AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Gallery of Tombolos

Gallery of Tombolos | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Pictures of these rare sandbars that extend to a nearshore island.

 

Coastal physical geography produces beautiful landforms...these tombolos (some famous like Mont St. Michel) provide visual examples of numerous geomorphological processes. 


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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

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Allison Henley's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:35 PM

Very addicting even though I'm not that great at it!! haha

Matleena Laakso's curator insight, October 5, 2014 4:55 AM

Tämä on hauska, muutaman kerran on tullut "pelattua".

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:36 PM

Cool game that drops you down somewhere random in the world on street view, then asks you to guess where in the world you are

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This week on "Sunday Morning" (Jan. 14)

This week on "Sunday Morning" (Jan. 14) | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A look at the features for this week's broadcast of the Emmy Award-winning news program
Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's insight:
Mo Rocca's ability to explain government in his pieces is superb. This should be good!
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How the letters of the alphabet got their names

How the letters of the alphabet got their names | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
There seems to be little predictability to the English names for the letters of the alphabet, to say nothing of the names of letters in other languages. Some begin with an e-as-in-egg sound (eff, ell); some end in an ee sound (tee, dee); and others have no obvious rhyme or reason to them at all. How did they get that way?

 

Tags: language, culture, historical, English.


Via Seth Dixon, Scarpaci Human Geography
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Brexit, UK, Great Britain, and England

"An update of an earlier sketch we did before Brexit, the situation has become a little more unclear since."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 15, 2017 8:56 PM

The difference between the UK, Great Britain, and England can be confusing (the short version can be shown on a map, but the long version is much more complicated than this).   This is an amusing look at how these complexities lead to real-world complications besides using the right toponym. 

 

David G Tibbs's curator insight, January 18, 6:56 PM

Quick Rundown of Brexit

David G Tibbs's curator insight, January 18, 7:00 PM

Quick rundown of Brexit

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Don’t panic: Consumer debt boom is driven by rich borrowers, not the vulnerable poor 

Don’t panic: Consumer debt boom is driven by rich borrowers, not the vulnerable poor  | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The boom in consumer borrowing is driven by Britons with strong credit ratings, not the vulnerable borrowers who would worry regulators the most, Bank of England and Financial Conduct Authority researchers have found.

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English--History and Connotations

"What is the difference between 'a hearty welcome' and 'a cordial reception'? In a brief, action-packed history of the English language, Kate Gardoqui explains why these semantically equal phrases evoke such different images."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 7, 2017 2:42 PM

This TED-ED video (and lesson) shows how the connotations of English words often times depend on the linguistic root (sweat--Germanic, perspire--Latin). English has obviously changed much over the years, but this other TED-ED video (and lesson) also shows some good language family information and traces it back to proto-Indo-European roots.

    

Tags: languagecultureEnglishTED, video.

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Human Population Through Time

It took 200,000 years for our human population to reach 1 billion—and only 200 years to reach 7 billion. But growth has begun slowing, as women have fewe

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Why Z-lennials will upend Western brands' China strategy

Why Z-lennials will upend Western brands' China strategy | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Chinese Z-lennials are still young, and their lifestyle preference is significantly shaped by that of their parents as well as their environment ..."


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How the letters of the alphabet got their names

How the letters of the alphabet got their names | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
There seems to be little predictability to the English names for the letters of the alphabet, to say nothing of the names of letters in other languages. Some begin with an e-as-in-egg sound (eff, ell); some end in an ee sound (tee, dee); and others have no obvious rhyme or reason to them at all. How did they get that way?

 

Tags: language, culture, historical, English.


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Compare Countries With This Simple Tool

Compare Countries With This Simple Tool | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Drag and drop countries around the map to compare their relative size. Is Greenland really as big as all of Africa? You may be surprised at what you find! A great tool for educators.

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pdeppisch's comment, December 18, 2017 10:52 PM
Thank you. I always wanted a tool like this, :)
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An interview with two fathers channeling their grief into gun violence prevention

Watch the latest CBS Evening News Videos on CBSNews.com. View more videos on CBS News, featuring the latest in-depth coverage from our news team.
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The 10 Most Important Things to Know About Reflective Learning

The 10 Most Important Things to Know About Reflective Learning | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In this article we'll discuss the concept of what's called reflective learning. We'll look at some examples and applications and discover its importance.

