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Race relations in California better than elsewhere in US, voters say - Los Angeles Times

Race relations in California better than elsewhere in US, voters say - Los Angeles Times | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A half-century after the Watts riots laid bare deep racial divisions in Los Angeles, nearly two-thirds of California voters say race relations in the state are better than elsewhere in America even as they acknowledge persistent tensions, according...
Riley Tuggle's insight:


I think California having less and less racism is great. Since here is so much people there, everyone seems to accept any type of race and they are more likely to treat them equally and fairly than a tiny little area that the majority of the population is one race  or ethnicity. We need more people in our world to accept everyone  the way they are, and we definitely need less people that hate on others because of their ethnicity, race, gender, ect. I hope many more states in the USA follow in California's footsteps, and America can continue to accept every citizen and their ethnicity. -RT

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Riley Tuggle's curator insight, April 14, 2015 5:28 PM

I think California having less and less racism is great. Since here is so much people there, everyone seems to accept any type of race and they are more likely to treat them equally and fairly than a tiny little area that the majority of the population is one race  or ethnicity. We need more people in our world to accept everyone  the way they are, and we definitely need less people that hate on others because of their ethnicity, race, gender, ect. I hope many more states in the USA follow in California's footsteps, and America can continue to accept every citizen and their ethnicity. -RT

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Schools' Discipline for Girls Differs by Race and Hue - New York Times

Schools' Discipline for Girls Differs by Race and Hue - New York Times | Human Geography | Scoop.it
For graffiti on a Georgia school’s walls, two girls were suspended. But only one of them ended up in the criminal justice system.
Riley Tuggle's insight:

I think this incident, and many others, show that not only our country, but our world, is still partly segregated and race does determine some decisions we make. Even we aren't racist, I believe we still judge people by their race. For example, how Americans (including myself) just assume Asians, Chinese, ect. are extremely intelligent, and how they sometimes assume that Americans are extremely UNintelligent.-rt

 

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Learning new languages will literally make you see the world differently

Learning new languages will literally make you see the world differently | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Researchers have found that people who speak more than one language literally see the world differently, ScienceMag reveals. Researchers have found that depending on the primary language spoken, people looking at the same set of events perceive things differently. For example, Russian speakers apparently can distinguish shades of blue faster than English speakers, while Japanese speakers group objects by material rather than shape.

DON’T MISS: Watch: Mesmerizing video gives an incredible look at Friday morning’s solar eclipse

But a new study from the Lancaster University in the United Kingdom focused on bilinguals and looked at how these people see the world and it found some surprising results.

“[We’re] taking that classic debate and turning it on its head,” psycholinguist Panos Athanasopoulos said, by asking whether “two different minds [can] exist within one person” rather than asking whether speakers of different languages have different minds.

In the study, scientists looked at English and German speakers and how they treat events. The English language focuses on situating actions in time, whereas German speakers tend to specify the beginning, middle and end of an event. When looking at the same scene, a German speaker would say that “A man leaves the house and walks to the store,” while an English speaker would say “A man is walking.”

Researchers told 15 native speakers of each language to look at clips showing various ambiguous actions (people walking, biking, running or driving) and asked them to describe them as goal-oriented or not goal-oriented. German speakers matched ambiguous scenes with goal-oriented ones 40% of the time, while English speakers did so 25% of the time. The conclusion was that German speakers are more likely to focus on possible outcomes of actions and English speakers pay more attention to the action happening in front of them.

Scientists then looked at 30 bilinguals who were shown at the same kind of videos, and actively challenged them to switch languages. When English was blocked, subjects saw ambiguous videos as more goal-oriented, just as German speakers from the former test. When German was blocked, subjects acted as English speakers.

The study suggests that languages have an important unconscious role in a person’s perception of events.

“By having another language, you have an alternative vision of the world,” Athanasopoulos said. “You can listen to music from only one speaker, or you can listen in stereo … It’s the same with language.”

“This is an important advance,” Atlanta Emory University cognitive scientist Phillip Wolff said about the study. “If you’re a bilingual speaker, you’re able to entertain different perspectives and go back and forth. That really hasn’t been shown before.”

More details about the study are available in this month’s edition of Psychological Science.

