Human Geography
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The Age of Borders

The Age of Borders | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The creation date of (almost) every international border.  Full-size image here."

 

Tags: infographic, worldwide, borders, political, historical.


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, February 23, 10:04 PM
Political Unit: History of  borders
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, February 27, 6:33 AM

Preliminary - Political Geography 

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Where Women Reign: An Intimate Look Inside a Rare Kingdom

Where Women Reign: An Intimate Look Inside a Rare Kingdom | Human Geography | Scoop.it
High in the Himalayas, the last matriarchs of the Mosuo people struggle to keep ancient traditions alive.

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10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex

10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Roughly half the countries around the world experience low fertility rates, and some get pretty creative in how they encourage procreation.

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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, September 7, 2017 7:23 AM
Seth Dixon's insight: While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates. While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates. Denmark Russia Japan Romania Singapore South Korea India (Parsis community) Italy Hong Kong Spain
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 8:55 PM

While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates.  While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates.  

 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

Ms. Amanda Fairchild's curator insight, October 16, 2017 1:21 PM
Examples of pro-natalist countries.
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The Recipe for Secession: What Makes Nations Leave | JSTOR Daily

The Recipe for Secession: What Makes Nations Leave | JSTOR Daily | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Secession doesn't come from one event, but is borne of economic disparities, identity crises, legislative failure, and bad blood.
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How the first city got started 12,000 years ago

"In this animated video, Jonathan F. P. Rose explains how the first city was started in Turkey, 12,000 years ago."


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Angel Peeples's curator insight, May 11, 2017 2:41 PM
  This article is related to world cultural by being about urbanization. My opinion on this article is that I cant believe that it was that long ago the first city started. Turkey was the first place of the first city because it was were agriculture started. I think it is pretty cool it all started with a structure that people just started building around. 
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 19, 2017 10:25 AM
unit 7
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 9:03 PM

What led to the first urban settlements? We know that the beginnings of agriculture are closely connected to the first forays into agriculture and the domestication of animals.  This brief video puts some archeological specificity on the though exercise, "what would you need to start the first city in a world without cities?" 

 

Tags: urban, placehistorical.

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The Incredible growth of megacities

The Incredible growth of megacities | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The world’s cities are booming and their growth is changing the face of the planet. Around 77 million people are moving from rural to urban areas each year. The latest UN World Cities Report has found that the number of “megacities” – those with more than 10 million people – has more than doubled over the past two decades, from 14 in 1995 to 29 in 2016. And whereas the developed world was once the home of the biggest cities, this map shows that it is now the developing world taking the lead."

 

Tags: urban, megacities, regions.


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Carson Dean Williamson's curator insight, May 11, 2017 10:43 AM
This relates to our chapter by showing some facts on mega cities. Mega cities are metropolitan areas that have a high population. These cities are the definition of urban development around the world. There is currently 29 mega cities (since 2016) around the world. This article showed the growth of mega cities and urban development of the city.
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 19, 2017 10:25 AM
unit 7
Melih Pekyatirmaci's curator insight, May 20, 2017 7:31 PM
Share your insight
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4 ways to make a city more walkable

4 ways to make a city more walkable | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Freedom from cars, freedom from sprawl, freedom to walk your city! City planner Jeff Speck shares his "general theory of walkability" -- four planning principles to transform sprawling cities of six-lane highways and 600-foot blocks into safe, walkable oases full of bike lanes and tree-lined streets.

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Mr Mac's curator insight, June 13, 2017 10:09 AM
Unit 7 - New Urbanism
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2017 8:01 PM
Enhancing urban liveability - creating better cities for the future
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2017 8:01 PM
Enhancing liveability
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Enclaves & Exclaves

Enclaves & Exclaves | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A tour of the world's engulfed and orphaned places.

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Mr Mac's curator insight, July 3, 2017 12:08 PM
Unit 1 - Mapping; Unit 3/4 - Ethnic Enclaves and Exclaves 
Allison Anthony's curator insight, July 5, 2017 6:08 PM

Political geography 

Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 9:01 PM

This storymap is a full length article about all the intricacies about enclaves and exclaves, but the interactive format, visuals and maps really make this much more than another article on the topic.    

