AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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What on Earth Is Wrong With Connecticut?

What on Earth Is Wrong With Connecticut? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Conservatives say the state has a tax problem. Liberals say it has an inequality problem. What it really has is a city problem.

 

Connecticut is losing rich companies (and their tax revenues) while it’s adding low-wage workers, like personal-care aides and retail salespeople. Yet it remains a high-tax state. That’s a recipe for a budget crisis.

 

The rise and fall of Connecticut fits into the story of American cities. In the 1970s, American metros were suffering a terrible crime wave, and New York was dropping dead. That meant boom times for New York’s suburbs and southwestern Connecticut. But now many of those companies are moving back, lured by newly lower-crime cities and the hip urban neighborhoods where the most educated young workers increasingly want to live.

 

Finally, the hottest trend in American migration today is south, west, and cheap—that is, far away from Connecticut, both geographically and economically. Texas is growing rapidly, and seven of the 10 fastest-growing large metropolitan areas in 2016 were in the Carolinas and Florida. Of the 20 fastest-growing metros, none are in the northeast.

 

Tags: urban, regions, economic.


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Mr Mac's curator insight, August 8, 2017 4:58 PM
Unit 4 - Local Politics, Unit 6 - Economic Development, Unit 7 - Urban 
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Urban world: Meeting the demographic challenge in cities

Urban world: Meeting the demographic challenge in cities | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The days of easy growth in the world’s cities are over, and how they respond to demographic shifts will influence their prosperity.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 2017 3:54 PM

Some cities throughout Africa and Asia have experienced spectacular growth.  Europe, on the other isn't see the same level of growth and is even experiencing urban decline in a few regions. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What patterns do you see in these maps?  What cultural, demographic and economic factors explain some of the regional patterns in these maps?        

 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 13, 2017 11:00 AM
unit 7
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City lights quiz: can you identify these world cities from space?

City lights quiz: can you identify these world cities from space? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Astronauts on the International Space Station took these images of cities at night. Note that up doesn’t necessarily mean north. All images: ESA/NASA

Via Seth Dixon, Jane Ellingson
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 2017 3:25 PM

I'm a sucker for online quizzes like this.  Here is another quiz that shows only the grid outlines of particular cities.  This isn't just about knowing a city, but also identifying regional and urban patterns.  What are some other fun trivia quizzes?  GeoGuessr is one of the more addictive quizzes  where 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" are shown and you have to guess where.  Smarty Pins is a fun game on Google Maps that tests players' geography and trivia skills.  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few (this is one way to make the urban model more relevant).  If you want quizzes with more direct applicability in the classroom, click here for online regional quizzes.         

 

Tags: urbanmodelsfun, trivia.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, March 28, 2017 8:44 AM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends
Alexander peters's curator insight, April 11, 2017 9:07 AM
The article was about identifying city lights from the sky. I think that it was fun to do and guess them.
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The Staggering Wealth Of Mexico City

The Staggering Wealth Of Mexico City | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Walk on the streets and you´ll be exposed to its informal economy: people who do what they can to eke out a living including washing windshields, selling food, or even singing, dancing, and performing acrobatics for a tip.

What Americans may not know is that Mexico City is home to the wealthiest people, the poshest neighborhoods, the most exclusive shops, entertainment venues, and cultural centers on the planet.

Via Seth Dixon, Courtney Barrowman
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 1, 2016 12:57 PM

Mexico City has been the economic center of Mexico for a long time and is a true primate city. "Wealth accumulation in Mexico City has historically been concentrated in the hands of a few. In colonial times, the elite was mostly composed of Spanish-born immigrants who held high-ranking offices or worked as business owners or export-oriented merchants. Later, the wealthy were those who owned large estates known as haciendas…It is estimated that around 40 percent of Mexico’s income is owned by just 10 percent of its population, while 52.3 percent of Mexican citizens live in poverty."

 

Tags: urban, megacitieseconomic, labor, Mexico.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 30, 2016 8:13 PM

Contrasts found in large cities 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 22, 2017 11:08 AM
unit 6 and 7
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Mexico City, Parched and Sinking, Faces a Water Crisis

Mexico City, Parched and Sinking, Faces a Water Crisis | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A host of environmental factors are threatening to push a crowded capital toward a breaking point."