Via Charles Tiayon
Riley Tuggle's insight:

This study is very interesting to me. I think it is crazy how language can change the way you perceive the events happening all around you. This research shows how much language impacts our lives and may even help us make better, or worse, decisions. I would love to test this, how the scientists tested it, myself. I think it would be fun observing the results that may surprise me.  -RT

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Rachael Johns's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:05 AM

I think that this is an interesting theory because it not only encourages people to learn new languages but also helps people in everyday life. Even if this theory was not published I think learning new languages would help people see different, not colors but people. Learning a different language could help you see people in a new way.          ~R.J.~

Cassie Brannan's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:16 AM

In this article, ScienceMag reveals that researchers have found that people that speak more than one language, sees the world in a different perspective. Depending on primary languages spoken, people looking at the same set of events think of them differently. For instance, some people may do one thing better than other people. -CB

 

jada_chace's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:31 PM

Speaking two languages can change the way you perceive the events occurring around you. The test in the research shows how language affects our lives dramatically. Scientist Phillip Wolff stated, “If you’re a bilingual speaker, you’re able to entertain different perspectives and go back and forth. That really hasn’t been shown before.” I believe this is true, coming from a student who can speak French. By speaking in a different language allows your brain to be more active and think more efficiently. -JConner

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Hot in the City: Reducing Heat from Urban Waste

Hot in the City: Reducing Heat from Urban Waste | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Cities are hotbeds of sustainability, right? From urban agriculture to social enterprise, you’ll find lots of innovative approaches in urban centers, particularly those on the US coasts. Put a lot of people together in one place, and you generate a lot of ideas.


You also generate a lot of heat, it turns out: a new study in Nature Climate Change argues that urban centers (particularly on coasts) generate a lot of waste heat… and that heat is contributing to the weird weather patterns we’ve been seeing lately. This isn’t climate change (in the way we’ve conventionally considered it), nor is it the “urban heat island” effect. Rather, according to the research team that authored the study...


Via Lauren Moss
Riley Tuggle's insight:

I think this new research proves how much little things we do in the city, such as driving back and forth to a shopping mall everyday, effects the environment and impacts the weather. I live in Florida and I really don't want an even hotter summer when I go into the city, so I hope people (including myself) think about the environment and make better decisions when we are heading to town, like maybe riding a local bus from place to place or car pulling with friends. -RT

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Gerry B's curator insight, February 11, 2013 12:58 AM

About time something should be done on exhausts coming from cities. 

Cassie Brannan's curator insight, March 10, 2015 9:58 PM

This article really makes you think about how we take advantage of the opportunities for resource sharing offered in urban settings. I think people don't have to make a place hotter by generating heat. For instance instead of driving your car to work, you could ride a bike or a bus. -CB 

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Free Technology for Teachers: 5 Services for Creating & Sharing Audio Recordings Online

Free Technology for Teachers: 5 Services for Creating & Sharing Audio Recordings Online | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Mark Smithers, LETP
Riley Tuggle's insight:

I believe these five online services are extremely helpful for teachers that teach in huge schools that have hundreds of students per day. They can easily record an audio or video of something all the students have to do on a daily blog. I know they could just post something they wrote to tell the students what to do, but some kids learn visually rather than just reading. -RT

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LETP's curator insight, July 21, 2013 11:12 PM

This would be great for Pri EL teachers! :)

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Apple Passes Coca-Cola as Most Valuable Brand

Apple Passes Coca-Cola as Most Valuable Brand | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Apple, named most valuable brand by Interbrand, a corporate identity and brand consulting company, is one of five technology companies among the top 10..."

©


Via Leona Ungerer
Riley Tuggle's insight:

I can definitely believe that Apple passed Coca-Cola as the most valuable brand in 2013 because the company has been raising in fame ever since the original iPods hit the market. Then, iPhones became extremely popular and by this year, 2015, almost everyone has one: from high school students to businessmen. -RT 

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seanhoneycombe's curator insight, October 1, 2014 8:44 PM

Apple have been destined to be the worlds most valuable brand for quite some years now, jumping from 8th in 2011 to 2nd in 2012, it was always going to happen. A well deserved place in my opinion as they have had such dominance in the market over the years and is "very much the poster child of the marketing community” now days. 

