AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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The Lost Boys, part two

The Lost Boys, part two | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Bob Simon first met the Lost Boys in a Kenyan refugee camp in 2001 after they had fled civil war in the Sudan. Some of the young men were relocated to the U.S. -- how are they doing now?
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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

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Allison Henley's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:35 PM

Very addicting even though I'm not that great at it!! haha

Matleena Laakso's curator insight, October 5, 2014 4:55 AM

Tämä on hauska, muutaman kerran on tullut "pelattua".

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:36 PM

Cool game that drops you down somewhere random in the world on street view, then asks you to guess where in the world you are

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The Two Koreas

The Two Koreas | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"While the Korean War of the early 1950s never formally ended, its aftermath has created starkly divergent worlds for those living on either side of the north-south divide. What follows is a look at life in the two Koreas; how such a night-and-day difference came to be; and where the crisis could go from here. Both governments claimed to be the legitimate rulers of the peninsula. Tensions between north and south gradually mounted, until finally, in June 1950, hundreds of thousands of North Korean troops stormed across the 38th parallel. The unsuspecting South Korean defenders were outgunned and outnumbered, and beat a hasty retreat southward."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 2, 3:30 PM

This excellent interactive was created by Esri's Story Maps team using the Story Map Cascade app--making it an great resources of the geography of the Korean Peninsula as well as a stellar example of how maps, infographics, videos, images and text can be combined using ArcGIS online.

 

Tags: mappingESRIStoryMapinfographic, visualizationNorth KoreaSouth Korea, East Asiaborders, political, geopolitics, historical.

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Geography undervalued in understanding of world

Geography undervalued in understanding of world | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Improving skills in ­literacy and numeracy are vitally important components of school education. But it is wrong to assume that these can only be achieved by teaching English and Mathematics respectively. Many other subjects can and do teach these skills using real life examples. Geography is one of these ­subjects. Articulating orally and in writing one’s understanding of the world is one sure way of increasing literacy. Collecting, analysing and using information about the world increases ­students’ numeracy, and gives them a better grounding as ­citizens and future employees. But geography is much more than this. Surely we should aspire to our children and ­grandchildren having a greater understanding of their world: what is happening around them, ­analysing the causes and ­assessing solutions?"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 13, 2017 3:07 PM

I know that understanding the importance of geography is nothing new to my readers, but I am gathering articles that are useful to share with administrators and colleagues in the fight against geographic ignorance.  One this site I've tagged these articles under tag "geography matters."  

 

Tagseducation, K12geography education, geography matters.

Matt Manish's curator insight, February 1, 1:39 PM
In this article, Roger Crofts explains how in most schools the main subject focus for students is literacy, math, science, and sometimes a foreign language. While social sciences such as geography usually get put on the back burner in the education system. He also makes the argument that geography helps teach imperative skills like literacy and math which is why this subject should have more of an emphasis in school settings. In response to Crofts' article and from my own experience in public schools, his article lines right up with what I was taught when I was younger. When I was in high school, there was a heavy push to learn math, literacy, and science, and also to be tested on these subjects with standardized tests. I feel that there should be a heavy emphasis on these subjects in schools, but there should also still be room for other classes that are creative and help to mold well rounded individuals. Furthermore, I believe this could become possible if standardized tests occurred less and more focus was put on the actual student rather than their standardized test scores.
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GeoSettr

GeoSettr | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

In May 2013, GeoGuessr came online and quickly became a favorite quiz game of geo-enthusiasts.  Using 5 random locations in Google Street View.  The game player can search the area in Street View and then make a guess as to where it is on the map.  Using GeoSettr, you can create your own GeoGuessr challenge by choosing five locations on Google Street View.


Via Seth Dixon, Jodi Esaili
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 30, 9:23 AM

You can customize your own GeoGuessr quizzes now, as others pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape you selected and find more context clues as to where that location is.  Try my sample quiz that I made based on these 5 clues.   

  1. The best place to get clam cakes and doughboys in RI
  2. My hometown is home to this center of athletic excellence
  3. This monument was a part of my research in this Latin American city
  4. This is where I went to school to get my Ph.D.
  5. Home to the movie “Close Encounters,” this National Monument has always fascinated me.  

Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 30, 9:38 AM
Fun!! Scholary Geography Game!!
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America is changing. Bigoted slurs, immigration bans and racist rallies can't change that

America is changing. Bigoted slurs, immigration bans and racist rallies can't change that | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Conceived by a band of wealthy, white men who demanded freedom, America has developed into a multicultural, multiethnic community. Here are some of the ways our nation has become -- and will continue to grow -- more diverse.
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We’re creating cow islands

We’re creating cow islands | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The parts of the United States that have higher populations of dairy cows are in the West and northern states.

 

Milk has moved away from cities between 2001 and 2011. Red areas indicate less milk in 2011 than 2001, green areas mean more and a buff color designates a neutral milk region.

Almost every region where you see a dark red area indicating a sharp decline in production has a large and growing population center nearby.


Via Seth Dixon, Scarpaci Human Geography
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 2, 2017 5:51 PM

As many of you will notice, this continues the reversal of some patterns that von Thünen observed and put in his famous agricultural model. 

 

Questions to Ponder: Why did milk used to need to be produced close to the cities?  Why is the old pattern changing now? How is this changing regions?

 

Tags: models, food production, agribusiness, agriculture.

ava smith's curator insight, January 8, 11:24 PM
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Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 9:09 PM
I've never really wondered which parts of the country produce the milk I consume on a regular basis. But as the maps in this article show there are certain parts of country that are densely populated with cows for the sole purpose of producing milk. This article also indicates that the "cow islands" in the Southeastern part of the United States are becoming smaller, while the density of the "cow islands" in the Northern and Western parts of the country are increasing at a significantly steady rate. While reading this article, I learned more about where the most cows in the U.S. are producing milk and how that might affect the price of the milk I buy.
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Welcome to the land that no country wants

Welcome to the land that no country wants | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Bir Tawil is the last truly unclaimed land on earth: a tiny sliver of Africa ruled by no state, inhabited by no permanent residents and governed by no laws.

Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller
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bridget rosolanka's curator insight, March 23, 2016 8:28 AM

Both Sudan and Egypt claim the rightful border between their countries should include the Hala'ib Triangle on their side of the border.  This leaves Bir Tawil unclaimed and it pops up in the news when those hoping to create a micronation claim it.  This bizarre case exemplifies some important principles of political geography with a tangible example to test the limits of political sovereignty and what it take to be called a country.  If discussing the elements necessary to create a state, this article would help fuel a discussion, especially when some people are eager to create their own micronation.    

 

Tags: political, states, unit 4 political.

Tracy Ross's curator insight, March 23, 2016 10:50 AM

Both Sudan and Egypt claim the rightful border between their countries should include the Hala'ib Triangle on their side of the border.  This leaves Bir Tawil unclaimed and it pops up in the news when those hoping to create a micronation claim it.  This bizarre case exemplifies some important principles of political geography with a tangible example to test the limits of political sovereignty and what it take to be called a country.  If discussing the elements necessary to create a state, this article would help fuel a discussion, especially when some people are eager to create their own micronation.    

 

Tags: political, states, unit 4 political.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 2016 12:57 PM

Both Sudan and Egypt claim the rightful border between their countries should include the Hala'ib Triangle on their side of the border.  This leaves Bir Tawil unclaimed and it pops up in the news when those hoping to create a micronation claim it.  This bizarre case exemplifies some important principles of political geography with a tangible example to test the limits of political sovereignty and what it take to be called a country.  If discussing the elements necessary to create a state, this article would help fuel a discussion, especially when some people are eager to create their own micronation.    

 

Tags: political, states, unit 4 political.

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Brexit, UK, Great Britain, and England

"An update of an earlier sketch we did before Brexit, the situation has become a little more unclear since."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 15, 2017 8:56 PM

The difference between the UK, Great Britain, and England can be confusing (the short version can be shown on a map, but the long version is much more complicated than this).   This is an amusing look at how these complexities lead to real-world complications besides using the right toponym. 

 

David G Tibbs's curator insight, January 18, 7:00 PM

This short video discusses the complex situation of Brexit. Britain and Wales want to leave the European Union (EU). However, two members of the United Kingdom (UK) want to remain in the EU. Britain joined the EU in 1973 when it was called the European Economic Community. This community-focused on its nation's economy in an effort to build up the European Markets. In 1993 it reformed has a political and economic body known as the EU. Britain filed for separation from the EU in 2017, with much resistance from its partners in the EU and within its own country. 

