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Map: Where You Don’t Want to Be When It Hits the Fan

Map: Where You Don’t Want to Be When It Hits the Fan | human geography | Scoop.it
When it hits the fan America’s population centers will explode in violence, looting, and total breakdown of law and order.
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How is power divided in the United States government?

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-is-power-divided-in-the-united-states-government-belinda-stutzman Article II of the United States Constitution allows for three separate branches of government (legislative, executive, and judicial), along with a system of checks and balances should any branch get too powerful. Belinda Stutzman breaks down each branch and its constitutionally-entitled powers.

Lesson by Belinda Stutzman, animation by Johnny Chew.


Via Seth Dixon, austin melville
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Kimberly (Pope) Kindred's curator insight, April 17, 2013 12:08 AM

TED ED is one of the best resources I found for my classes this year. Great way to supplement lessons and content.

Rescooped by austin melville from Geography Education
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Do You Live In IHOP America Or Waffle House America?

Do You Live In IHOP America Or Waffle House America? | human geography | Scoop.it

There is a pretty ridiculous North-South split, although Maryland, northern Virginia, and southern Florida (which is pretty much the North anyways) fall into pancake territory, while Waffle House has made inroads into Ohio and Indiana.


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Hye-Hyun Kang's curator insight, January 9, 2014 11:35 PM

This article basically shows that South prefer waffles than pancakes. Although, there's very small part of Texas that prefers waffles over pancakes. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 2014 1:13 PM

This map shows how divided north and south are in terms of Pancakes and waffles, with Pancakes having a larger reach than waffles, and showing how regional differences are effected by something as odd as fast food.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 12, 2014 10:05 PM

I have never been to a Waffle House and I hate IHOP. I chose this article because the map popped out at me. It was like an IHOP take over with a poor Waffle House in the middle. However, it is interesting to see that when you open the article, the IHOP density comes out to  1,543, while Waffle House density comes out to 1,661. By looking at this map, you would think that IHOP would have the bigger density. Waffle House gets most of its business from states in the South, while IHOP seems to be all over the place, Northern and Southern states.

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Israel map throughout history

Israel map throughout history

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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Rescooped by austin melville from Geography Education
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Debating the U.S. Response to Syria

Debating the U.S. Response to Syria | human geography | Scoop.it

Students will:

Analyze the issues that frame the current debate on U.S. policy towards Syria.Consider the role of the U.S. public, the president, and Congress in the decision of whether to use military force.Work cooperatively within groups to integrate the arguments and beliefs of the options into a persuasive, coherent presentation.Explore, debate, and evaluate multiple perspectives on U.S. policy towards Syria through a role-play activity.
Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 4, 2013 4:49 PM

You want resources for teaching the most important geopolitical issue right now?  This set of resources from the Choices Program is just what you are looking for. 


Tags: SyriaMiddleEast, conflict, political.

Poppen Report's curator insight, September 6, 2013 11:51 PM

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-1031273

Rescooped by austin melville from History and Social Studies Education
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How is power divided in the United States government?

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-is-power-divided-in-the-united-states-government-belinda-stutzman Article II of the United States Constitution allows for three separate branches of government (legislative, executive, and judicial), along with a system of checks and balances should any branch get too powerful. Belinda Stutzman breaks down each branch and its constitutionally-entitled powers.

Lesson by Belinda Stutzman, animation by Johnny Chew.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kimberly (Pope) Kindred's curator insight, April 17, 2013 12:08 AM

TED ED is one of the best resources I found for my classes this year. Great way to supplement lessons and content.