AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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How the letters of the alphabet got their names

How the letters of the alphabet got their names | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
There seems to be little predictability to the English names for the letters of the alphabet, to say nothing of the names of letters in other languages. Some begin with an e-as-in-egg sound (eff, ell); some end in an ee sound (tee, dee); and others have no obvious rhyme or reason to them at all. How did they get that way?

 

Tags: language, culture, historical, English.


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English--History and Connotations

"What is the difference between 'a hearty welcome' and 'a cordial reception'? In a brief, action-packed history of the English language, Kate Gardoqui explains why these semantically equal phrases evoke such different images."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 7, 2017 2:42 PM

This TED-ED video (and lesson) shows how the connotations of English words often times depend on the linguistic root (sweat--Germanic, perspire--Latin). English has obviously changed much over the years, but this other TED-ED video (and lesson) also shows some good language family information and traces it back to proto-Indo-European roots.

    

Tags: languagecultureEnglishTED, video.

Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 1:19 PM
It is very interesting to see how far the English language has come and how much is has changed over the past 1600 years. Adding to that it is intriguing to see what other languages had an influence on English. I knew that German and English were very similar languages which made sense that German had a large influence on the English language. Although, it did take me by surprise that French has made quite an impact on English as well. Also, that royal Englishmen spoke French for three centuries. That piece of information shocked me since France and England have had such a historic rivalry that lasted for centuries. Overall, I enjoyed this video and the border maps helped me to better understand the evolution of the English language.
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The History of Appalachian English: Why We Talk Differently | Appalachian Magazine

The History of Appalachian English: Why We Talk Differently | Appalachian Magazine | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, December 31, 2017 5:54 PM
Unit 3 Language 
Laurie Ruggiero's curator insight, May 29, 4:09 PM
Unit 3
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Quebec urges shopkeepers to stop saying 'Hi'

Quebec urges shopkeepers to stop saying 'Hi' | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

The unofficial greeting in the bilingual Canadian city of Montreal has long been a friendly 'Bonjour, Hi!' But that standard is no more since a motion mandating store clerks to greet customers only in French was passed in Quebec's provincial legislature. The move reaffirms French as the primary language in the province, where use of English can be controversial. The motion - which is not a law - was passed unanimously, but the province's premier called the debate 'ridiculous'. Introduced by the fiercely Francophile Parti Quebecois, the motion 'invites all businesses and workers who enter into contact with local and international clients to welcome them warmly with the word bonjour'."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 1, 2017 8:26 PM

This is a great example of how culture isn't just passively received, but it's actively constructed.  The call to defend cultural traits of a region to maintain it's local distinctiveness is oftentimes why a region has a strong sense of place.  

 

TagsCanadalanguage, placeculture, landscape

Matt Richardson's curator insight, January 3, 2:24 PM
The actions of the Quebecois legislature to regulate free speech is a form of hierarchical diffusion. Here is a [slightly dated but good] video explaining the modern complexity of the French/English divide in Canada, especially as it relates to new immigrants.
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Why Don’t We All Speak the Same Language?

Why Don’t We All Speak the Same Language? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
There are 7,000 languages spoken on Earth. What are the costs — and benefits — of our modern-day Tower of Babel?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 21, 2017 10:40 AM

These two podcasts are great mainstream looks at issues that filled with cultural geography content.  So many languages on Earth is clearly inefficient (the EU spends $1 billion per year on translation), and yet, linguistic diversity is such a rich part of humanity's cultural heritage.  Listen to the first episode, Why Don't We All Speak the Same Language? as well as the follow-up episode, What Would Be the Best Universal Language?

 

Tags: languagecultureworldwide, English, regions, diffusiontechnology.