Taylor Doonan's curator insight, February 15, 7:14 PM
This video quickly defines the different terminologies that can be used to define England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, and Ireland. The different terms include England, for England, Great Britain, when talking about England, Scotland and Wales, and the United Kingdom when talking about England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. The video also talks about  how in different sporting events this group of countries competes differently, sometimes they are Great Britain, sometimes the United Kingdom, sometimes the countries compete individually sometimes Northern Ireland competes with Ireland. This video described all these differences very well. 
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English--History and Connotations

"What is the difference between 'a hearty welcome' and 'a cordial reception'? In a brief, action-packed history of the English language, Kate Gardoqui explains why these semantically equal phrases evoke such different images."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 7, 2017 2:42 PM

This TED-ED video (and lesson) shows how the connotations of English words often times depend on the linguistic root (sweat--Germanic, perspire--Latin). English has obviously changed much over the years, but this other TED-ED video (and lesson) also shows some good language family information and traces it back to proto-Indo-European roots.

    

Tags: languagecultureEnglishTED, video.

Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 1:19 PM
It is very interesting to see how far the English language has come and how much is has changed over the past 1600 years. Adding to that it is intriguing to see what other languages had an influence on English. I knew that German and English were very similar languages which made sense that German had a large influence on the English language. Although, it did take me by surprise that French has made quite an impact on English as well. Also, that royal Englishmen spoke French for three centuries. That piece of information shocked me since France and England have had such a historic rivalry that lasted for centuries. Overall, I enjoyed this video and the border maps helped me to better understand the evolution of the English language.
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The Real Threat to Hinduism: The Slow Death of India's Rivers

The Real Threat to Hinduism: The Slow Death of India's Rivers | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Hinduism shares an intricate, intimate relationship with the climate, geography, and biodiversity of South Asia; its festivals, deities, mythology, scriptures, calendar, rituals, and even superstitions are rooted in nature. There is a strong bond between Hinduism and South Asia’s forests, wildlife, rivers, seasons, mountains, soils, climate, and richly varied geography, which is manifest in the traditional layout of a typical Hindu household’s annual schedule. Hinduism’s existence is tied to all of these natural entities, and more prominently, to South Asia’s rivers.

 

Hinduism as a religion celebrates nature’s bounty, and what could be more representative of nature’s bounty than a river valley? South Asian rivers have sustained and nourished Hindu civilizations for centuries. They are responsible for our prosperous agriculture, timely monsoons, diverse aquatic ecosystems, riverine trade and commerce, and cultural richness.  Heavily dammed, drying in patches, infested by sand mafia and land grabbers, poisoned by untreated sewage and industrial waste, and hit by climate change — our rivers, the cradle of Hinduism, are in a sorry state.

 

If there is ever a threat to Hinduism, this is it. Destroy South Asia’s rivers and with it, Hinduism’s history and mythology will be destroyed. Rituals will turn into mockery, festivals, a farce, and Hinduism itself, a glaring example of man’s hypocritical relationship with nature. The fact that we worship our rivers as mothers and then choke them to death with all sorts of filth is already eminent.


Via Seth Dixon
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, January 4, 8:18 PM

Environmental change and human impacts 

Reasons for effective management 

Brian Weekley's comment, January 5, 9:26 AM
Seth- here is another article from a few years back about this same thing. http://www.newsweek.com/2015/10/02/ganges-river-dying-under-weight-modern-india-375347.html
Matt Manish's curator insight, February 1, 2:31 PM
Gauri Noolkar, explains in this article how much of Hinduism is related to India's nature, and how influential the Indian continent's river systems are on the country's leading religion. Noolkar, informs her audience about how pollution and greed for natural resources is killing the riverbeds of India. Which ultimately is leading to a negative impact on Hinduism in India, since much of the religion is influenced by the country's many rivers. For example, numerous Hindus make pilgrimages to and along the many famous rivers of India. Also, there are many religious sites erected next to rivers in India such as ghats which are stairs leading down into these rivers. These pilgrimages and religious sites are being affected by India's rivers by being dammed, polluted, dried up, and filled with toxic waste. Noolkar concludes her article by proclaiming that if Hinduism in India is to survive, drastic steps need to be taken in order to restore and preserve India's ancient river basins.
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7 Billion: How Did We Get So Big So Fast? | SKUNK BEAR

http://skunkbear.tumblr.com It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improve

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Fun Facts, Weird Facts, Funny Facts, Interesting Facts - SoTrueFacts.comEnglish has only one word for 'love'. Sanskrit has 96.