Via Seth Dixon, Jodi Esaili
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Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, February 8, 1:04 PM
(Mexico/Central America) Mexico city seems to be built in the worst way possible. The original Aztec architects could not imagine the locational problems the city faces today. Originally built on an island, Spanish conquerors drained the lakes and created an inland, mountainous position that causes the city to sink inches every year. Ironically, the city is now forced to use underground water sources or expensively import drinking water and poor locals can rarely count on tap water. The uneven clay and volcanic soil foundation and climate change further drives subsidence of this unplanned metropolis. Climate change will also create a series of floods and droughts and the inefficient sewage and water system will lead to devastation.
David G Tibbs's curator insight, February 8, 8:52 PM
This is a uniquely bad situation for Mexico city. Either they get to much rain and the city center sinks. If they don't get enough rain then the people are deprived of much-needed water. With the canal working at only 30 percent of its capacity coupled with the problems of transporting the water. With water being delivered between 2 to 7 weeks, coupled with people spending 10% of their finances on decent water. Also, how would an airport enhance the situation of the Mexican people? The money that is being spent on the airport should be spent on the infrastructure. 
 
brielle blais's curator insight, February 15, 2:20 PM
This article focuses on a lot of aspect of geography and Mexico Cities lack of water. To begin with, the physical traits of the land beneath the city is important to understand as it is porous, built on volcanic soil and clay, and the land is sinking at an incredible rate, multiple inches per year. Climate change in the area is also deeply affecting Mexico City, in two very different ways. There will either be absolutely no rainfall, only making the drought worse for the city, or there will be intense flooding. Both of which scream disaster for the city. 
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The Staggering Wealth Of Mexico City

The Staggering Wealth Of Mexico City | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Walk on the streets and you´ll be exposed to its informal economy: people who do what they can to eke out a living including washing windshields, selling food, or even singing, dancing, and performing acrobatics for a tip.

What Americans may not know is that Mexico City is home to the wealthiest people, the poshest neighborhoods, the most exclusive shops, entertainment venues, and cultural centers on the planet.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 1, 2016 12:57 PM

Mexico City has been the economic center of Mexico for a long time and is a true primate city. "Wealth accumulation in Mexico City has historically been concentrated in the hands of a few. In colonial times, the elite was mostly composed of Spanish-born immigrants who held high-ranking offices or worked as business owners or export-oriented merchants. Later, the wealthy were those who owned large estates known as haciendas…It is estimated that around 40 percent of Mexico’s income is owned by just 10 percent of its population, while 52.3 percent of Mexican citizens live in poverty."

 

Tags: urban, megacitieseconomic, labor, Mexico.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 30, 2016 8:13 PM

Contrasts found in large cities 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 22, 2017 11:08 AM
unit 6 and 7
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Aerial Photos Show how Apartheid Still Shapes South African Cities

Aerial Photos Show how Apartheid Still Shapes South African Cities | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
An American used drones to capture the color lines still stark in South African cities.

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Lee Hancock's curator insight, November 1, 2016 8:37 PM

Urban places and inequality. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 13, 2017 11:04 AM
unit 7
Mr Mac's curator insight, June 7, 2017 4:50 PM
Unit 4, 6, and 7 - Segregation, Development, and African cities. 
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The Subtle Design Features That Make Cities Feel More Hostile

The Subtle Design Features That Make Cities Feel More Hostile | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Think your city doesn’t like you? You’re right.

Via Seth Dixon, Jodi Esaili
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 2016 11:51 AM

Geography explores more than just what countries control a certain territory and what landforms are there.  Geography explores the spatial manifestations of power and how place is crafted to fit a particular vision.  Homeless people are essentially always 'out of place.'  These articles from the Society Pages, Atlas Obscura, the Atlantic and this one from the Guardian share similar things: that urban planners actively design places that will discourage loitering, skate boarding, and homelessness, which are all undesirable to local businesses.  This gallery shows various defensive architectural tactics to make certain people feel 'out of place.'  Just to show that not all urban designs are anti-homeless, this bench is one that is designed to help the homeless (and here is an ingenious plan to curb public urination).  

    

Tags: urbanplanning, architecture, landscape, place, poverty.

