AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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How To Travel While Black During Jim Crow

How To Travel While Black During Jim Crow | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"A postal worker created a guide for black travelers that was published almost every year from 1936 to 1966."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 4, 2015 2:56 PM

The effects of globalization and technologies are uneven; this is a very clear example of how mobility and access to other places can be limited based on various segments of the population. It is repugnant to think that such a book was ever necessary in this country, but it is heartening to see the evidence of an organized network that worked to lessen the pain of those oppressed by it (podcast on the Green Book and an additional article).     

Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.   

 

Tagsmobilitytransportationrace, classculture, historical, USA, ethnicity.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, December 22, 2015 7:56 AM

Back in the day when one travelled while being black there were restrictions in many places. There also were places where one could not stay , and places where you would not be safe.

The confederate flag was a marker , most of the time to let you know that you were not welcome. Of course there were restrictions on busses, trains, and in some cities you had to take a black cab.

 

Lots of people belonged to social clubs , sororities, fraternities and those memberships encouraged people to invite guests into their homes. Many of us did the relatives map. ie. traveled to where family lived. It was magic to be able to go to places in New York, Philadelphia and Boston.,Still you needed to know little things.

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Giving the Poor Easy Access to Healthy Food Doesn’t Mean They’ll Buy It

Giving the Poor Easy Access to Healthy Food Doesn’t Mean They’ll Buy It | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Those living in areas without fresh produce tend not to eat well. But just putting in a supermarket is not a panacea, it turns out.

 

Tags: food distribution, food, economic, poverty, place, socioeconomic, neighborhood.


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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 10, 2015 9:27 AM

Stigmergy at work.

Meridith Hembree Berry's curator insight, May 10, 2015 3:55 PM

It is difficult to change the junk food and convenience food culture in one generation. 

Robert Slone's curator insight, May 19, 2015 9:04 AM

This was really surprising , it is amazing how education effects every area of our lives .

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Linguistic Geography: My Fair Lady


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 13, 2015 8:57 AM

This is a most decidedly dated reference for pop culture, but a great movie for making explicit the idea that the way we speak is connected to where we've lived (also a good clip to show class differences as well as gender norms). The clip highlights many principles and patterns for understanding the geography of languages.


Tags: Language, class, gender, culture, historical, London, unit 3 culture and place.

Mrs. B's curator insight, May 2, 2015 9:03 PM

LOVE this clip! #Unit 3

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In Climbing Income Ladder, Location Matters

In Climbing Income Ladder, Location Matters | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The odds of rising to another income level are notably low in certain cities, like Atlanta and Charlotte, and much higher in New York and Boston.

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Ryane Williams's curator insight, July 22, 2013 8:47 PM

Facilities management entails a broad array of disciplines including, but not limited to, planning, designing, leasing, space planning, product management, capital management, construction management, property management, and real estate acquisition, planning and disposal.

Jordan Anderson- www.havefunandprofit.com's curator insight, July 22, 2013 8:58 PM

Location is very important to have more income!

Charles Henderson's comment, August 14, 2013 12:37 AM
Would have been nice for them to include cost of living comparisons. You might be in the top 20% of the country making $107,000 in NYC, but that's only $48,000 in Atlanta. Median income in Atlanta is $30,000 which would be $67,000 in NYC (about $21000 higher than NYC's current median salary). Where you live makes a difference, but HOW you live is just as important.
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The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man

The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

The U.S. economy once worked like a finely meshed machine. That is not true anymore. The U.S. economy is still a powerful engine, but workers aren’t seeing the benefits, less-educated men are struggling, and the rich have disconnected from everyone else.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 16, 2012 3:39 PM

The problems with the economy are not universally spread throughout society.  Certain segments are impacted more than others by the current struggles, especially when with look at axes of identity, such as class, gender and ethnicity.  While planning on a blue-collar job in the 1950s could have been a solid career plan for a young man in the United States, not so in the 21st century.     


Tags: labor, gender, class, industry, education.

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Linguistic Geography: My Fair Lady

This is a most decidedly dated reference for pop culture, but a great movie for making explicit the idea that the way we speak is connected to where we've lived (also a good clip to show class differences as well as gender norms). The clip highlights many principles and patterns for understanding the geography of languages.