Andrew Kahn's curator insight, November 4, 2017 8:13 PM
Culture speaks louder than words
 
Laurie Ruggiero's curator insight, May 29, 4:48 PM
Unit 3
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The languages the world is trying to learn, according to Duolingo

The languages the world is trying to learn, according to Duolingo | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

If you own a smartphone and are trying to learn a language, you probably have Duolingo. English is far and away the most dominant, with a caveat: For some learners, English is the only language Duolingo offers with translation into their native tongue. That doesn’t change the fact of universal interest in English, though, which Duolingo notes is studied by 53% of its users. Things get more interesting when you look at the second-most popular language by country. There French takes the lead, followed by Spanish, German, and Portuguese.

 

Tags: language, colonialism, technology, diffusion, culture, English.


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Madison Murphy's curator insight, March 13, 2017 3:15 PM
This article "The Languages The World Is Trying To Learn, According To Duolingo" relates to language in Human Geography because it is an app that describes how languages are being spread but also how countries are picking a certain language to be able to communicate with, which is English.  Countries are picking English because they are needing a language to be able to communicate with other countries.
Hailey Austin's curator insight, March 13, 2017 8:45 PM
This reflects to what we are learning in  class because  the articles talking about language. It's talking about how we all really have one language in come in all around the world. I think this is a good idea to have when your working with other countries or you are visiting them.
Hailey Austin's curator insight, April 6, 2017 3:09 PM
This relates to my class because its talking about religion. It states that in many different parts in the world it is very dominate  to learn English. But whats more interesting is that French is right after us. It talks about why English is so popular. Which is because its a language you can use when you visit places and you will be able to communicate. I think this article is interesting  because it is talking about how we are the most popular language but its one of the most complicated one to learn. I also would understand why English is most learned because a lot of people want to visit Florida or even move their.
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Easiest Languages to Learn

"Learning another language is a good thing, but with only a small percentage of Americans, it seems most of us can never dream of achieving this common goal."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 6, 2016 4:49 PM

This video's humor isn't always classroom appropriate, but it conveys several important ideas about languages.  First, languages that are part of the same language family are easier to learn (leading to more cultural diffusion among speakers).  Second, not all languages are equally important on a global scale even if they are similar (some languages are 'docked' on this list). This list is specifically for English speakers: 

  1. Dutch
  2. Frisian
  3. Afrikaans
  4. Esperanto
  5. Norwegian
  6. Swedish
  7. Italian
  8. French
  9. Portuguese
  10. Spanish

 

Tags: language, culture, diffusion.

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Reading the world in 196 books

Reading the world in 196 books | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"I set myself the challenge of trying to read a book from every country (well, all 195 UN-recognised states plus former UN member Taiwan) in a year to find out what I was missing.

With no idea how to go about this beyond a sneaking suspicion that I was unlikely to find publications from nearly 200 nations on the shelves of my local bookshop, I decided to ask the planet’s readers for help. I created a blog called A Year of Reading the World and put out an appeal for suggestions of titles that I could read in English."

 

Tags: language, culture, worldwide, English.


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The world’s most spoken languages

The world’s most spoken languages | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 17, 2016 11:31 AM

This infographic is a great way to visualize the dominant languages on Earth.  Since this only counts one language per person, mother tongues are listed.  Consequently, lingua franca's such as English and France are smaller than you might have presumed them to be.  

 

Tags: language, culture, infographic.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, October 8, 2016 2:39 AM
The world’s most spoken languages
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How Did Latin Become A Dead Language?

How Science Is Keeping Latin Alive https://youtu.be/qT4XWxlnYdU Subscribe! http://bitly.com/1iLOHml While Latin's influence is apparent in many moder

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Dustin Fowler's curator insight, September 21, 2016 12:41 PM
A great, short synopsis of the diffusion of Latin through the Romance Languages! 
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xkcd: Orbiter

xkcd: Orbiter | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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I've always enjoyed this comic strip...it highlights some of the difficulties in teaching about the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. 

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, political, language, toponyms, Middle East.

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Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 18, 2016 4:07 AM

I've always enjoyed this comic strip...it highlights some of the difficulties in teaching about the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. 

