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The Case for Cul-de-Sacs

The Case for Cul-de-Sacs | Human Geography | Scoop.it
People who live in them actually have greater social cohesion, according to one sociologist.

 

Thomas R. Hochschild Jr. actually first encountered the social cohesion of cul-de-sacs in his latest research when he wandered into one in Connecticut with his clipboard and polo shirt, and someone called the cops.  That never happened on the other types of streets he was studying, places where it would turn out the neighbors didn't know each other as well, and it was less clear who "belonged." Repeatedly, though, he found at the end of cul-de-sacs families who watched each others' children and took in each others' mail, who barbequed and orchestrated the removal of snow together, and who considered each other close friends. In cul-de-sacs, these families had a stronger sense of shared social space and territoriality. An outsider stood out.


Via Seth Dixon
Matt Richardson's insight:

Interesting article about suburban design.

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Richard Thomas's curator insight, February 23, 2014 3:56 PM

Consider those at home all day without transport or close family, who may be seemingly 'trapped' (with children).

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 23, 2014 8:33 PM

Living in a cul-de-sac sounds very inviting.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 24, 2014 1:32 PM

I lived in a col-de-sac for a number of years. My family and I had very close relationships with our two neighbors within our col-de-sac. We had parties together and helped each other out in times of need - this article is spot on.  

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The Bonkers Real-Life Plan to Drain the Mediterranean and Merge Africa and Europe

The Bonkers Real-Life Plan to Drain the Mediterranean and Merge Africa and Europe | Human Geography | Scoop.it
It's not just the plot of a Philip K. Dick book—a man spent his life trying to make Atlantropa happen.
Matt Richardson's insight:
Never mind that the logistics of pumping out the Mediterranean and Black Seas would be impossible, or that the ecological damage to fisheries, birds, and everything else would be catastrophic; forget the boundary disputes that would inevitably arise, and the climatic ruin that would ensue without water in the sea...this plan is so audacious that it is fun to think about.
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Analysis | This thin ribbon of land separates North and South Korea. Why should we care?

Analysis | This thin ribbon of land separates North and South Korea. Why should we care? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Korean Demilitarized Zone was established as a buffer zone between North Korea and South Korea following the 1953 armistice in the Korean War. It divides the peninsula roughly in half and is about 160 miles across and 2.5 miles wide. More than 25 million South Koreans live under threat from North Korean heavy artillery just across the border.
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If Americans Can Find North Korea on a Map, They’re More Likely to Prefer Diplomacy

If Americans Can Find North Korea on a Map, They’re More Likely to Prefer Diplomacy | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Most Americans could not identify the country in a survey, and those people tended to view military action more favorably.
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Driven by unrest and violence, Venezuelans are fleeing their country by the thousands

Driven by unrest and violence, Venezuelans are fleeing their country by the thousands | Human Geography | Scoop.it
As many as 500,000 Venezuelans have fled their country in the last two years — an exodus triggered by social unrest, violence and corruption.
Matt Richardson's insight:
A new refugee crisis is unfolding in South America.
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A massive storm flooded Houston. Experts say California’s state capital could be next.

A massive storm flooded Houston. Experts say California’s state capital could be next. | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A levee failure could submerge some Sacramento neighborhoods in up to 20 feet of water.
Matt Richardson's insight:
California's agricultural economy is a major engine of its enormous economy. Much of the agriculture of its huge Central Valley depends upon aging water infrastructure that is in danger of failing. There are very few more critical ways that geographers can directly help citizens and land developers than by providing accurate flood maps to help demonstrate what might happen if infrastructure like dams and levees fail.
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Singapore Will Stop Increasing Car Numbers From February 2018

Singapore Will Stop Increasing Car Numbers From February 2018 | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Singapore, among the world’s most expensive places to own a vehicle, will stop increasing the total number of cars on its roads next year.
Matt Richardson's insight:
As global population and affluence rises, the need to mitigate the environmental damage, expense, and space requirements of private automobiles increases. Singapore, a wealthy island nation in Southeast Asia, has a novel solution for pushing its citizens to find alternative means of transportation: cap the number of cars on the road.
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‘Shrinking, shrinking, shrinking’: Puerto Rico faces a demographic disaster

