 2:19 AM

I believe this article is very empowering for women around the world. It showed how in this time of trouble in America we took into account the women's workforce and started using it. This article shows how much women helped by making the maps for the male army that was off at war. This story should empower women int their fight for equality and inspire them.

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Without mental maps, we’re lost

Without mental maps, we’re lost | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Elwood was a senior geographer working on the ground-floor of the very global positioning systems (GPS) and geographic information systems (GIS) he will throw up for discussion in his TEDx talk.

His question: Are we surrendering our innate mental map making abilities to technology and relying on and trusting it too much? And for TEDx audiences only, he’ll toss out ideas on ways to prevent that from happening.

 

Tags: mapping, GPS, cartography, TED, 201.


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Jeff Cherry's curator insight, January 12, 2015 9:08 AM

The mind is a terrible thing to waste.

Wyatt Fratnz's curator insight, March 18, 2015 8:08 PM

This text tells about a geographer who exaggerates today's modern dependency of Global Positioning Systems and Mapping, and the importance of still developing a mental map. It is important because lack of reliance of our mental maps leads to a primal fear and increasing instances of the feeling of being lost. The challenge is presented of how we stimulate technology in our mental maps. 

 

This article describes technological and mental process of mapping and how we should use it in our everyday lives. This is important because it gives humans a sense of direction and tells us how to keep it.

Carlee Allen's curator insight, March 26, 2015 6:20 PM

This is an article that explains and adds on to the fact that we Americans have begun too reliant on technology. Keith explains how kids now a days don't have a geographical sense and how it is really going to hurt them in the future.

 

I thought that this article was interesting, because it is a pretty controversial topic and very relatable.

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How languages evolve - Alex Gendler

How languages evolve - Alex Gendler | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 30, 2014 2:58 PM

unit 3

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 18, 2014 11:29 AM

unit 3

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 4:15 PM

Showing the evolution of world languages. Tthousands of languages have developed over time and in this video he talk about the birthplace of diffent languagafes based on their different region, and culture patterns. 

thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number.

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The oceans are full of our plastic – here's what we can do about it

The oceans are full of our plastic – here's what we can do about it | Human Geography | Scoop.it
By 2050, 95% of seabirds will have plastic in their gut. That is just one finding from our national marine debris research project, the largest sample of marine debris data ever collected anywhere in the…

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How the super rich got richer: 10 shocking facts about inequality

How the super rich got richer: 10 shocking facts about inequality | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Danny Dorling: The gap between the super rich and the rest of us is spiralling out of control, with Britain’s 1% grabbing more than their counterparts anywhere else in Europe

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The death of America's suburban dream

The death of America's suburban dream | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The events in Ferguson, Missouri reveal the ‘resegregation’ of America’s once-aspirational inner suburbs, which – far from the social utopias they were meant to be – have become ethnic enclaves: white in one pocket, black in another

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Could you give up meat for just one day a week?

Could you give up meat for just one day a week? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
If you found out there was a simple way to cut your annual carbon emissions by as much as not driving your car for a whole month, would you do it?

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