 

Tags: borders, political, mappingESRIStoryMap.

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Why Early Globalization Matters: Crash Course Big History #206

Globalization has been in process for centuries, and has had a huge effect on Big History, and on Collective Learning. This week, Emily is investigating early globalization through three things that moved around the world and shaped collective learning in the early decades of globalization: Printing, Potatoes, and Plagues.

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Treathyl Fox's curator insight, July 15, 2017 10:28 AM
Printing, Potatoes, and Plagues.  Even without being an historian or watching the video, there is no doubt these 3 things had an impact on the whole wide world.
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Office Farming In Japan May Transform Agriculture

Human resources and recruitment firm Pasona Group dedicates one acre of their downtown Tokyo office building to growing and harvesting over 280 types o
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US fertility rate hits a record low

US fertility rate hits a record low | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The US fertility rate has dropped to the lowest number reported since fertility records started being kept more than a century ago, according to data released by National Center for Health Statistics.

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Barcelona Win Appeal Over Copa del Rey Flag Ban

Barcelona fans will be allowed to display Catalan flags at the Copa del Rey final after their appeal against a banning order was upheld.

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These 5 Facts Explain the Increasingly Tense Geopolitics in Asia

These 5 Facts Explain the Increasingly Tense Geopolitics in Asia | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Middle East gets all the attention, but Asia is a major security concern for the U.S. And the situation is getting more tense
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Without a Home, and Without Hope

Without a Home, and Without Hope | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Rohingyas have fled violent repression in Buddhist Myanmar for generations. In neighboring Bangladesh, refugee camps offer asylum, but life there remains bleak.

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Why India and Pakistan hate each other

Why India and Pakistan hate each other | Human Geography | Scoop.it
EVERY AFTERNOON AT sunset, at a point midway along the arrow-straight road between Amritsar and Lahore, rival squads of splendidly uniformed soldiers strut and stomp a 17th-century British military drill known as Beating Retreat (pictured). Barked commands, fierce glares and preposterously high kicks all signal violent intent.
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Infographic: North Korea by the Numbers

Infographic: North Korea by the Numbers | Human Geography | Scoop.it

North Korea – a country hard to illustrate by numbers and those available are based on estimates. Accordingly, this graphic intends to give an overview on relevant aspects of a country hardly known by outsiders. Overall, we know little about the isolated northern part of the Korean peninsula and what we know is mostly disturbing: The DPRK’s government headed by Kim Jong-un has recently launched another missile test, adding up to 14 tests only in 2017.

Besides that, the country is estimated to be among the most militarised on the globe with more than a million active soldiers and an air force counting 944 aircrafts in total. Thus, North Korea is ranked 23rd (out of 133 countries) for military spending which approximately amounts to $7.5 billion per year. According to the CIA, young adults are obliged to spend several years in the military service, women around seven and men even ten years.

But above all, North Korea is a country that is desperately poor. Out of an estimated 25,115,311 inhabitants, only 36 percent of the population has access to electricity and the GDP per capita amounts to $1,700 – similar to that of South Sudan.

 

Tags: North Korea, infographic.


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Christopher L. Story's curator insight, August 12, 2017 11:50 AM
'cause you know....Venezuela.  
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2017 7:53 PM
Political geography: global challenges
Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 29, 10:04 AM
North Korea is constantly in the news, but do we really know much about it. Before the US conflicts with Afghanistan and Iraq we all never very little about those countries. While we have had past history with North Korea, it is always good to understand the country and the people in the conflict. This is an easy info graphic to view and gives you simple knowledge on the country such as population, workforce number, military numbers, and other useful numbers that can be discussed.  As shown in the numbers military spending and military service time is a high priority which should not be a shocker if you ever turn on the news. However, one should also see that North Korea is a very poor country and most live in poverty. Very few have access to electricity and living conditions are not up to standards. So we can ask ourselves are the North Koreans spending money wisely? Well from this graphic probably not. We can begin to understand some of the issues (although there so many) with this country and why it can be a problem to the US and to the world.  A country basically run by a dictatorship with high military spending and a very high poverty rate is unacceptable. It would be fun to use other graphics on this page to begin to understand other countries as well, a good website to view. 
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This Map Shows The Literal Meaning Of Every State Name

