AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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The Age of Borders

The Age of Borders | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The creation date of (almost) every international border.  Full-size image here."

 

Tags: infographic, worldwide, borders, political, historical.


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, February 23, 10:04 PM
Political Unit: History of  borders
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, February 27, 6:33 AM

Preliminary - Political Geography 

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The Two Koreas

The Two Koreas | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"While the Korean War of the early 1950s never formally ended, its aftermath has created starkly divergent worlds for those living on either side of the north-south divide. What follows is a look at life in the two Koreas; how such a night-and-day difference came to be; and where the crisis could go from here. Both governments claimed to be the legitimate rulers of the peninsula. Tensions between north and south gradually mounted, until finally, in June 1950, hundreds of thousands of North Korean troops stormed across the 38th parallel. The unsuspecting South Korean defenders were outgunned and outnumbered, and beat a hasty retreat southward."


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Alexis Rickey's curator insight, April 7, 1:30 PM
This article provides numerous amounts of information on the the Korean peninsula. The article explores in great detail the many difference between the North and South Koreas. Five major themes are explored: historical context (war history), political leadership, people and society, industry and economy, and current conflicts the Koreas have with one another. What's incredibly interesting is that while the both Koreas have quite a similar heritage, they live completely different lifestyles today. These difference lifestyles may be explained due to historical, economic, and political, and geopolitical difference the countries have. 
Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 12, 1:07 PM
It’s hard to see that two groups of people who speak the same language and have the same ethnic backgrounds can live such strikingly different existences.  It seems that the only thing they still have in common is their language and ethnicities.  When I was scrolling through this story, there were a few pieces that really stood out to me.  The first was that the Korean War technically hasn’t been formally concluded, which means that attacks on each other aren’t actually that out of the realm of possibilities.  The next thing was that North Korea’s birth rate is higher than South Korea’s, yet the population of South Korea is two times larger.  This reflects that the life expectancy of South Koreans is significantly longer and that their resources are used more efficiently.  Other statistics that stood out related to GDP.  Up until 1980 both North and South Korea’s GDPs were growing at basically the same rate.  But from that point forward, South Korea’s grew dramatically and North Korea’s actually decreased.  This leads up to today where the GDP of South Korea is $1.934 trillion and North Korea’s is only $40 billion.  Seeing as they are basically working with the same resources, since they share a similar geographic location, in most situations their GDPs would be even a tiny bit similar.  However, the way the economies of both countries are operated have created such a difference in their GDPs.  The infrastructure of the two countries are also wildly different.  The map of the two countries at night show that South Korea uses a lot of electricity, so practically the entire country is lit up.  North Korea is so dark that if I didn’t know that people lived there, I would assume it was uninhabited by any humans.  The statistic regarding the percentages of roads paved vs unpaved in the two countries also shows the stark contrast between their infrastructure.  Only 3% of roads in North Korea are paved!  Whereas 92% of South Korea’s roads are paved.  The most unfortunate part of this whole situation is that there are millions of people who live in North Korea and must suffer with little hope of escaping while their South Korean neighbors generally enjoy a modernized life.  This story map shows that sharing a location does not really mean that two groups of people will live similar lives.
Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 20, 12:34 PM
This expertly created set of data points and maps clearly lay out the stark differences between North and South Korea. Also, it shows how both countries have resources the other needs and how cooperation or reunification can benefit everyone. However, this article shows how the dramatic differences between these two countries politically, economically, and socially make that highly unlikely. 
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How the 1967 war changed the shape of Israel

How the 1967 war changed the shape of Israel | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
THE SIX-DAY WAR increased Israel’s territory threefold. The “borders of Auschwitz” were gone; the vulnerable nine-mile narrow waist acquired a thick cuirass with the mountains of the West Bank. Israel soon annexed East Jerusalem with some surrounding land; it did the same with the Golan Heights in 1981.

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, borders, political, Middle East.


