Human Geography
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How soon will Houston pass Chicago?

How soon will Houston pass Chicago? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Population growth has practically stopped in Chicago. So how long will it be until Houston is the nation's third-largest city?
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Residential Street Pattern Design

Residential Street Pattern Design | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Matt Richardson's insight:
Street layouts impact nearly every aspect of city life. This article is slightly technical, but has some good visuals and charts to help identify the pros and cons of various layouts.
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A Physicist Turns the City Into an Equation - The New York Times

A Physicist Turns the City Into an Equation - The New York Times | Human Geography | Scoop.it
What makes a city grow and thrive? What causes it to stagnate and fall? Geoffrey West thinks the tools of physics can give us the answers.
Matt Richardson's insight:
West's Ted Talk on youtube and a Radiolab episode featuring his work are fascinating, too.
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Rural life and the exodus of youth in Transnistria - The

Rural life and the exodus of youth in Transnistria - The | Human Geography | Scoop.it
In the early 1990s, when the Soviet Union was about to collapse and Moldova proclaimed its independence, one of the regions of the Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic decided to stray, becoming the self-proclaimed republic of Transnistria.
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When Malls Saved the Suburbs From Despair

When Malls Saved the Suburbs From Despair | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Like it or not, the middle class became global citizens through consumerism—and they did so at the mall.
Matt Richardson's insight:
"The Mall" was an immensely important part of my childhood and teenage years. As both a mega-bazaar and modern caravanserai, these behemoth  structures were gathering points for the sacred ritual of "shopping" -- an activity that meant strolling from store to store, examining merchandise, dreaming of who you might become with the latest accessory, socializing along the way. This is a fun article that captures some of that magic. 

It also contains many interesting glimpses into where we are now versus back then. 

Where were malls located and why?

Why did these spaces become less desirable commercially and therefore socially?

Why do some still thrive?

How does the new pattern of online shopping influence "brick and mortar" a.k.a. physical retail? 

How is the physical supply chain (warehouses etc) different today versus when malls reigned supreme? 

Race/gender/class/tribe (sociological) analysis, economic geography...the list of possible angles to examine this is endless.


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"Smart" Cities and Urban Design are Hogwash

"Smart" Cities and Urban Design are Hogwash | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Digital stardust won’t magically make future cities more affordable or resilient.
Matt Richardson's insight:
  This article represents a rare critique of urban design and the notion that "smart" cities will replace current urban agglomerations. See what you think.
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Ending Gerrymandering Won’t Fix What Ails America

Ending Gerrymandering Won’t Fix What Ails America | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Gerrymandering. It’s become the embodiment of so many of the evils in the U.S. political system. Frustrated by the lack of competitive elections? Blame gerryman…
Matt Richardson's insight:
Interesting piece on the power of gerrymandering and other demographic trends that shape America's geographical/political landscape.
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Walmart Nation: Mapping the Largest Employers in the U.S.

Walmart Nation: Mapping the Largest Employers in the U.S. | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Walmart employs 1.5 million people across the country - and the retail behemoth is now the largest private employer in 22 states.
Matt Richardson's insight:
This is an interesting look at the largest employers in the US. Why the regional differences?
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Quebec urges shopkeepers to stop saying 'Hi'

Quebec urges shopkeepers to stop saying 'Hi' | Human Geography | Scoop.it

The unofficial greeting in the bilingual Canadian city of Montreal has long been a friendly 'Bonjour, Hi!' But that standard is no more since a motion mandating store clerks to greet customers only in French was passed in Quebec's provincial legislature. The move reaffirms French as the primary language in the province, where use of English can be controversial. The motion - which is not a law - was passed unanimously, but the province's premier called the debate 'ridiculous'. Introduced by the fiercely Francophile Parti Quebecois, the motion 'invites all businesses and workers who enter into contact with local and international clients to welcome them warmly with the word bonjour'."