Fun Facts, Weird Facts, Funny Facts, Interesting Facts - SoTrueFacts.comEnglish has only one word for 'love'. Sanskrit has 96. | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
English has only one word for 'love'. Sanskrit has 96.

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The History of Appalachian English: Why We Talk Differently | Appalachian Magazine

The History of Appalachian English: Why We Talk Differently | Appalachian Magazine | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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How the letters of the alphabet got their names

How the letters of the alphabet got their names | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
There seems to be little predictability to the English names for the letters of the alphabet, to say nothing of the names of letters in other languages. Some begin with an e-as-in-egg sound (eff, ell); some end in an ee sound (tee, dee); and others have no obvious rhyme or reason to them at all. How did they get that way?

 

Tags: language, culture, historical, English.


Via Seth Dixon, Scarpaci Human Geography
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China is planting 6.6 million hectares of new forest — almost the size of Ireland

China is planting 6.6 million hectares of new forest — almost the size of Ireland | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The government of China has announced its plans to plant forests in 2018 that will occupy at least 6.6 million hectares, equivalent to the size of Ireland.

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How Does the U.S. Census Bureau Define Rural?

"The U.S. Census Bureau has designed a multimedia application experience, a story map, called 'Rural America: How Does the U.S. Census Bureau Define Rural?' This story map contains interactive web maps, tables, information, and images to help explain how the Census Bureau defines 'rural.' Many rural communities rely on American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year estimates, rather than ACS 1-year estimates, because of population thresholds. This story map helps data users understand the history and definition of 'rural.' Watch this video and then visit the story map to learn more." Visit the Story Map: http://go.usa.gov/x8yPZ  


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 17, 2017 11:19 AM

Census geography brings statistical data to life as seen in their newly designed interactive story map, called "Rural America: How Does the U.S. Census Bureau Define 'Rural?" Not only does this story map helps explain how the Census Bureau defines rural, but it displays some fantastic data that helps students to explore rural America.  Many APHG teachers refer to unit 5 as the "ag unit" but the full title, Agriculture, food production, and rural land use, certainly does highlight why this can be a valuable resource.  

 

Tags: rural, census, regions, mappingESRIStoryMap.

Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 10:57 PM
The U.S. Census Bureau defines "rural" as an area with less than 50,000 people living in it. The majority of the United States is actually considered rural while a small minority of the country is labeled as urban. But interestingly enough, most rural areas are clustered around urban areas rather than in random locations. It seems as though the further out one ventures out from the center of an urban area like a major city, the more the population begins to decrease. One can also see in the same situation, the area transition from urban to rural. U.S. Census data can tell us a lot about populations in rural and urban areas and the correlation between them which can be important to know for many reasons.
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Strava Heat Map and National Security

Strava Heat Map and National Security | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A fitness tracking app and national security don’t seem to be connected, and yet this month, the Pentagon has spent serious time discussing how to mitigate the impact Strava’s global data set being post online."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 31, 1:03 PM

Geospatial intelligence is a knife that cuts both ways. We must consider all the possible ramifications of what might happen as we repackage, render and display geographic information.

 

Questions to Ponder: What are three discernible patterns that you can identify by analyzing the Strava Heatmap? What does this particular case study show for cartographers and others interesting in creating spatial information? What does this say for regular people now fully immersed in the midst of a geospatial revolution?

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This week on "Sunday Morning" (Jan. 14)

This week on "Sunday Morning" (Jan. 14) | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A look at the features for this week's broadcast of the Emmy Award-winning news program
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Mo Rocca's ability to explain government in his pieces is superb. This should be good!
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How the letters of the alphabet got their names

How the letters of the alphabet got their names | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
There seems to be little predictability to the English names for the letters of the alphabet, to say nothing of the names of letters in other languages. Some begin with an e-as-in-egg sound (eff, ell); some end in an ee sound (tee, dee); and others have no obvious rhyme or reason to them at all. How did they get that way?