‘Shrinking, shrinking, shrinking’: Puerto Rico faces a demographic disaster | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Even before Maria, the island’s population and economy had suffered a decade of decline.
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Why Puerto Rico’s Electric Grid Stood No Chance Against Maria

Why Puerto Rico’s Electric Grid Stood No Chance Against Maria | Human Geography | Scoop.it
More than two weeks after Hurricane Maria crashed into Puerto Rico on Sept. 20, Allan Rivera had still not had a full night’s sleep. “Every three hours … I ge…
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Dharavi redevelopment will push for a slum-free Mumbai, says Devendra Fadnavis

Dharavi redevelopment will push for a slum-free Mumbai, says Devendra Fadnavis | Human Geography | Scoop.it
“Making Mumbai slum-free was part of the comprehensive plan and it supplements the ambitious Centre-state project of affordable housing for all," Devendra Fadnavis said
Matt Richardson's insight:
If you haven't seen it, watch Kevin McCloud's "Slumming It" by BBC on Youtube. It is a phenomenal look at the complexity of the Dharavi slum.
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The Media Really Has Neglected Puerto Rico

The Media Really Has Neglected Puerto Rico | Human Geography | Scoop.it
While Puerto Rico suffers after Hurricane Maria, much of the U.S. media (FiveThirtyEight not excepted) has been occupied with other things.
Matt Richardson's insight:
New computerized analytics can shed light on which geographical regions are more discussed than others.
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It’s been 50 years since Britain left. Why are so many African judges still wearing wigs?

It’s been 50 years since Britain left. Why are so many African judges still wearing wigs? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The debate over the legacy of colonialism in Africa rages on.
Matt Richardson's insight:
Stimulus diffusion is diffusion in which one people receives a culture element from another but gives it a new and unique form. In this case, the hierarchical diffusion of legal customs enforced by colonizers in Africa has been replaced by local legal systems, but features such as wig-wearing remain. (The wigs themselves are spread through relocation diffusion, from a factory to judges, but the tradition of wearing wigs was stimulated by a now bygone custom.)
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This ‘fatberg’ clogging a London sewer is longer than two football fields, weighs more than 11 buses

This ‘fatberg’ clogging a London sewer is longer than two football fields, weighs more than 11 buses | Human Geography | Scoop.it
"The sewers are not an abyss for household rubbish,” said Thames Water’s head of waste networks, Matt Rimmer.
Matt Richardson's insight:
London's sewer system has always been a place of legendary foulness -- from Victorian era "toshers" who combed through the underground sludge looking for coins, to plague-bearing rats as big as toasters, to cholera, to discarded corpses.

It is worth remembering that INFRASTRUCTURE such as this was (and remains) a vital ingredient to keeping the streets above clean and healthful.

Dr. Snow's 19th century "cholera map" showing deaths surrounding the Broad Street pump was an innovation in epidemiology. His use of geographic reasoning helped make a connection between London's disease filled sewers and contaminated water from the pump. The resulting epiphany helped save countless future lives as people began to build better barriers between drinking water and human waste.

Here is an article showing exactly how heroic the people are who maintain infrastructure like this, irrespective of whether it is in London, New York, or Chiang Mai. 
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The World’s First Permanent Nuclear-Waste Repository

The World’s First Permanent Nuclear-Waste Repository | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Buried deep under an island in the Baltic, the world’s first permanent nuclear-waste repository is nearing completion. If all goes according to plan, future generations may not know it’s there.
Matt Richardson's insight:
Location studies are an important part of Geography. Why would this location be chosen over others?
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Cholera pandemics are fueled by globe-trotting bacterial strains

Cholera pandemics are fueled by globe-trotting bacterial strains | Human Geography | Scoop.it
International cholera strains, rather than local ones, have caused raging epidemics, according to research that examined the bacteria’s DNA.
Matt Richardson's insight:
Disease vectors are subject to the same forces and limitations to movement as the people who carry them.
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The great sprawl of China: timelapse images reveal 30-year growth of cities