This Map Shows The Literal Meaning Of Every State Name | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Flattened Water. Place of the Small Spring. Milky Water. At first glance, these phrases might look like just a jumble of words, but they’re actually something way cooler: the literal translation of three state names in the United States. Can you guess which ones? Expedia Canada put together this colorful map

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New Urbanism

"New Urbanism is a planning and development approach based on the principles of how cities and towns had been built for the last several centuries: walkable blocks and streets, housing and shopping in close proximity, and accessible public spaces. In other words: New Urbanism focuses on human-scaled urban design."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 15, 2017 8:58 AM

As the 2017 APHG exam has ended, some people have asked for more resources on new urbanism.  Here is information from New Urbanism (dot org) the Congress on New Urbanism for teachers and students that are reassessing the Free Response Questions. 

 

Tagsplace, neighborhood, urban, planning, urbanism, scale

aliyah marie scarb's curator insight, May 25, 2017 10:34 PM
New urbanism is a type of urbanization. In new urbanism, everything is built so that it's in walking distance of other things mostly such as Winn Dixie and McDonald's in Callahan. 
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 9:02 PM

As the 2017 APHG exam has ended, some people have asked for more resources on new urbanism.  Here is information from New Urbanism (dot org) the Congress on New Urbanism for teachers and students that are reassessing the Free Response Questions. 

 

Tagsplace, neighborhood, urban, planning, urbanism, scale

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Why geography matters for students now more than ever

Why geography matters for students now more than ever | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Students need to know human geography; they need to understand the relationships that exist between cultures.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 5, 2017 11:30 AM

This is more example of me preaching to the choir, but I hope that this will arm you with resources to use in discussions with administrators and colleagues in the fight against geographic ignorance.  This is a great article to put into my new tag of article that discuss why geography matters.   

 

Tagseducation, K12geography education, geography matters.

Brandon Fourie's curator insight, May 23, 2017 5:58 AM
Very interesting read! 
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 5, 2017 12:13 PM

This is one more example of me preaching to the choir, but I hope that this will arm you with resources to use in discussions with administrators and colleagues in the fight against geographic ignorance.  This is a great article to put into my new tag of article that discuss why geography matters.   

 

Tagseducation, K12geography education, geography matters.

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Boston schools ditch conventional world maps in favor of this one

Boston schools ditch conventional world maps in favor of this one | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Social studies classrooms throughout the Boston public school system are getting an upgrade some 448 years in the making.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 28, 2017 2:21 PM

Personally, I'm not a fan of this decision, but it's as if they watched the classic West Wing clip and decided to roll with it. I think that the Peters projection map is better than the Mercator for most educational applications, but it isn't the "right, best, or true" map projection.  Many viral videos comparing the two love to exaggerate and say things like "The maps you use are lying to you" or "the world is nothing like you've ever seen."  Yes, Mercator maps distorts relative size, but it isn't a "wrong" map anymore than the Peters projection.  All maps have distortion and map readers need to under that all maps are a mathematical representation of the Earth.  

 

Tags: mapping, visualization, map projections, cartography, perspectiveeducation, geography, geography educationBoston.

Prescott Kermit's comment, June 15, 2017 5:27 AM
http://www.free-tech-support.com/samsung-technical-support-number
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Five gentrification myths debunked

'Gentrification' is a messy bogeyman of a term deserving more critical analysis. If 'gentrification' is 'exclusive economic development', what we want is INCLUSIVE economic development.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 19, 2017 11:09 AM

This post will need many disclaimers, but I think that it is a valuable addition to our gentrification materials since the key take-home point is that gentrification doesn’t happen the same way in all places (geographic context matters!). Some of the generalizations about gentrification around the country might not apply to some specific examples.  Are these generalizations true in some (and possibly most) contexts?  Sure, but unfortunately once people hear the word gentrification, they assume a base set of assumptions about the situation which may or may not be true.  The 5 myths outlined in this video (more detail in this Washington Post article) are:

  1. Gentrification leads to lower crime.
  2. Gentrification causes widespread displacement.
  3. Longtime residents hate gentrification.
  4. Gentrifiers are white.
  5. Gentrification happens naturally.