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How Agriculture Made Our Mouths Too Small for our Teeth

How Agriculture Made Our Mouths Too Small for our Teeth | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The rise of agriculture allowed for the development of complex societies and technologies that likely wouldn't have been possible otherwise. It also wreaked havoc on human health.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
Riley Tuggle's insight:

I agree with this because the people who had to hunt for food have tougher meat to chew, so their jaws would be stronger and large. On the other hand, people who lived/live off crops like corn and wheat, will most likely have smaller jaws that wouldn't be as strong as the people that hunt for meat jaws.-rt

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bobby isham's curator insight, November 5, 2014 7:27 PM

I agree with this article. Eating meat that is not processed is much tougher than meat that has been processed. This is probably one of the reasons that people are having dental problems and have to wear braces. It is a big problem to have a lot of teeth but not a mouth large enough to hold all of those teeth.

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Restless America: State-to-State Migration

Restless America: State-to-State Migration | Human Geography | Scoop.it
From Vizynary:
Approximately 7.1 million Americans moved to another state in 2012. That’s over 2.2% of the U.S. population.
Riley Tuggle's insight:

I noticed how many people migrated to my home state, Florida, and I believe a popular reason why they migrated is possibly because of the beaches, rivers, sunny climate, and maybe even all the urban cities we have such as Miami, Tampa, Jacksonville, Key West, Panama City, Daytona, ect. Also, I want to point out this is a chart with  internal migration only because its migration within the same country, the US. -rt

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Race relations in California better than elsewhere in US, voters say - Los Angeles Times

Race relations in California better than elsewhere in US, voters say - Los Angeles Times | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A half-century after the Watts riots laid bare deep racial divisions in Los Angeles, nearly two-thirds of California voters say race relations in the state are better than elsewhere in America even as they acknowledge persistent tensions, according...
Riley Tuggle's insight:

I think California having less and less racism is great. Since here is so much people there, everyone seems to accept any type of race and they are more likely to treat them equally and fairly than a tiny little area that the majority of the population is one race  or ethnicity. We need more people in our world to accept everyone  the way they are, and we definitely need less people that hate on others because of their ethnicity, race, gender, ect. I hope many more states in the USA follow in California's footsteps, and America can continue to accept every citizen and their ethnicity. -RT

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Riley Tuggle's curator insight, April 20, 2015 3:13 PM


I think California having less and less racism is great. Since here is so much people there, everyone seems to accept any type of race and they are more likely to treat them equally and fairly than a tiny little area that the majority of the population is one race  or ethnicity. We need more people in our world to accept everyone  the way they are, and we definitely need less people that hate on others because of their ethnicity, race, gender, ect. I hope many more states in the USA follow in California's footsteps, and America can continue to accept every citizen and their ethnicity. -RT

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For some Americans, Arabic is a language of terror

For some Americans, Arabic is a language of terror | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Reading the pledge of allegiance in Arabic at a US high school sparked a furious backlash in upstate New York.



New York — It was intended to celebrate language and diversity. But reading the pledge of allegiance in Arabic at a US high school sparked a furious backlash in upstate New York.

Wednesday’s incident at Pine Bush High School, 128km northwest of New York City, angered students, parents, residents and even those who lost loved ones in Afghanistan.

The initial plan to celebrate National Foreign Language week was that students would read the daily American pledge of allegiance in a different language each day.

But when an Arabic-speaking pupil did so, she was harassed and called a terrorist, said senior class president Andrew Zink, 18, who approved the reading.

Zink, who stood by his decision, said he had received threats on Twitter. Veterans who live in the area told US media they opposed the pledge being read in any language other than English.

Local newspaper the Times Herald-Record said school superintendent Joan Carbone received complaints from residents who had lost relatives in Afghanistan — a non-Arab country whose main languages are Pashto and Dari — and from Jewish parents.

Pine Bush Central School District apologised and said that from now on, the pledge of allegiance will be recited only in English.

A statement on its website said the intention had been to celebrate Foreign Language Week and “the many races, cultures and religions that make up this great country and our school district”.

“We sincerely apologise to any students, staff or community members who found this activity disrespectful,” it said.

But the apology has angered Zink and others who say language has nothing to do with what it means to be American.

“Many people were angered about reading, but an equal amount are angered by the apology, so now everyone’s mad,” Zink said.

“America or even American isn’t defined in what language you speak in, but the ideas you believe in.”

Zink, who described Pine Bush as predominantly white, said the incident showed the small town is “not willing to accept other groups of people”.