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Chris Carter's curator insight, November 22, 2017 7:59 PM
A reflective learning primer on a page
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Blood Borders: A Proposal To Redraw A "New Middle East"

Blood Borders: A Proposal To Redraw A "New Middle East" | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The map above is a 2006 proposed plan to redrawn the borders of the Middle East by Ralph Peters a a retired United States Army lieutenant colonel.
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America is changing. Bigoted slurs, immigration bans and racist rallies can't change that

America is changing. Bigoted slurs, immigration bans and racist rallies can't change that | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Conceived by a band of wealthy, white men who demanded freedom, America has developed into a multicultural, multiethnic community. Here are some of the ways our nation has become -- and will continue to grow -- more diverse.
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We’re creating cow islands

We’re creating cow islands | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The parts of the United States that have higher populations of dairy cows are in the West and northern states.

 

Milk has moved away from cities between 2001 and 2011. Red areas indicate less milk in 2011 than 2001, green areas mean more and a buff color designates a neutral milk region.

Almost every region where you see a dark red area indicating a sharp decline in production has a large and growing population center nearby.


Via Seth Dixon, Scarpaci Human Geography
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 2, 2017 5:51 PM

As many of you will notice, this continues the reversal of some patterns that von Thünen observed and put in his famous agricultural model. 

 

Questions to Ponder: Why did milk used to need to be produced close to the cities?  Why is the old pattern changing now? How is this changing regions?

 

Tags: models, food production, agribusiness, agriculture.

ava smith's curator insight, January 8, 11:24 PM
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Welcome to the land that no country wants

Welcome to the land that no country wants | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Bir Tawil is the last truly unclaimed land on earth: a tiny sliver of Africa ruled by no state, inhabited by no permanent residents and governed by no laws.

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bridget rosolanka's curator insight, March 23, 2016 8:28 AM

Both Sudan and Egypt claim the rightful border between their countries should include the Hala'ib Triangle on their side of the border.  This leaves Bir Tawil unclaimed and it pops up in the news when those hoping to create a micronation claim it.  This bizarre case exemplifies some important principles of political geography with a tangible example to test the limits of political sovereignty and what it take to be called a country.  If discussing the elements necessary to create a state, this article would help fuel a discussion, especially when some people are eager to create their own micronation.    

 

Tags: political, states, unit 4 political.

Tracy Ross's curator insight, March 23, 2016 10:50 AM

Both Sudan and Egypt claim the rightful border between their countries should include the Hala'ib Triangle on their side of the border.  This leaves Bir Tawil unclaimed and it pops up in the news when those hoping to create a micronation claim it.  This bizarre case exemplifies some important principles of political geography with a tangible example to test the limits of political sovereignty and what it take to be called a country.  If discussing the elements necessary to create a state, this article would help fuel a discussion, especially when some people are eager to create their own micronation.    

 

Tags: political, states, unit 4 political.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 2016 12:57 PM

Both Sudan and Egypt claim the rightful border between their countries should include the Hala'ib Triangle on their side of the border.  This leaves Bir Tawil unclaimed and it pops up in the news when those hoping to create a micronation claim it.  This bizarre case exemplifies some important principles of political geography with a tangible example to test the limits of political sovereignty and what it take to be called a country.  If discussing the elements necessary to create a state, this article would help fuel a discussion, especially when some people are eager to create their own micronation.    

 

Tags: political, states, unit 4 political.

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Brexit, UK, Great Britain, and England

"An update of an earlier sketch we did before Brexit, the situation has become a little more unclear since."


Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 15, 2017 8:56 PM

The difference between the UK, Great Britain, and England can be confusing (the short version can be shown on a map, but the long version is much more complicated than this).   This is an amusing look at how these complexities lead to real-world complications besides using the right toponym. 

 

David G Tibbs's curator insight, January 18, 6:56 PM

Quick Rundown of Brexit

David G Tibbs's curator insight, January 18, 7:00 PM

Quick rundown of Brexit

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English--History and Connotations

"What is the difference between 'a hearty welcome' and 'a cordial reception'? In a brief, action-packed history of the English language, Kate Gardoqui explains why these semantically equal phrases evoke such different images."


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 7, 2017 2:42 PM

This TED-ED video (and lesson) shows how the connotations of English words often times depend on the linguistic root (sweat--Germanic, perspire--Latin). English has obviously changed much over the years, but this other TED-ED video (and lesson) also shows some good language family information and traces it back to proto-Indo-European roots.

    

Tags: languagecultureEnglishTED, video.