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London Should Secede From the United Kingdom

London Should Secede From the United Kingdom | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Beyond the stunning act that has become Britain’s vote to leave the European Union lies a deeper message: Democracy is not destiny, but devolution. Ceaseless entropy — the second law of thermodynamics — applies to politics as well. The more countries democratize, the more local populations seek greater self-rule.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 29, 2016 9:17 AM

In his book Connectography by Parag Khanna, he argues that connectivity and networks are more important today.  Using those ideas, Khanna discusses London's options after the recent Brexit vote in this op-ed (this additional article explores the demographic divide on the Brexit vote, especially how many British Millennials feel that their future has been snatched from them).      

Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, January 18, 7:40 PM

In this article, Parag Khanna argues exactly what the title suggests, "London should secede from the United Kingdom". In light of the UK's decision to leave the European Union, Khanna discusses that "Londoners... voted by a wide majority to 'remain' in the EU" and suggests that many Londoners have lost their sense of British Pride after the secession. Though it is mentioned that the city "can't and won't" leave the country, the exit from the EU directly impacts London's economy because "immigrants are essential for the city’s financial and education sectors". Without the immigrants, the city's finances will not only be in jeopardy, but its connection between foreign places will be impacted as well. 

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Superblocks to the rescue: Barcelona’s plan to give streets back to residents

Superblocks to the rescue: Barcelona’s plan to give streets back to residents | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The Catalan capital’s radical new strategy will restrict traffic to a number of big roads, drastically reducing pollution and turning secondary streets into ‘citizen spaces’ for culture, leisure and the community.  Black routes allow public transport and cars at 50km/h, while green routes only allow private vehicles at 10km/h to prioritize pedestrians and cycling."

 

Tags: Catalonia, Spain, mobility, transportation, place, neighborhood, urban, planning, urbanism.


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From megacity to metacity

From megacity to metacity | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

In 1950, there were only two megacities, London and New York, with populations of more than 10m. In 2010, Tokyo was top of the list of the world’s largest cities, New York was only just scraping into the top 10, and London had dropped off the bottom. New York will join it in megacity oblivion in less than a decade and, with the exception of Tokyo, every other megacity will be in what is referred to as the 'global south'. To earn a place in the top 10, cities will soon need to boast a population of 20m or more. This is a new breed of city – the metacity."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 12, 2016 2:24 PM

The term megacity (a city with a population greater than 10 million) has been around for a while and there wasn't much linguistic need to describe something bigger.  Today, most megacities are more like Lagos and Mumbai, places of extreme wealth asymmetries than the global cities of New York City and London.  Some are now using the term metacity to describe cities with populations of 20 million.  Asian metacities are a good place to start thinking about the largest urban regions that are increasingly dominating economic, political and cultural affairs.      

 

Tags: urbanmegacities, unit 7 citiesEast Asia.

Linda White's curator insight, May 13, 2016 12:13 PM
Very interesting article on the new emerging meta cities!
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These cities will be very rich in 10 years

These cities will be very rich in 10 years | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Forget New York, London or Hong Kong. Here are seven cities that are racing up the rankings of the world's richest, and will be among the top 10 by 2025, according to researchers from McKinsey.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 29, 2016 9:38 AM
  1. Doha, Qatar
  2. Bergen, Norway
  3. Trondheim, Norway
  4. Hwaseong, South Korea
  5. Asan, South Korea
  6. Rhine Ruhr, Germany
  7. Macau, China

Tagsurbandevelopment, economic, planninglaborglobalization, technology.   

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, January 18, 7:15 PM

This article was very interesting as none of the cities on this list were in the United States, or even North America.  Right now, most would consider the United States to be the wealthiest nation.  The fact that none of the major cities in the U.S. make the list leads me to believe that the U.S.'s economy is not growing at the rate of other countries.  Another part of this list that was interesting was that 2 out of 7 of the cities predicted to gain wealth were in Norway and 2 others were in South Korea.  Perhaps this means that these countries will enjoy the most economic power in the coming years.  A majority of the cities on this list are involved with the technology industry, versus only a few involved in the energy industry.  This shows a shift in the markets that dominate the global economy presently and how they will continue to grow in the future.  According to this list the global economy will change not only which countries have the most economic power, but also which industries are going to the largest.

