AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Colombia rejects FARC deal: What's next?

Colombia rejects FARC deal: What's next? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A narrow win for Colombia's opponents to a government peace deal with FARC rebels has thrown the country into disarray, leading one journalist to starkly declare, 'Nobody really knows what will happen tomorrow.'  Likened to the fallout from the United Kingdom's 'Brexit' referendum, the vote's unexpected failure has left the Colombian political classes reeling and unsure how to respond in order to save four years of hard negotiation with the Marxist militia."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 4, 2016 4:31 PM

The Colombian peace negotiations with FARC (the insurgent rebels in drug producing regions) were hailed as the key for Colombia to move past it's violent, drug-cartel past and move into the future.  As the Colombian population rejected the deal by the slimmest of margins (50.22% against), it leaves the government "without a Plan B." There are more questions than answers at this point about what might happen (if you are asking what's FARC?, then this primer will walk you through it). 

 

TagsSouth America, Colombiapoliticalnarcotics, conflict.

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, February 14, 7:43 PM
This article highlights the amount of division that is occurring within Colombia.  The country is divided in two ways.  Those who are supporters and members of FARC who believe communism is how Colombia should be governed are in conflict with the rest of the population who want to maintain their democratic ways.  Even among the majority of Colombians who are not associated with FARC, making peace with them is a point of division.  A nationwide vote very narrowly rejected a deal that would make peace with FARC.  Those who voted no do not want to forgive FARC for the crimes they have committed and feel the only way to make peace is to lock up those in FARC.  The rest of the country, including the Colombian president simply wanted to establish peace in Colombia.  The country was unsure what would happen going forward when this article was written.  This example of Colombian conflict shows the effects of globalization.  FARC was inspired by the vision of communism that Lenin had back in the early 1900s and is still effecting a country far from Russia one hundred years later.  As the world became more connected, so too were ideas able to spread and take hold in regions far from their origins.  Another big source of conflict involving FARC is the drug trade, which was only made possible by the consumption and demand of Americans.  Many of the problems facing the world today are often very complex and involve exterior forces, much like the dilemma in Colombia.
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Will American Pot Farmers Put the Cartels out of Business?

Will American Pot Farmers Put the Cartels out of Business? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
They've driven prices so low that Mexican growers are giving up.

 

For the first time ever, many of the farmers who supply Mexican drug cartels have stopped planting marijuana, reports the Washington Post. "It's not worth it anymore," said Rodrigo Silla, a lifelong cannabis farmer from central Mexico. "I wish the Americans would stop with this legalization."  Facing stiff competition from pot grown legally and illegally north of the border, the price for a kilogram of Mexican schwag has plummeted by 75 percent, from $100 to $25.


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:37 AM

there is also a negative side affect on this and that is now that planting marijuana is not making any money for the growers it is time to move to bigger and more dangerous stuff. The united states though the government  will not admit to, has a major drug usage problem and so it would be time to bring in another form of drug to make a profit. every so often there is something new that pops up on the streets and Americans want to experience them.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:51 PM

Events that we think of as local (Washington and Colorado legalizing marijuana use) have national and global implications, especially in a globalized economy.  This article is but one example of why geographers try to approach every issue at a variety of scales to more fully comprehend the ramifications and ripple effects of any given phenomenon. 

 

Tags: Mexiconarcoticsscale

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 9, 2017 12:06 PM
unit 4 unit 5
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Crack Shack or Mansion?

Crack Shack or Mansion? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Can you tell a Vancouver mansion from a crack shack?

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 4:31 PM


In this world any house can be held as a drug location. in the neighbor I live there was a house that broken into by the cops in which they found hundreds of pounds of drugs and none of the neighbors knew. We thought it was an abandoned home. a crack shack or mansion it is difficult to determine if it is or not.

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:58 AM

This I found to be very interesting. To me it was very sterotypical and much harder than I thought it would be. I figured it would be easy to depict a Mansion from a Crack Shack, but I guess I was wrong. Different areas different lifestyles.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 25, 2014 9:55 AM

A fairly funny game that makes fun of the astronomical real estate prices in Vancouver, BC. I actually wasn't incredibly surprised as I've watched some HGTV. Since many of the shows are Canadian imports the extremely high priced homes in Vancouver and Toronto are often featured.

 

I guessed 10/16. The game should branch out to Toronto, we might've caught a glimpse of Rob Ford.

 

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Legalized Marijuana in the USA

Legalized Marijuana in the USA | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Washington state has become the first in America to allow the recreational use of cannabis, setting up a potential showdown with the US federal government.

 

The states that have legalized recreational marijuana use reflect regional differences in cultural and communal values within the United States.  This is quite a quandry with fascinating ramifications as popular cultural values clash with political tradition. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What will the Federal government do considering that a state law is contradicting a federal law?  Will other states follow?  Would a California employee fail a drug test is the drugs were legally consumed in a different state?  Will Washington and Colorado receive more weekend tourism?   


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Wikinarco: mapping narcoviolence

Wikinarco: mapping narcoviolence | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
RT @WomanVote: Wikinarco: mapping narcoviolence – Boing Boing http://t.co/OtsB8wni #Mexico #NarcoWar #violence...

 

The drug violence in Mexico has been a huge problem recently, but technology is allowing citizens new ways to combat the problem in the absence of effective governance. 