 

Tags: language, culture, historical, English.


Via Seth Dixon, Scarpaci Human Geography
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Brexit, UK, Great Britain, and England

"An update of an earlier sketch we did before Brexit, the situation has become a little more unclear since."


Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 15, 2017 8:56 PM

The difference between the UK, Great Britain, and England can be confusing (the short version can be shown on a map, but the long version is much more complicated than this).   This is an amusing look at how these complexities lead to real-world complications besides using the right toponym. 

 

David G Tibbs's curator insight, January 18, 7:00 PM

This short video discusses the complex situation of Brexit. Britain and Wales want to leave the European Union (EU). However, two members of the United Kingdom (UK) want to remain in the EU. Britain joined the EU in 1973 when it was called the European Economic Community. This community-focused on its nation's economy in an effort to build up the European Markets. In 1993 it reformed has a political and economic body known as the EU. Britain filed for separation from the EU in 2017, with much resistance from its partners in the EU and within its own country. 

Taylor Doonan's curator insight, February 15, 7:14 PM
This video quickly defines the different terminologies that can be used to define England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, and Ireland. The different terms include England, for England, Great Britain, when talking about England, Scotland and Wales, and the United Kingdom when talking about England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. The video also talks about  how in different sporting events this group of countries competes differently, sometimes they are Great Britain, sometimes the United Kingdom, sometimes the countries compete individually sometimes Northern Ireland competes with Ireland. This video described all these differences very well. 
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Don’t panic: Consumer debt boom is driven by rich borrowers, not the vulnerable poor 

Don’t panic: Consumer debt boom is driven by rich borrowers, not the vulnerable poor  | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The boom in consumer borrowing is driven by Britons with strong credit ratings, not the vulnerable borrowers who would worry regulators the most, Bank of England and Financial Conduct Authority researchers have found.

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English--History and Connotations

"What is the difference between 'a hearty welcome' and 'a cordial reception'? In a brief, action-packed history of the English language, Kate Gardoqui explains why these semantically equal phrases evoke such different images."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 7, 2017 2:42 PM

This TED-ED video (and lesson) shows how the connotations of English words often times depend on the linguistic root (sweat--Germanic, perspire--Latin). English has obviously changed much over the years, but this other TED-ED video (and lesson) also shows some good language family information and traces it back to proto-Indo-European roots.

    

Tags: languagecultureEnglishTED, video.

Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 1:19 PM
It is very interesting to see how far the English language has come and how much is has changed over the past 1600 years. Adding to that it is intriguing to see what other languages had an influence on English. I knew that German and English were very similar languages which made sense that German had a large influence on the English language. Although, it did take me by surprise that French has made quite an impact on English as well. Also, that royal Englishmen spoke French for three centuries. That piece of information shocked me since France and England have had such a historic rivalry that lasted for centuries. Overall, I enjoyed this video and the border maps helped me to better understand the evolution of the English language.
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Human Population Through Time

It took 200,000 years for our human population to reach 1 billion—and only 200 years to reach 7 billion. But growth has begun slowing, as women have fewe

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Why Z-lennials will upend Western brands' China strategy

Why Z-lennials will upend Western brands' China strategy | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Chinese Z-lennials are still young, and their lifestyle preference is significantly shaped by that of their parents as well as their environment ..."


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How the letters of the alphabet got their names

How the letters of the alphabet got their names | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
There seems to be little predictability to the English names for the letters of the alphabet, to say nothing of the names of letters in other languages. Some begin with an e-as-in-egg sound (eff, ell); some end in an ee sound (tee, dee); and others have no obvious rhyme or reason to them at all. How did they get that way?

 

Tags: language, culture, historical, English.


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Compare Countries With This Simple Tool

Compare Countries With This Simple Tool | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Drag and drop countries around the map to compare their relative size. Is Greenland really as big as all of Africa? You may be surprised at what you find! A great tool for educators.

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pdeppisch's comment, December 18, 2017 10:52 PM
Thank you. I always wanted a tool like this, :)