Richard Aitchison's curator insight, January 18, 7:16 PM

Many of the same cities for years have dominated or as we think of them as the "rich and powerful" cities of the world. The first cities that pop into my head are of course New York City, London, Paris, and Munich just to name a few. However, this article looks into the future and the ever changing landscape of the world that we live in. We would think it would take tens or hundreds of years to change, but in the last 10 years alone technology has changed so much so why can't cities? The cities listed in the article such as Qatar which was number one on the list and is hosting the World Cup in 2020 is looking for a major boom from that event. Two South Korean cities are also listed in the top 7 as China continues to boom and they are geographically close to it they have seen a boom from being a port city.  All 7 cities are interesting in that they are not cities that just rang off the top and this article help dig deep into not just which cities, but why and how. Interesting and fun read. 

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A New Map for America

A New Map for America | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The 50-state model is holding the country back. It needs a new system, built around urban corridors.

Via Seth Dixon, LEONARDO WILD
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Jean-Simon Venne's curator insight, April 28, 2016 8:13 AM
We should build a similar map for technology innovaton
Character Minutes's curator insight, July 1, 2016 7:13 PM
Great way to encourage critical thinking in students: what would this impact? Adv & Disadvantages? Compare 50 states vs this model? How would new plan be implemented? 

Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 30, 2016 2:26 PM
...and back to city states?
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Sprawling Shanghai

Sprawling Shanghai | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
If you could go back in time to the 1980s, you would find a city that is drastically different than today’s Shanghai.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 20, 2017 5:20 PM

This series of seven satellite images shows how quickly the economic development of China has impacted the urban sprawl of China's biggest cities.  Pictures of the downtown area's growth are impressive, but these aerial images show the full magnitude of the change. 

 

Tags: urbanremote sensing, megacities, China, urban ecology.

Mr Mac's curator insight, June 13, 2017 10:17 AM
Unit 7 - Urban Sprawl 
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City lights quiz: can you identify these world cities from space?

City lights quiz: can you identify these world cities from space? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Astronauts on the International Space Station took these images of cities at night. Note that up doesn’t necessarily mean north. All images: ESA/NASA

Via Seth Dixon, LEONARDO WILD
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 2017 3:25 PM

I'm a sucker for online quizzes like this.  Here is another quiz that shows only the grid outlines of particular cities.  This isn't just about knowing a city, but also identifying regional and urban patterns.  What are some other fun trivia quizzes?  GeoGuessr is one of the more addictive quizzes  where 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" are shown and you have to guess where.  Smarty Pins is a fun game on Google Maps that tests players' geography and trivia skills.  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few (this is one way to make the urban model more relevant).  If you want quizzes with more direct applicability in the classroom, click here for online regional quizzes.         

 

Tags: urbanmodelsfun, trivia.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, March 28, 2017 8:44 AM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends
Alexander peters's curator insight, April 11, 2017 9:07 AM
The article was about identifying city lights from the sky. I think that it was fun to do and guess them.
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Battle Cry for the Bodega

Battle Cry for the Bodega | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Why the chainification of the corner store is a bigger deal than losing book stores and record stores combined.

 

The term Bodega originally referred to a neighborhood grocery in a mostly Spanish-speaking part of town, it has come to be used (in my experience) to cover just about any independently owned small grocer in the city. The fear is that the corporate behemoth (7-Eleven) will destroy the neighborhood bodega, a New York institution of long standing. The quintessential bodega is a beloved part of the fabric of the city.  The outcry has been loudest in the East Village, a neighborhood that despite gentrification still prides itself on its countercultural attitude and grimy authenticity.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 22, 2017 8:22 PM

When we discuss food deserts, we typically think about places that lack supermarkets.  In an urban context, the places that often fill this void are the bodegas.  In some major cities, these are going away as chains like 7-Eleven want to expand their reach and squeeze out these independent grocers. However you view this issue, “There’s no denying that the texture of the city would be flattened if the idiosyncratic bodega became an endangered species.”

 

Tags: food, urban, povertyplace, socioeconomic, food desert.

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Mexico City, Parched and Sinking, Faces a Water Crisis

Mexico City, Parched and Sinking, Faces a Water Crisis | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A host of environmental factors are threatening to push a crowded capital toward a breaking point."