 


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FARC-Colombia peace deal finalized

FARC-Colombia peace deal finalized | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Negotiators seeking to end the insurgency in Colombia, one of the world's longest-running conflicts, said they had reached a final peace deal.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 27, 2016 11:23 AM

Farclandia has long been an insurgent state where the Colombian government had no real power to enforce the rule of law and their sovereignty over this area that all the political maps say are Colombia.   This shadowy place became a place where drug cartels could operate freely and many of the concessions that Colombia is making for this deal to happen involve amnesty for past crimes. 

 

TagsSouth America, Colombiapoliticalnarcotics. conflict.

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Shifting sands: Changing Geography of the Mexican Drug War

Shifting sands: Changing Geography of the Mexican Drug War | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

FIVE years ago next week, Felipe Calderón took office as Mexico’s president and launched a crackdown against organised crime.

 

While the rates of murders are plateauing at 12,000 per year, internally where are these murders taking place?  Which places are becoming more critical to control?  Murders are shifting east (From Sinaloa and Chihuahua to Nuevo Leon and Veracruz).  Why is this shift occurring?  What does this shift indicate politically and economically for Mexico?


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, September 29, 2013 1:27 PM

These numbers are astonishing especially when based simply on drugs, money, and power.  Compared to the article where it described Tijuana as still being one of the major cities for murder, the numbers and color scheme seem to show the region as one of the areas with less murders.  Heading south into the country, is Mexico City.  The city which is surrounded by such a large metropolitan area with a vast gap between poor and rich tends to have low murder rates.  This is very interesting considering popular belief tends to focus on such violence being conducted in large cities where there is better chance of cartels using the neighborhoods and people within them to strengthen their empire.  This makes me wonder if the authorities are too strong for cartels to infiltrate and become powerful, or on a limb, do the cartels have a mutual agreement not to do business in the country's economical and cultural hub?

Julia & Eva's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:34 PM

This artilce falls under the category of political. It shows that Mexico's continuing drug war has effected the people that live there with lots of violence. By getting a new president, their murder rates have gone down, which has had a significant benefit on their country.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 3, 2014 1:20 PM

In Mexico there is a long standing tradition of the cartels working with officials to make sure their drug operation remain intact. With opportunities at a minimum in these rural areas where drug lords exist, the drug business provides youths with an opportunity they would otherwise not have. In Mexico the informal economy keeps many of these states in business. This shift is only evidence of where police are cracking down and where disputed territories exist. Cartels that have a stronghold over a territory with police cooperation don't need to increase their causality rate to maintain order.

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A quieter drug war in Mexico, but no less deadly

A quieter drug war in Mexico, but no less deadly | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Months have gone by since the last of the grisly mass killings that have marked the conflict’s darkest moments.

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Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 2015 2:45 PM

Looks like President Enrique Nieto has shifted tactics in Mexico's fight against the drug trade. When he won election from Felipe Calderon he changed the way he portrayed his country. No more would he parade alleged drug dealers and overlords before they went to trial. This would only infuriate the drug lords and they sought revenge by seeking out police to either kill, or bribe, further deteriorating the uneasy truce between the government and the drug trade. By keeping this off the news and promoting Mexico's other needs such as trade, education reform, and reduction of poverty.

The mass killings have been kept mostly out of the spotlight and the body count is still the same, but Nieto can now fight this fight largely out of the public's eye. The drug related killings have moved to the northern territories away from cameras and the public. This should afford him opportunity to focus on this problem and keep the public from thinking Armageddon is around the corner.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, September 29, 2015 2:38 PM

Mexico is a country that is still dealing with gangs and violence throughout the entire country. Gangs from Los Zetas to Los Sinaloas are constantly search of more power and reign over territories in Mexico. This article simply describes that the efforts against violence and drugs have not been resolved in the country, but it has got "quieter" in regards of violence against military or police officials. Between 2007 to 2012 attacks on military officials increased but recently they have been diminishing. The gangs have realized that having a war against military officials only brings more attention to them. The gangs are still fighting each other, but are not bombing or having urban gun battles in the middle of 'loud' cities. 

Big boarder cities like Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez murder rate has dropped 80% since 2010. The question is, where are is the violence and attacks of cartel vs. cartel taking place? The area of battle is now in Torreon. This city of manufacturing, mining, and farming, is now one of the most dangerous cities in Mexico due to gang violence. It makes sense to draw attention to a city where industries are important. Another reason for the battles is because its the area between Los Zetas and Los Sinoloas territory. 

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, October 7, 2015 1:34 PM

It is interesting to know that the drug cartel violent s has slowly been decreasing from public views. Violence from the war on drugs on the Mexico border with the United States has been a huge issue for a while post 9/11. They are finally trying to avoid conflicts with the government, specifically the military and police  because it will only bring more pressure to them. It is a smart thing to keep violence of the streets but out in places where there the cartels can draw less attention, murders and trafficking still exist. It is important to understand that a huge problem like this does not just vanished completely, but changes overtime and shift to other quiet places.  

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Legalized Marijuana in the USA

Legalized Marijuana in the USA | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Washington state has become the first in America to allow the recreational use of cannabis, setting up a potential showdown with the US federal government.


The states that have legalized recreational marijuana use reflect regional differences in cultural and communal values within the United States.  This is quite a quandry with fascinating ramifications as popular cultural values clash with political tradition. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What will the Federal government do considering that a state law is contradicting a federal law?  Will other states follow?  Would a California employee fail a drug test is the drugs were legally consumed in a different state?  Will Washington and Colorado receive more weekend tourism?   


Via Seth Dixon
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