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, political, language, toponyms, Middle East.

EP Eric Pichon's curator insight, March 18, 2016 4:48 AM

...some of the difficulties in teaching about the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. 

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, political, language, toponyms, Middle East.

Leonardo Wild's curator insight, March 18, 2016 9:10 AM

I've always enjoyed this comic strip...it highlights some of the difficulties in teaching about the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. 

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, political, language, toponyms, Middle East.

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The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


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Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 2014 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 11, 2015 11:46 PM

Summary- This video explains how so many languages came to be and why. By the early existence of human there was a such smaller variety of languages. Tribes that spoke one language would often split in search of new recourses. Searching tribe would develop in many new different ways than the original tribe. new foods, land, and other elements created a radically different language than the original. 

 

Insight- In unit 3 we study language as a big element of out chapter. One key question in chapter 6 was why are languages distributed the way they are. It is obvious from the video that languages are distributed they way they are is because of the breaking up from people which forced people to develop differently thus creating a different language. As this process continues, there become more and more branches of a language family.  

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Why Are There So Many Different Names for Germany?

"Germany, Deutschland, Allemagne, Tyskland, Vacija, Saksa, Niemcy..."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 1, 2015 1:14 PM

Not only are their so many names for Germany, they are also from very distinct linguistic and historic origins.  Being at the center of Europe has put Germans is connect with many ethnic groups, part of why there are so names for Germany. 

 

TagsGermanylanguage, toponyms, culturediffusion.

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English--History and Connotations

"What is the difference between 'a hearty welcome' and 'a cordial reception'? In a brief, action-packed history of the English language, Kate Gardoqui explains why these semantically equal phrases evoke such different images."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 7, 2017 2:42 PM

This TED-ED video (and lesson) shows how the connotations of English words often times depend on the linguistic root (sweat--Germanic, perspire--Latin). English has obviously changed much over the years, but this other TED-ED video (and lesson) also shows some good language family information and traces it back to proto-Indo-European roots.

    

Tags: languagecultureEnglishTED, video.

Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 1:19 PM
It is very interesting to see how far the English language has come and how much is has changed over the past 1600 years. Adding to that it is intriguing to see what other languages had an influence on English. I knew that German and English were very similar languages which made sense that German had a large influence on the English language. Although, it did take me by surprise that French has made quite an impact on English as well. Also, that royal Englishmen spoke French for three centuries. That piece of information shocked me since France and England have had such a historic rivalry that lasted for centuries. Overall, I enjoyed this video and the border maps helped me to better understand the evolution of the English language.
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How the letters of the alphabet got their names

How the letters of the alphabet got their names | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
There seems to be little predictability to the English names for the letters of the alphabet, to say nothing of the names of letters in other languages. Some begin with an e-as-in-egg sound (eff, ell); some end in an ee sound (tee, dee); and others have no obvious rhyme or reason to them at all. How did they get that way?

 

Tags: language, culture, historical, English.


Via Seth Dixon, Scarpaci Human Geography
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How the letters of the alphabet got their names

How the letters of the alphabet got their names | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
There seems to be little predictability to the English names for the letters of the alphabet, to say nothing of the names of letters in other languages. Some begin with an e-as-in-egg sound (eff, ell); some end in an ee sound (tee, dee); and others have no obvious rhyme or reason to them at all. How did they get that way?

 

Tags: language, culture, historical, English.


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Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages

Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 29, 2017 8:50 AM
Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages
Ziggi Ivan Santini's curator insight, November 30, 2017 4:00 AM

This infographic is a great way to visualize the dominant languages on Earth.

LLewe LLyn Cooper's curator insight, January 14, 10:07 PM
Languages all over the world
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Language: The cornerstone of national identity

Language: The cornerstone of national identity | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Of the national identity attributes included in the Pew Research Center survey, language far and away is seen as the most critical to national identity. Majorities in each of the 14 countries polled say it is very important to speak the native language to be considered a true member of the nation."