Via Seth Dixon, geographil
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Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, February 8, 1:04 PM
(Mexico/Central America) Mexico city seems to be built in the worst way possible. The original Aztec architects could not imagine the locational problems the city faces today. Originally built on an island, Spanish conquerors drained the lakes and created an inland, mountainous position that causes the city to sink inches every year. Ironically, the city is now forced to use underground water sources or expensively import drinking water and poor locals can rarely count on tap water. The uneven clay and volcanic soil foundation and climate change further drives subsidence of this unplanned metropolis. Climate change will also create a series of floods and droughts and the inefficient sewage and water system will lead to devastation.
David G Tibbs's curator insight, February 8, 8:52 PM
This is a uniquely bad situation for Mexico city. Either they get to much rain and the city center sinks. If they don't get enough rain then the people are deprived of much-needed water. With the canal working at only 30 percent of its capacity coupled with the problems of transporting the water. With water being delivered between 2 to 7 weeks, coupled with people spending 10% of their finances on decent water. Also, how would an airport enhance the situation of the Mexican people? The money that is being spent on the airport should be spent on the infrastructure. 
 
brielle blais's curator insight, February 15, 2:20 PM
This article focuses on a lot of aspect of geography and Mexico Cities lack of water. To begin with, the physical traits of the land beneath the city is important to understand as it is porous, built on volcanic soil and clay, and the land is sinking at an incredible rate, multiple inches per year. Climate change in the area is also deeply affecting Mexico City, in two very different ways. There will either be absolutely no rainfall, only making the drought worse for the city, or there will be intense flooding. Both of which scream disaster for the city. 
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Quiz: identify the cities from their running heatmaps

Quiz: identify the cities from their running heatmaps | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Smartphones and GPS watches now leave digital traces behind many urban runners, as they wind their way along the river or round the park. Can you identify the cities from the telltale tracks?

Via Seth Dixon, Jodi Esaili
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 2017 1:12 PM

Last year, my running program was greatly enhanced by using a mapping app(I know, who could have guessed that Map My Run and Strava would help keep me motivated and inspired?).  More runners are naturally going to be on more important roads, but they also love beautiful parks and runs along the water.  With that in mind, can you identify these ten cities from around the world based on the density of running routes?  You can explore your city's raw data on Strava

 

Tags: urbanmodelsfun, trivia.

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Here Are the Real Boundaries of American Metropolises, Decided by an Algorithm

Here Are the Real Boundaries of American Metropolises, Decided by an Algorithm | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
How is the U.S. actually split geographically?

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Superblocks to the rescue: Barcelona’s plan to give streets back to residents

Superblocks to the rescue: Barcelona’s plan to give streets back to residents | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The Catalan capital’s radical new strategy will restrict traffic to a number of big roads, drastically reducing pollution and turning secondary streets into ‘citizen spaces’ for culture, leisure and the community.  Black routes allow public transport and cars at 50km/h, while green routes only allow private vehicles at 10km/h to prioritize pedestrians and cycling."

 

Tags: Catalonia, Spain, mobility, transportation, place, neighborhood, urban, planning, urbanism.


Via Seth Dixon, Scarpaci Human Geography
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Crafting a Sense of Place

Crafting a Sense of Place | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Talk about creating a sense of place! This neighborhood in #Covington draws on German roots to create a restaurant/pub district. Even the non-German restaurants in the area evoke an old world cultural landscape aesthetic in a way that makes the neighborhood appealing to visitors and prospective residents. #culturallandscape #placemaking."

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 31, 2016 10:45 PM

I love exploring the cultural landscapes in and around Cincinnati every year during the #APHGreading.   

 

Tags: neighborhoodlandscapeurban, place, social media, APHG, Cincinnati

 

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Crafting a Sense of Place

Crafting a Sense of Place | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Talk about creating a sense of place! This neighborhood in #Covington draws on German roots to create a restaurant/pub district. Even the non-German restaurants in the area evoke an old world cultural landscape aesthetic in a way that makes the neighborhood appealing to visitors and prospective residents. #culturallandscape #placemaking."

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 31, 2016 10:45 PM

I love exploring the cultural landscapes in and around Cincinnati every year during the #APHGreading.   

 

Tags: neighborhoodlandscapeurban, place, social media, APHG, Cincinnati

 

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Beyond debt default and Zika, Puerto Rico struggles as trash piles up

As Puerto Rico’s government grapples with an economic crisis, a Zika outbreak, and widespread landfill closures, another disaster is brewing -- trash on the island. Whenever it rains, several feet of black, contaminated water and trash flood the homes of people living near the Martín Peña Channel.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 15, 2016 3:14 PM

This video clip really stretches across diverse geographic strands...If you are looking for a "post-test," end-of-the-year resource to help them tie together loose strands of the curriculum, this could certainly be of use.