The great sprawl of China: timelapse images reveal 30-year growth of cities | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Timelapse videos show the staggering growth of cities such as Shenzhen, Dongguan and Yiwu, which three decades ago were barely on the map
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How sheep with cameras got some tiny islands onto Google Street View

How sheep with cameras got some tiny islands onto Google Street View | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Faroe Islands, which isn't even on some world maps, put a small brigade of ovine videographers in charge of what it called “Sheepview.”
Matt Richardson's insight:
This story was too much fun not to include here.
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Analysis | Nobody listened to Luther at first. That’s why he succeeded.

Analysis | Nobody listened to Luther at first. That’s why he succeeded. | Human Geography | Scoop.it
He was able to build his support only because it took so long for word to spread.
Matt Richardson's insight:
Diffusion is central to geographic analysis. This article makes a case that today's communication revolution has altered the ways ideas spread so fundamentally that, had it occurred during the Reformation, it might have prevented the revolution from occurring at all.
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Bangkok Post article

Bangkok Post article | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Matt Richardson's insight:
Blending religious customs in Thailand demonstrates the depth of religious life in an area that blends tribal beliefs, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Here is a link to an elaborate funeral pyre for a dead Thai king that demonstrates similar complexity: http://www.bbc.com/news/video_and_audio/must_see/41718144/thai-king-funeral-the-royal-pyre-built-over-a-year
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Tell us where Amazon’s second headquarters should go, March Madness-style

Tell us where Amazon’s second headquarters should go, March Madness-style | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Then come back on Friday for a Facebook Live event where we'll trade notes.
Matt Richardson's insight:
"Industrial Location" is a major and important part of geographical science. It blends a mixture of political, economic, and site-based metrics to establish where a company will likely make money.
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China Is Quietly Reshaping the World

China Is Quietly Reshaping the World | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The staggering scope of the country’s infrastructure initiative—and what it means for the international order
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This piece about China's infrastructure spending demonstrates how economic development and geopolitics are interlinked.
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Cities Don’t Really Know How Riders Use Their Subways. London Has a Clever Way to Find Out.

Cities Don’t Really Know How Riders Use Their Subways. London Has a Clever Way to Find Out. | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Tube is getting clever.
Matt Richardson's insight:
This is a fascinating piece about how geographic data is culled using a clever methodology.
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Mass Shootings Are A Bad Way To Understand Gun Violence

Mass Shootings Are A Bad Way To Understand Gun Violence | Human Geography | Scoop.it
It’s impossible to say when the first mass shooting in America took place. Plant your shovel in the internet and you’ll find one event described that way, and t…
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Al Jazeera World - The Rohingya: Silent Abuse

The Rohingya: Silent Abuse Myanmar, formerly known as Burma, has a population of around 51 million people. The Burman ethnic group constitutes aroun
Matt Richardson's insight:
This is a good background video explaining the Rohingya's current plight. Although this film is less than a month old, the recent events in Myanmar in which hundreds of thousands of people are fleeing genocide are not shown here.
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America's 'Racial Generation Gap' Is Starting to Shrink

America's 'Racial Generation Gap' Is Starting to Shrink | Human Geography | Scoop.it
And with it, the existing tensions between older whites and diverse young people will begin to ease.
Matt Richardson's insight:
Interesting piece on demographics and strife in modern America. Demographers use geography as a key tool for mapping populations.
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‘Textbook example of ethnic cleansing’: 370,000 Rohingyas flood Bangladesh as crisis worsens

‘Textbook example of ethnic cleansing’: 370,000 Rohingyas flood Bangladesh as crisis worsens | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The U.S. is “alarmed” by allegations of killings and village burning by the Burmese military.
Matt Richardson's insight:
The nation of Burma/Myanmar has engaged in ethnic cleansing in the past, but the Rohingyas have been a "stateless" minority in crisis for many years as the ethnic majority violently removes them from their homes.
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