Tags: neighborhood, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economic   

Mr Mac's curator insight, July 6, 2017 8:16 AM
Unit 7 - Gentrifications - specifically addressing "generalizations about Gentrification." 
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 9:01 PM

This post will need many disclaimers, but I think that it is a valuable addition to our gentrification materials since the key take-home point is that gentrification doesn’t happen the same way in all places (geographic context matters!). Some of the generalizations about gentrification around the country might not apply to some specific examples.  Are these generalizations true in some (and possibly most) contexts?  Sure, but unfortunately once people hear the word gentrification, they assume a base set of assumptions about the situation which may or may not be true.  The 5 myths outlined in this video (more detail in this Washington Post article) are:

  1. Gentrification leads to lower crime.
  2. Gentrification causes widespread displacement.
  3. Longtime residents hate gentrification.
  4. Gentrifiers are white.
  5. Gentrification happens naturally.

Tags: neighborhood, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economic   

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This computer programmer solved gerrymandering in his spare time

This computer programmer solved gerrymandering in his spare time | Human Geography | Scoop.it
We could take human error out of the redistricting process entirely. Why don't we?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 13, 2017 4:08 PM

This computer programmer (code word in the newspapers for geographers using GIS) has created a way to take the human element out of the redistricting process.  Dividing places into separate, formal regions is an important task, one that often times requires an intimate knowledge of the place, it's cultural, economic and physical characteristics.  That's how I would want things to been done in a perfect world, but partisan chicanery has led to so many gerrymandered districts that the human touch is what many of us fear more than a cold, impersonal division that does not take place, history, and community into account.    

 

Questions to Ponder: Do you trust the politicians that are in charge of your state to create better districts than computer-generated districts that are optimized for compactness?  What are some of the potential limitations of compact districts?  Would an independent committee/bipartisan group do a better job? How does the Voting Rights Act complicate the redistricting process?    

 

Tags: gerrymandering, politicalmapping, cartography, GIS, unit 4 political.

Madison Murphy's curator insight, May 16, 2017 2:34 PM
The Computer Programmer looks at gerrymandering in a different way by drawing boundary lines on his map and then comparing to show you the difference. This relates to the classroom by showing how gerrymandering draws lines of states but is illegal. This still exists and is bigger in political parties.
Mr Mac's curator insight, June 13, 2017 10:23 AM
Unit 1 - regions, GIS, Unit 4 - districts, gerrymandering (please note, saying "solved" might be a stretch as any districting will have to work on some form of bias) 
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Population, Sustainability, and Malthus

In which John Green teaches you about population. So, how many people can reasonably live on the Earth? Thomas Malthus got it totally wrong in the 19th century, but for some reason, he keeps coming up when we talk about population. In 1800, the human population of the Earth passed 1 billion, and Thomas Malthus posited that growth had hit its ceiling, and the population would level off and stop growing. He was totally right. Just kidding, he was totally wrong! There are like 7 billion people on the planet now! John will teach a little about how Malthus made his calculations, and explain how Malthus came up with the wrong answer. As is often the case, it has to do with making projections based on faulty assumptions. Man, people do that a lot.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 2017 4:15 PM

This is a succinct summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHGunit 2 population

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The Endangered Languages Project

The Endangered Languages Project is a website for people to find and share the most up-to-date and comprehensive information about the over 3,000 endangered ...

 

This short video is a great primer for understanding the importance of linguistic diversity.  Why the loss of linguistic diversity (a global phenomenon) related to other themes  on geography, such as political and economic autonomy for minority groups?  Why are so many languages vanishing today?  What forces are creating these emerging cultural patterns?  For more on the project, see: http://www.endangeredlanguages.com/


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 11:59 AM

This is a great website in which everyone should look at because it shows how everyone can come together and help preserve all these languages we all hear today. Day by day languages are becoming extinct because they are speaking English one of the most spoken languages in the world and everyone speaks it or speaks little of it that people can understand. More languages are becoming extinct day by day.

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The State Of The Kurds - Brilliant Maps

The State Of The Kurds - Brilliant Maps | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The map above shows the parts of the middle east with Kurdish populations and which could make up some or all of a future state of Kurdistan.

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