 

Tags: urbanwatermedical, environmentpollution, urban ecology, Puerto Rico, economic.

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These cities will be very rich in 10 years

These cities will be very rich in 10 years | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Forget New York, London or Hong Kong. Here are seven cities that are racing up the rankings of the world's richest, and will be among the top 10 by 2025, according to researchers from McKinsey.

Via Seth Dixon, Dustin Fowler
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 29, 2016 9:38 AM
  1. Doha, Qatar
  2. Bergen, Norway
  3. Trondheim, Norway
  4. Hwaseong, South Korea
  5. Asan, South Korea
  6. Rhine Ruhr, Germany
  7. Macau, China

Tagsurbandevelopment, economic, planninglaborglobalization, technology.   

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, January 18, 7:15 PM

This article was very interesting as none of the cities on this list were in the United States, or even North America.  Right now, most would consider the United States to be the wealthiest nation.  The fact that none of the major cities in the U.S. make the list leads me to believe that the U.S.'s economy is not growing at the rate of other countries.  Another part of this list that was interesting was that 2 out of 7 of the cities predicted to gain wealth were in Norway and 2 others were in South Korea.  Perhaps this means that these countries will enjoy the most economic power in the coming years.  A majority of the cities on this list are involved with the technology industry, versus only a few involved in the energy industry.  This shows a shift in the markets that dominate the global economy presently and how they will continue to grow in the future.  According to this list the global economy will change not only which countries have the most economic power, but also which industries are going to the largest.

Richard Aitchison's curator insight, January 18, 7:16 PM

Many of the same cities for years have dominated or as we think of them as the "rich and powerful" cities of the world. The first cities that pop into my head are of course New York City, London, Paris, and Munich just to name a few. However, this article looks into the future and the ever changing landscape of the world that we live in. We would think it would take tens or hundreds of years to change, but in the last 10 years alone technology has changed so much so why can't cities? The cities listed in the article such as Qatar which was number one on the list and is hosting the World Cup in 2020 is looking for a major boom from that event. Two South Korean cities are also listed in the top 7 as China continues to boom and they are geographically close to it they have seen a boom from being a port city.  All 7 cities are interesting in that they are not cities that just rang off the top and this article help dig deep into not just which cities, but why and how. Interesting and fun read. 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
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These cities will be very rich in 10 years

These cities will be very rich in 10 years | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Forget New York, London or Hong Kong. Here are seven cities that are racing up the rankings of the world's richest, and will be among the top 10 by 2025, according to researchers from McKinsey.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 29, 2016 9:38 AM
  1. Doha, Qatar
  2. Bergen, Norway
  3. Trondheim, Norway
  4. Hwaseong, South Korea
  5. Asan, South Korea
  6. Rhine Ruhr, Germany
  7. Macau, China

Tagsurbandevelopment, economic, planninglaborglobalization, technology.   

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, January 18, 7:15 PM

This article was very interesting as none of the cities on this list were in the United States, or even North America.  Right now, most would consider the United States to be the wealthiest nation.  The fact that none of the major cities in the U.S. make the list leads me to believe that the U.S.'s economy is not growing at the rate of other countries.  Another part of this list that was interesting was that 2 out of 7 of the cities predicted to gain wealth were in Norway and 2 others were in South Korea.  Perhaps this means that these countries will enjoy the most economic power in the coming years.  A majority of the cities on this list are involved with the technology industry, versus only a few involved in the energy industry.  This shows a shift in the markets that dominate the global economy presently and how they will continue to grow in the future.  According to this list the global economy will change not only which countries have the most economic power, but also which industries are going to the largest.

Richard Aitchison's curator insight, January 18, 7:16 PM

Many of the same cities for years have dominated or as we think of them as the "rich and powerful" cities of the world. The first cities that pop into my head are of course New York City, London, Paris, and Munich just to name a few. However, this article looks into the future and the ever changing landscape of the world that we live in. We would think it would take tens or hundreds of years to change, but in the last 10 years alone technology has changed so much so why can't cities? The cities listed in the article such as Qatar which was number one on the list and is hosting the World Cup in 2020 is looking for a major boom from that event. Two South Korean cities are also listed in the top 7 as China continues to boom and they are geographically close to it they have seen a boom from being a port city.  All 7 cities are interesting in that they are not cities that just rang off the top and this article help dig deep into not just which cities, but why and how. Interesting and fun read.