Sadyia Khalique, a spokeswoman for the New York chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (Cair), criticised the backlash.

“To see the language of Arabic ostracized and being used as a way to target communities or even lead to hate speech is something which is not a goal... of National Language Week,” she said.

Cair noted this was not the first time that Arabic had caused “prejudiced sentiment” in an American high school.

Hate calls and threats from parents namely followed a recitation of the pledge of allegiance in Arabic in 2013 in Colorado.

The same year, parents at a high school in Alabama opposed the introduction of Arabic lessons, claiming they would cause students to “learn a ‘culture of hate’,” Cair said.

For more news from Khaleej Times, follow us on Facebook at facebook.com/khaleejtimes, and on Twitter at @khaleejtimes

Via Charles Tiayon
Riley Tuggle's insight:

I believe this event shows how stereotypical our world is. Arabic isn't a language of violence, its a language just like English. Yes, some terrorists may be Arabic, but terrorists are also English, Spanish, French, ect. Those terrorists should not allow us to see their language as disgraceful just because they spoke that language. The speakers of Arabic are probably disappointed and maybe even confused on why people of other languages see them as violent, and that isn't good at all. -RT

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Nolan Walters's curator insight, March 23, 2015 9:50 AM

The reason that it was spoken in arabic was because the school was having a different language week, and the student in the announcements read the pledge in arabic. It got a very bad reaction because the stereotypes of arabic people being terrorists. I did not se a problem in the student who said the pledge in a different language.

AmandaWilhiteee's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:19 AM

In my opinion on this article is that people were overreacting about the situation. If the school was celebrating Language week, then they should not be punished for it. Yes, this country has had terrorist attacks, but we should still be able to speak diverse languages. And, the Arabian girl did not deserve to be bullied for speaking Arab. 

AW

John Luo's curator insight, October 10, 2015 2:59 AM

concepts of prejudice --> prejudiced conclusions

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The Amish Don’t Get Autism? And They Don’t Get Vaccinations – Possible Link?

The Amish Don’t Get Autism? And They Don’t Get Vaccinations – Possible Link? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
By: WV Outpost People outside the alternative health community are often confused by the lack of autism in the Amish people.  The Amish do...

Via Marianne PokeBunny Lenaerts
Riley Tuggle's insight:
I think this article explains an almost perfect example of how popular culture does effect what we do and how we live. The Amish do not eat all the unhealthy foods we do, like McDonalds, and they seem to live a better life (health wise). Also, this proves how folk culture is helpful in our world. We can see the comparison between our lives and theirs, and the conclusions may even help us in the near future. -RT
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Marianne PokeBunny Lenaerts's curator insight, February 5, 2015 12:43 AM

http://www.jewsnews.co.il/2013/08/14/the-amish-dont-get-autism-and-they-dont-get-vaccinations-possible-link/

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, March 11, 2015 10:08 AM

The Amish an example of pop culture. We have several bad things here( regular people) like fast foods and different diseases like the influenza virus.  The Amish don't get vaccination but don't get sick this is a possible link because they live a healthier life style so airgo they don't need a vaccination 

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How to use the Google Research Tool to improve Essay Writing

How to use the Google Research Tool to improve Essay Writing | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Whilst the Google research tool has been a part of Google drive for a few
years now  It amazes me how few teachers and students are aware of what it
can do.

In short the research tool is the perfect accomplice for writing an essay
or creating a project.  It will not only provide you with all the facts and
answers you require but also cite them.  And that's just the beginning.

I have put together this six minute video tutorial to make every student
and teacher an expert around getting the

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Riley Tuggle's insight:

I think this is a great public and online service for many different people in various situations, from a fifth grader to a college student, it is very helpful. This service can also make it easier for teachers revise and check students' essays for any errors. Again, college students can improve any speeches or essays using this amazing tool. I would love to use this one day. -RT

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Corrie Martin's curator insight, January 31, 2015 7:07 PM

Great tool for students-- and it helps refine their natural tendancy to just "Google" it.