Via Seth Dixon
Matt Richardson's insight:
The actions of the Quebecois legislature to regulate free speech is a form of hierarchical diffusion. Here is a [slightly dated but good] video explaining the modern complexity of the French/English divide in Canada, especially as it relates to new immigrants.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 1, 2017 8:26 PM

This is a great example of how culture isn't just passively received, but it's actively constructed.  The call to defend cultural traits of a region to maintain it's local distinctiveness is oftentimes why a region has a strong sense of place.  

 

TagsCanadalanguage, placeculture, landscape

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The town that disappeared

The town that disappeared | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Across Russia, more than 200 towns and cities have been shut down and abandoned. Hundreds of thousands of Russians were left without jobs and homes.
Matt Richardson's insight:
Industrialized nations face similar dilemmas across the globe -- how to handle cities and towns that spring up in boom times, and vanish when the economy crashes. Here is an example of that in Russia.
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The Bonkers Real-Life Plan to Drain the Mediterranean and Merge Africa and Europe

The Bonkers Real-Life Plan to Drain the Mediterranean and Merge Africa and Europe | Human Geography | Scoop.it
It's not just the plot of a Philip K. Dick book—a man spent his life trying to make Atlantropa happen.
Matt Richardson's insight:
Never mind that the logistics of pumping out the Mediterranean and Black Seas would be impossible, or that the ecological damage to fisheries, birds, and everything else would be catastrophic; forget the boundary disputes that would inevitably arise, and the climatic ruin that would ensue without water in the sea...this plan is so audacious that it is fun to think about.
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Analysis | This thin ribbon of land separates North and South Korea. Why should we care?

Analysis | This thin ribbon of land separates North and South Korea. Why should we care? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Korean Demilitarized Zone was established as a buffer zone between North Korea and South Korea following the 1953 armistice in the Korean War. It divides the peninsula roughly in half and is about 160 miles across and 2.5 miles wide. More than 25 million South Koreans live under threat from North Korean heavy artillery just across the border.
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If Americans Can Find North Korea on a Map, They’re More Likely to Prefer Diplomacy

If Americans Can Find North Korea on a Map, They’re More Likely to Prefer Diplomacy | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Most Americans could not identify the country in a survey, and those people tended to view military action more favorably.
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The Atlas Of Redistricting

The Atlas Of Redistricting | Human Geography | Scoop.it
See how seven different ways of drawing congressional districts across the country — from pretty fair to seriously gerrymandered — could change the partisan and racial makeup of the U.S. House.
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Bike Share Oversupply in China: Huge Piles of Abandoned and Broken Bicycles

Bike Share Oversupply in China: Huge Piles of Abandoned and Broken Bicycles | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Gigantic piles of impounded, abandoned, and broken bicycles have become a familiar sight in many Chinese cities, after a rush to build up its new bike-sharing industry vastly overreached.
Matt Richardson's insight:
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Study: Mapping Apps May Make Traffic Worse

Study: Mapping Apps May Make Traffic Worse | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Apps like Waze, Google Maps, and Apple Maps may make traffic conditions worse in some areas, new research suggests.
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A New EPA Report Shows That Environmental Racism is Real

A New EPA Report Shows That Environmental Racism is Real | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A new report from the Environmental Protection Agency finds that people of color are much more likely to live near polluters and breathe polluted air—even as the agency seeks to roll back regulations on pollution.
Matt Richardson's insight:
This is not a new story by any means, but it is one supported again and again by data.
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Google's Attempt to Build a "Smart City" in Canada

Google's Attempt to Build a "Smart City" in Canada | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Will Toronto turn its residents into Alphabet’s experiment? The answer has implications for cities everywhere.
Matt Richardson's insight:
Designing urban infrastructure for the next generation of city dwellers is a fun and interesting challenge. Here is Google's attempt.
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'War and Cheese'

'War and Cheese' | Human Geography | Scoop.it
One very eccentric man claims to be Russia’s guardian angel of cheese.
Matt Richardson's insight:
This quick video demonstrates the nexus between political activity, economic sanctions, and economic development. It also shows an "upside" to protectionism -- when a country protects its local industries in order to further their maturity.
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Can Planet Earth Feed 10 Billion People?