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Richard Aitchison's curator insight, February 6, 9:03 AM
The link between language and national identity is important as shown in this article as Europeans believe it is the the number one link and most important.  From an American standpoint this was interesting to read as the trend nowadays, especially in America is to be more open to multiple languages and always viewing Europe as a place where many of the people that would live their would speak multiple languages as well.  How we communicate with people is very important obviously and now it has even become a political issue.  If you tend to lend more left you link national identity and language less and if you lean more right you tend to link national identity and language more. This is something that will continue to play out in the United States over the next decade as the Hispanic community continues to grow in the country and language will come to the forefront. While America has always been a melting pot of people, English has always survived as its dominate language and a way to identify Americans. Twenty or Thirty years from now will that continue? Will Americans lose that as and Identity, how will that effect them? Will this become a major political battle as well, how will this play out in elections in 2020, 2024, 2028, and beyond. Some very interesting trends to look at.  
Douglas Vance's curator insight, February 9, 3:37 PM
For most of Europe, but especially older and more conservative Europeans, being able to speak the language of the country you live in is incredibly closely tied to national identity. Therefore, immigrants who arrive and do not speak the language are viewed as "others" and not belonging. This close tie between language and national identity serves as one of the fuels for anti-immigrant sentiments in many European nations. Although this sentiment is not confined to just Europe.
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, March 9, 2:26 PM
(Europe) Throughout Europe and North America, the majority of citizens believe the national language is essential to the country's identity. For immigrants to be considered a part of these countries, the majority believe proficiency is required. In the United States, age, education, and religion are all factors contributing to this view, however race has little effect on people's view of language. Like America, older and more conservative Europeans place a higher emphasis on language. National identity can be a geopolitical problem for the European Union because some countries believe the 24 official languages subvert autonomy and internal unity. Interestingly Canada, a country with two official languages, places a lessor importance on language, with only a 59% majority believing it is fundamental to identity.
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The Endangered Languages Project

The Endangered Languages Project is a website for people to find and share the most up-to-date and comprehensive information about the over 3,000 endangered ...

 

This short video is a great primer for understanding the importance of linguistic diversity.  Why the loss of linguistic diversity (a global phenomenon) related to other themes  on geography, such as political and economic autonomy for minority groups?  Why are so many languages vanishing today?  What forces are creating these emerging cultural patterns?  For more on the project, see: http://www.endangeredlanguages.com/


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 11:59 AM

This is a great website in which everyone should look at because it shows how everyone can come together and help preserve all these languages we all hear today. Day by day languages are becoming extinct because they are speaking English one of the most spoken languages in the world and everyone speaks it or speaks little of it that people can understand. More languages are becoming extinct day by day.

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Gullah Culture

"While Gullah was not originally a written language and has never had a governing authority or dictionary, linguistic scholars have found that the language is internally consistent and in some ways more efficient and expressive than standard English. Elements of the language have seeped into African-American Vernacular English across the country."

 

For the first time in recent memory, the Charleston County School Board is discussing how to address the specific needs of Gullah and Geechee students, children of a culture whose linguistic origins trace back to the west coast of Africa via the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Some teachers have said the students' way of speaking — whether in the heavily West African-influenced Gullah language or in the more Anglicized dialects sometimes known as Geechee — can present an obstacle to understanding in the classroom. Like many Lowcountry Gullah speakers of her generation, the current head of state for the Gullah/Geechee Nation carries painful memories of adults who taught her to hold her family's way of speaking in contempt.

 

Tags: language, culture, race, education, historical.


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Alex Smiga's curator insight, May 31, 2017 10:58 AM
A truly unique gem of American culture, absolutely fascinating.
Mr Mac's curator insight, July 10, 2017 11:26 AM
Unit 3 - Folk Culture, Regions, Language, race/ethnicity
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BBC - Today - The death of language?