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China turns to UK for lessons in design and technology - Education - TES News

China turns to UK for lessons in design and technology - Education - TES News | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Breaking education news about schools and further education. Find leading opinion, podcasts, comment and analysis on education from TES News

Via Abraham Tumuti
Riley Tuggle's insight:

When I first read the title for this article I thought, "But China is practically KNOWN for having very intelligent students?". I didn't know why they would need help in education in any way, but after reading the article, I discovered that not many people were interested in design and technology, and that is the reason they needed help from the UK: they wanted to learn how to apply creativity to their education. -RT

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American Museum of Agriculture kills two healthy mules for realistic exhibit | Write... and Ride

American Museum of Agriculture kills two healthy mules for realistic exhibit | Write... and Ride | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Welcome to the American Museum of Agriculture. Their vision is to build a first-class museum facility that will teach visitors where their food and fibre come from through artifacts, interpretive displays, and interactive exhibits.

 

"Their mission? To preserve the history of, tell the story of, and instill pride in American agriculture and values. Even if it means killing to do so..."


@FranJurga writes: Can exhibits be too realistic? The American Museum of Agriculture is drawing fire for its new exhibit featuring stuffed--and intentionally killed--mules. The Write & Ride blog eloquently challenges the mindset that would send an educational institution out shopping for animals to kill in the name of education.

 

Click on the big bold headline or on the photo to read the article.


Via Fran Jurga
Riley Tuggle's insight:

I think this is so sad and cruel to do this. They killed two perfectly healthy mules that were only 28 and 32 years old when they can live up to 50. Why? Just to be put in an art exhibit. They could have easily take pictures and videos to show mules and how they live. They certainly should not have killed 2 innocent mules. 

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Rachael Johns's curator insight, October 24, 2014 10:23 AM

The man who wrote this has more common sense than the museum that parents for many years has trusted to teach their kids. Instead of posting a video of the mules showing how they work they stuff them and make it where they cant move at all. Animal cruelty is NOT okay

bobby isham's curator insight, November 5, 2014 7:21 PM

I dont think it is right for them to slaughter healthy animals for show when they have a long time left to live. Using two stuffed mules to show how they are used by farmers in the field doesn't make any sense at all. Farmers did not use dead mules for work.

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Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article.


Via Seth Dixon
Riley Tuggle's insight:

I believe India has more men than women because sometimes when women can't have a son for their first or second child, the men would beat the women to death, or in some instances women are captured and sold for wives, and they may commit suicide they are so depressed. Also, some pregnant women find out their baby is a girl, they would aport or abandon her because sons are apparently more important and successful because they would stay home and take care of their parents when they are elderly and they would carry on the families name. -rt

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Scott D.Warner, PLS's curator insight, August 3, 2013 4:59 PM

Various historical essays on population have captured the attention of many who may have otherwise tended to be indifferent to what had been obvious to the authors all along.

Scott D.Warner, PLS's comment, August 3, 2013 5:03 PM
Population density dependent malfunctions in societies include crime, disease, and even war.
MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

This is fantastic - have a look at various countries and their 'rate' of growth

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Here's Which Disease Is Most Likely To Kill You Depending On Where You Live

Here's Which Disease Is Most Likely To Kill You Depending On Where You Live | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Most of the world will die of heart disease.

Via Jordan Schemmel
Riley Tuggle's insight:

I believe heart disease is the most likely disease to kill citizens of the US because we have so many fatty foods to choose from up and down the aisle in about every local grocery store. Our kids are raised to think that eating junk food is perfectly okay, but once they get older it won't be. They will eat more and more fat-filled food until they weigh 300 pounds and have multiple diseases, including heart disease. We need to educate kids, especially in elementary school, how harmful these foods can be to our bodies. I realize that we try now, but maybe we need to try a little harder. I suggest we could replace cookies which a healthy but still delicious treat, such as a sweet fruit. This would help tremendously to help keep young children healthier in my opinion. Overall, we would making these changing for the better, keeping our country healthy and our bodies moving. 

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Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, June 16, 2014 3:28 PM

The epidemiological transition is a key element of the demographic transition - in itself explaining how and when differently developed portions of the world lose population. Take a look at this map and see if you can locate any major trends!

AmandaWilhiteee's curator insight, August 27, 2014 9:32 AM

Heart disease makes sense for a place like the United States, but other countries, I was surprised about. In a lot of countries, people were most likely to die from HIV or AIDS. Some of those countries are expected, but others, I wouldn't have expected. Also, in a few countries, people were most likely to die from Liver Cancer, which also came as a surprise. AW :)