 

Tags: Language, class, gender, culture, historical, London, unit 3 culture and place.

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The Geography of Educational Performance

The Geography of Educational Performance | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A new report from the Department of Education puts all the latest educational data at your fingertips.

 

Partly geography education, but this link is more the geography of education within the United States.  The top 10 states are in green, with the bottom 10 in red.  What factors play a role in the distribution patterns visible?   


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Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans

Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus over the past few years, according to local officials, border experts and demographers.

 

The migration from Mexico to the USA has slowed tremendously in the 21st century, but due to the drug violence, the demographic profile of the migrants has changed significantly. 


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Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 2014 1:22 PM

Despite Mexico making improvements to make Mexicans want to stay below the border. The drug trafficking violence does make people want to leave. Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans, wealthy businessmen and average Mexicans are fleeing Mexico and have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus, and they're being warmly welcomed, unlike the much larger population of illegal immigrants. Mexicans are fleeing cartel wars that have left more than 37,000 Mexicans dead in just 4 years, 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 2:12 PM

This article is interesting because we were used to seeing poorer immigrants from Mexico looking for work and a new way of life.  However, the more affluent communities are migrating North to the U.S. and legally because of the turmoil of the drug wars in their country.  It is disappointing to see that drugs, violence and murder are pushing away people from their own country

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 3, 2014 1:23 PM

For more affluent Mexicans the ability to migrate north is much easier than for the poor. They have the money and the skills to move into the United States. Also with the open lines of communication and ease of flux with business over the border make moving to the U.S. an excellent way to avoid being caught in the cross fire among drug cartels. For the poor however they are either forced to find work with the cartel or risk being an innocent bystander. It also makes you think about the terminology we use to describe Mexican immigrants, are they not refugees of this drug war?

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Jim Crow-Era Travel Guides

Jim Crow-Era Travel Guides | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"From 1936 to 1966, the 'Green Book' was a travel guide that provided black motorists with peace of mind while they drove through a country where racial segregation was the norm and sundown towns — where African-Americans had to leave after dark — were not uncommon."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 28, 2015 6:59 PM

The effects of globalization and technologies are uneven; this is a very clear example of how mobility and access to other places can be limited based on various segments of the population. It is repugnant to think that such a book was ever necessary in this country, but it is heartening to see the evidence of an organized network that worked to lessen the pain of those oppressed by it.    


This year's Geography Awareness Week's theme is "Explore! The Power of Maps."  Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.  


Tags: mobility, transportation, race, class, culture, historical, USA, ethnicity.

John Puchein's curator insight, November 12, 2015 8:08 AM

All I have to say is....wow. 

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Private jets flooding the Las Vegas airport before the Mayweather-Pacquiao fight

Private jets flooding the Las Vegas airport before the Mayweather-Pacquiao fight | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The airport is reportedly closed to private jets.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 4, 2015 12:53 PM

In a world where money grants you certain access and privilege, this is what happens when many seek to leverage their privilege simultaneously only to realize that they have to get in line like the common folks too.


In the Pixar Movie the Incredibles, Mrs. Incredible exasperately tells her son, "Everyone is special, Dash."  Dash grumbles under his breath and replies, "Which is another way of saying no one is." 


Tags: transportationclass.

Christian Faltado Cantos's curator insight, May 5, 2015 9:54 PM

Here what boxing and money can do....

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Bootlegging in Tribal Pakistan

Bootlegging in Tribal Pakistan | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In Pakistan's tribal areas, alcohol bootleggers, lured by enormous profits, have created clandestine delivery services to evade recent crackdowns by the Taliban and the police.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:48 PM

Alcohol bootleggers have been getting shutdown by the police force. Without this service, the bootleggers would be out of business and probably in jail. This is like prohibition in the U.S. and those who sold alcohol were fined and also arrested. The same thing is happening here where the bootleggers are trying to make huge money by selling something thats outlawed.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:36 PM

Interesting to see this happening in other areas of the world besides the United States during the times of prohibition.  If there is a will there is a way.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:57 AM

this makes sense. even in regions controlled by Muslim extremest people are people and they want their booze. this is a perfect example of the reason why you cannot punish all people of a certain group for the actions of a few.