BBC - Today - The death of language? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
With the number of languages steadily shrinking, what is lost when a language dies?

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Dustin Fowler's curator insight, October 8, 2016 8:56 PM
If you're looking for material to get students to think of the implications of language and culture loss due to globalization, this article is a great, to the point read.  Also, lets not forget the Vanishing Languages article by Nat Geo- a longer, more thorough breakdown (links below).  Also, if you (like me) are always looking for a video, here's a great Ted Talk on the subject- one of my favorites for culture. 

I especially like the opinions listed at the end of this article.  We could have our students write their own 1-2 sentence justifications either for or against cultural diversity/globalization of language.  Enjoy!

Vanishing Languages
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/07/vanishing-languages/rymer-text

Why Cultural Diversity Matters
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=48RoRi0ddRU&index=35&list=PLjzsrA2l5DlmbXHcSc7-3yRYlFVzKVMnH

And BONUS- an opposing YouTube opinion.. How Language Transformed Humanity
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImQrUjlyHUg
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How to Say 'Banana' in Spanish

How to Say 'Banana' in Spanish | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 22, 2016 3:02 PM

I've lived in both the plátano and banano sub-regions of the Spanish-speaking realm and this discrepancy was one I always found curious (likewise, peanut butter is called crema de cacahuate in Mexico, but mantequilla de maní in Costa Rica). I've had many humorous encounters with friends from throughout the Spanish-speaking world when words that mean one thing in a particular country have VERY different connotations in another.

 

Questions to Ponder: Why do languages have different vocabularies in distinct places?  Why makes a language especially prone to a varied set of regionalized terms?

 

Tags: language, colonialismdiffusion, culture, mapping, regions.

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What's in a Flag's Design?

What's in a Flag's Design? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A new infographic by a pair of Danish designers has everything you never knew you wanted to know about the world’s flags.

 

Tags: flag, language, culture.


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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, August 4, 2016 11:13 AM
Colors represent specific information in different cultures and countries.  History, culture, and other significant information can be represented in flags and their colors.  Read this and see if the information is what you would have predicted.
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Persian (or Arabian) Gulf Is Caught in the Middle of Regional Rivalries

Persian (or Arabian) Gulf Is Caught in the Middle of Regional Rivalries | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Tensions between Iran and Saudi Arabia have been escalating on many fronts — over wars in Syria and Yemen, the Saudis’ execution of a dissident Shiite cleric and the Iran nuclear deal. The dispute runs so deep that the regional rivals — one a Shiite theocracy, the other a Sunni monarchy — even clash over the name of the body of water that separates them.

Iran insists that it be called the Persian Gulf, and has banned publications that fail to use that name. Yet this riles Arab nations, which have succeeded in pushing various parties to use their preferred term — Arabian Gulf."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 3, 2016 2:36 PM

Is it the Persian Gulf or the Arabian Gulf?  This mini-controversy is part of a broader fight to exert greater regional power and influence (see also this article on GeoCurrents on the same topic). 

 

Tags: placeregions, language, toponyms.

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English and Its Undeserved Good Luck: Lingua Franca

English and Its Undeserved Good Luck: Lingua Franca | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"In my post last week I cited a few ways in which English is unsuitable as a global language, and mentioned that its being one anyway is attributable at least in part to undeserved luck. Of course, it wasn’t all luck."

 

Tags: language, colonialism,  diffusion, culture, English.


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jorden harris's curator insight, March 10, 2016 10:02 AM
the fact that out of all of the languages that could have been a lingua franca is suprising J.H.
Logan scully's curator insight, March 10, 2016 10:13 AM
It is astouding to me that out of all those languages that could have been a lingua franca.-L.S.
Cohen Adkins's curator insight, March 10, 2016 10:18 AM
In my opinion i believe that English should be used and learned by every country since most of the world already uses it.It would be more convenient for others to speak English however people should also be required to learn a side language and not just for college. -C.A