Can Planet Earth Feed 10 Billion People? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Humanity has 30 years to find out.
Matt Richardson's insight:
This is a well written article that summarizes arguments about future population trends.
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The Strange Brands in Your Instagram Feed

The Strange Brands in Your Instagram Feed | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A new breed of online retailer doesn’t make or even touch products, but they’ve got a few other tricks for turning nothing into money.
Matt Richardson's insight:
Global commerce is as new as the late 15th century, but e-commerce is quite new. This article shows how technology and global capitalism are being shaped by new geographic realities -- that space, time, friction-of-distance, laws and cultural barriers matter less than before. Likely there are new geographical principles at work regarding cultural and economic connectivity of people across cyberspace.
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The 10 Worst River Basins Contributing to Ocean Plastics

The 10 Worst River Basins Contributing to Ocean Plastics | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"[A new paper], published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, calculates that rivers contribute between 410,000 and 4 million tonnes a year to oceanic plastic debris, with 88 to 95% [of that total] coming from only 10. Those rivers are the Yangtze, Yellow, Hai He, Pearl, Amur and Mekong in east Asia, the Indus and Ganges Delta in south Asia, and the Niger and Nile in Africa."


Via Seth Dixon
Matt Richardson's insight:
Baltimore harbor has an odd contraption that is scooping plastic out of Jones Falls before it reaches the outer harbor. If only this machine could operate in these 10 river systems, which are contributing waste to our embattled/trashed/overfished/warming oceans. .
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 19, 2017 8:09 PM

Of river-based plastic pollution, these 10 rivers are responsible for 88%-95% of all the plastic gyrating in the world's oceans.  Improvement in these key places could make a world of difference in improving marine ecosystems (NOTE: the map came from this alternative article on the same subject).

 

Tags: pollution, water, environmentsustainability, consumption, fluvial.

Matt Manish's curator insight, April 4, 12:44 PM
It struck me as odd to learn that the majority of plastic that winds up in the ocean isn't actually from ocean activities. Also, that these ten rivers contribute up to 88 to 95% of plastics in the ocean. This is a huge margin of these materials coming from these ten major river systems, most of them being in Asia. This makes me wonder why are mostly Asia's rivers carrying so much trash to ocean. It could be the major cities sitting along the banks that are dumping trash into the river and letting float down steam. Also, I wonder if there possibly isn't an efficient enough sanitation system set up in Asia which could lead to more people just throwing their trash into these rivers. To summarize, something from the data in this article tells me that their is a common denominator as to why most of the rivers that carry the largest amount of plastic materials to the ocean every year are located in Asia.
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Cities turn to ‘missing middle’ housing to keep older millennials from leaving

Cities turn to ‘missing middle’ housing to keep older millennials from leaving | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Duplexes, triplexes and smaller buildings can provide affordable alternatives to moving to suburbs, planners say.
Matt Richardson's insight:
Modern urban design tries to match the current and future housing needs of the city.
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Cholera pandemics are fueled by globe-trotting bacterial strains

Cholera pandemics are fueled by globe-trotting bacterial strains | Human Geography | Scoop.it
International cholera strains, rather than local ones, have caused raging epidemics, according to research that examined the bacteria’s DNA.
Matt Richardson's insight:
Disease vectors are subject to the same forces and limitations to movement as the people who carry them.
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The great sprawl of China: timelapse images reveal 30-year growth of cities

The great sprawl of China: timelapse images reveal 30-year growth of cities | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Timelapse videos show the staggering growth of cities such as Shenzhen, Dongguan and Yiwu, which three decades ago were barely on the map
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