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Brazil: Protests & Demonstrations

Brazil: Protests & Demonstrations | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Protests are ongoing in Brazil as people took to demonstrating against high World Cup spending....the unrest is the worst the nation has seen in two decades."


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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 30, 2014 8:07 PM

With all eyes on Brazil, the country is showing the world that it is more than just the world cup. Having protests in the media, Brazil is seen as a more than just a country with beautiful scenery and one with unrest due to political corruption and tax increases that effect the entire country.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 8:49 AM

These pictures show the other side of something that most of the world was looking forward to and enjoys. Just as with the Sochi Olympics, the World Cup in Brazil was not only an international event that was internationally important, but it was a local event for Brazilians as well, that had real impacts on their lives. Unfortunately, governments and corporations often fail to recognize or choose to ignore the ramifications of their enterprises on the everyday citizen. On the flip side of increased revenue in the form of tourism and foreign investment is increased government spending and likely higher taxes to fund an event that many Brazilians may not have even been able to attend. 

 

So while Brazil was the center of international attention, at least for a short time, the media did not show the rest of the world the unrest and unhappiness in the country. Instead, they focused on what teams might be playing in the World Cup and which team would likely win. They did not discuss or mention the protests that occurred because it would not bring in the desired ratings or money. The media, therefore, helped to facilitate a disconnect between global and local. In a global context, Brazil was the host of the World Cup and was preparing for one of the most important events in the most popular sport in the world. In a local context, however, Brazil was a nation rife with unrest regarding high government spending on an a sports tournament. That money could likely have been better spent somewhere else, but since that would not have fulfilled the immediate desires and goals of the Brazilian government, ordinary Brazilians were forced to suffer the consequences. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 1:15 PM

this is insane. the government is spending money they don't really have on events which should be considered something which comes after insuring your people are taken care of. this riot is totally understandable as the government is failing to use money from these peoples taxes to insure that they have basic amenities. this is growing more sickening as time goes on.

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China's New Bachelor Class

China's New Bachelor Class | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Gender imbalances in China have created a generation of men for whom finding love is no easy task

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 11:19 AM

Because of china’s one child policy the pool of available women had gone down, this leads many rural women to wish to marry up in economic circumstances leaving many rural men unmarried and once they pass the age of 30 less likely to ever marry.  China’s quandary with unbalanced sexes is a graphic example of what happens when one gender is preferred above anther leading to a reversal within a generation when scarcity of the other sex sets in.  Hopefully this experience will teach China to value both men and women in the future.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 20, 2014 9:22 AM

The one child policy coupled with a traditionally patriarchal society has created a major problem in China in regards to men finding a wife. The preference towards having a baby boy over having a baby girl has led to abortions and infanticide in order to secure a male child. Unfortunately, this has resulted in a severely larger male population. In China's growing economically aware society, women have all the power to ultimately chose their spouse, often times considering wealth and status over any other characteristics. In a way, the power and fate of China has shifted to the women of marrying age while millions of poorer, working class men are left to live their lives unmarried and alone.  

 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 8:42 PM

The more well off Chinese males are more apt to get with woman. Due to the gender imbalance caused by the one child policy of China, it is harder for the men who are born into less fortunate families to get married and that will cause them to lose out on love.

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Where the 1% Live

Where the 1% Live | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The richest Americans are gathered in a handful of metropolitan areas...

 

Spatial analysis shows that that 1% are not only economically clustered, but also geographically clustered in a handful of major metropolitan areas. 


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'Where Children Sleep'

'Where Children Sleep' | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
James Mollison wanted to portray children's diverse worlds. What better way to do so than to photograph their bedrooms?

 

Pictures with the children and the space they inhabit, creates a more personal touch to geographic context for students.  It builds what I call "geographic empathy," which builds on commonalities, instead of just reinforcing stereotypes.   


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Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:06 PM

This article is very interesting as it shows so much cultural difference by just taking pictures of a child's bedroom. The pictures portray the family's wealth, religion, technological advancements, and parenting style. 

 

When you look at the difference between some of the pictures it is horrible. Some of the children have an abundance of toys, while others don't even have their own room or have to sleep on the ground. It is also interesting to see how some pictures portray the person's lifestyle. Some have a very minimalist room with little luxuries, which can be for religious reasons or personal style.