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The Real Threat to Hinduism: The Slow Death of India's Rivers

The Real Threat to Hinduism: The Slow Death of India's Rivers | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Hinduism shares an intricate, intimate relationship with the climate, geography, and biodiversity of South Asia; its festivals, deities, mythology, scriptures, calendar, rituals, and even superstitions are rooted in nature. There is a strong bond between Hinduism and South Asia’s forests, wildlife, rivers, seasons, mountains, soils, climate, and richly varied geography, which is manifest in the traditional layout of a typical Hindu household’s annual schedule. Hinduism’s existence is tied to all of these natural entities, and more prominently, to South Asia’s rivers.

 

Hinduism as a religion celebrates nature’s bounty, and what could be more representative of nature’s bounty than a river valley? South Asian rivers have sustained and nourished Hindu civilizations for centuries. They are responsible for our prosperous agriculture, timely monsoons, diverse aquatic ecosystems, riverine trade and commerce, and cultural richness.  Heavily dammed, drying in patches, infested by sand mafia and land grabbers, poisoned by untreated sewage and industrial waste, and hit by climate change — our rivers, the cradle of Hinduism, are in a sorry state.

 

If there is ever a threat to Hinduism, this is it. Destroy South Asia’s rivers and with it, Hinduism’s history and mythology will be destroyed. Rituals will turn into mockery, festivals, a farce, and Hinduism itself, a glaring example of man’s hypocritical relationship with nature. The fact that we worship our rivers as mothers and then choke them to death with all sorts of filth is already eminent.


Via Seth Dixon
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, January 4, 8:18 PM

The value of water 

Asia 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, January 4, 8:18 PM

Environmental change and human impacts 

Reasons for effective management 

Brian Weekley's comment, January 5, 9:26 AM
Seth- here is another article from a few years back about this same thing. http://www.newsweek.com/2015/10/02/ganges-river-dying-under-weight-modern-india-375347.html
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7 Billion: How Did We Get So Big So Fast? | SKUNK BEAR

http://skunkbear.tumblr.com It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improve

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Fun Facts, Weird Facts, Funny Facts, Interesting Facts - SoTrueFacts.comEnglish has only one word for 'love'. Sanskrit has 96.

Fun Facts, Weird Facts, Funny Facts, Interesting Facts - SoTrueFacts.comEnglish has only one word for 'love'. Sanskrit has 96. | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
English has only one word for 'love'. Sanskrit has 96.

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The History of Appalachian English: Why We Talk Differently | Appalachian Magazine

The History of Appalachian English: Why We Talk Differently | Appalachian Magazine | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Winning photos from National Geographic's Nature Photographer of the Year contest

Winning photos from National Geographic's Nature Photographer of the Year contest | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Selected from over 11,000 entries, National Geographic unveiled the most extraordinary wildlife, landscape, aerial and underwater photos of the year
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Geographic analysis for the zombie apocalypse

Can geography save your life in case of, say, a zombie apocalypse? Understanding the push and pull factors that create geographic movement -- or how people, resources, and even ideas travel -- might help you determine the location that's best for survival. David Hunter playfully analyzes the geography skills that you'd need to escape the zombies.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 24, 2017 3:48 PM

This tongue -in-cheek TED-ED lesson shows how the concepts of movement are spatial, and of course, critical in an zombie apocalypse.  Good vocabulary (push factors, pull factors, migration, infrastructure, etc.) is used in this clip.  

 

Tags: mobilitymigration, TED, video.

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Here’s What Your Part Of America Eats On Thanksgiving

Here’s What Your Part Of America Eats On Thanksgiving | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Thanksgiving — when we give thanks and celebrate a tale about the welcoming of foreign refugees to American shores — is once again upon us. For some, it’s a d…
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Gibraltar Bay

Gibraltar Bay | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Gibraltar Bay, located near the southernmost tip of the Iberian Peninsula, is the central feature of this astronaut photograph. The famous Rock of Gibraltar that forms the northeastern border of the bay is formed of Jurassic-era seafloor sediments that solidified into limestone, a rock formed mostly of the mineral calcite, which is found in the shells of sea creatures. The limestone was subsequently lifted above the ocean surface when the African and Eurasian tectonic plates collided."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 5, 2017 3:58 PM

Gibraltar is an exclave of the UK on a peninsula connected to the Spanish mainland that controls access to the Mediterranean Sea; there is naturally going to be friction over this unusual political configuration. "La Linea" marked on the image is the international border

 

Questions to Ponder: Why are both Spain and the UK invested in this piece of territory?  What challenges are there for a small exclave when neighbors aren't friendly?  How does Spanish and British supranational connections impact this issue?

 

Tags: borders, political, Spain, Europe.