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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, July 4, 2017 2:22 AM
How the 1967 war changed the shape of Israel
Allison Anthony's curator insight, July 5, 2017 6:12 PM

Middle East/Southwest Asia

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, March 27, 11:53 AM
Anyone who thinks they have a solution to dividing up Israel into a land for both Palestinians and Israelis should read this article, because it is basically impossible.  It seems that both Palestinians and Israelis tried to claim as much land as they could for their own during the second half of the twentieth century.  However, they didn’t seem to have a long term plan because basically none of the territories are autonomously Palestinian or Israeli.  There would be no way to divide the country without displacing millions of people.  Jerusalem itself is even more of a mess because it is divided between Jews, Muslims, Christians and Armenians.  There would be no way to grant full control of Jerusalem to one group without causing major conflict.  The very last part of this article describes what both Israelis and Palestinians believe qualify them for greater power in the territory.  Both believe that whoever has a higher population should be entitled to more control.  The problem is that Palestians calculate that their population is about to be equal to the Israelis, but the Israelis believe the birth rate of the Orthodox Jews is high enough to keep their population larger.  It’s pretty hard to tell which group is correct because they are both very biased on the matter.  The settlement patterns and the stubbornness of both the Israelis and the Palestinians leave little hope that this conflict will be solved anytime soon.
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Why China is building islands in the South China Sea

"China is building islands in the South China sea and its causing disputes among the other nations in the region; Malaysia, the Philippines, Brunei, Vietnam, and Indonesia. China claims they aren't military bases, but their actions say otherwise. The US has many allies in the region and uses its massive Navy to patrol international waters, keeping shipping lanes open for trade."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 4, 2017 4:10 PM

Last year this was an intriguing story but now the geopolitical drama is growing as more countries are literally building islands out of reef outcroppings to strengthen their claims to the South China Sea.  For some without geographic expertise, this might some baffling.  For those that understand Exclusive Economic Zones, maritime claims, and expanding geopolitical aspirations, this makes perfect sense. 

 

Tags: borders, political, conflict, waterChina, East Asia.

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 11, 1:33 PM
China is being very sneaky in their attempt to control the South China Sea and have decided they don’t want to listen to any international laws or court rulings that don’t follow what they want.  In order to strengthen their claims to the South China Sea and increase their land holdings, the Chinese have decided to literally build islands in the body of water.  These islands are then used as naval bases to help them take over other islands that are held by other countries in the South China Sea.  Their strategy for taking over these islands is called the “Cabbage strategy” where they quietly surround and blockade the islands from the countries who hold control over them in order to take them over.  As much as the other countries bordering the South China Sea do not like what China is doing, they are unable to challenge them too much because China’s navy is the most powerful in the region.  This is a situation that shouldn’t be so escalated because international maritime laws have established that countries can control the water 200 miles off their coasts, which would mean China would control part of the sea, other East Asian countries would control part of the sea, and the center of the sea would be international waters.  However, the natural resources in the sea are irresistible to China, so they have started literally building islands and taking over tiny islands that would normally have no one on them.  Other countries in the South China Sea have responded by building and settling on these ridiculously small islands as well.  China has now taken their claims a step farther and claimed airspace above the South China Sea.  The recent breakthroughs in technology have changed the way that governments can claim their borders and made geography more complicated.  The reason that China has been getting away with this is that no country except the U.S. can keep China in check.  However, it would be impossible to threaten China with the American Navy without causing a much bigger military conflict.  So for now, China quietly continues taking over the South China Sea.
Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 21, 10:23 AM
The vast resources in the South China Sea and the benefits of the Exclusive Economic Zone make it clear why china wants and currently is building islands in the South China Sea. By occupying these newly created islands and claiming them for their own, they can extend their area of economic control by 200 nautical miles. For a nation that is rapidly industrializing and is heavily dependent on fossil fuels, these new areas of control are monumentally important.
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Israeli settlements, explained

"Both sides claim the West Bank as legitimately belonging to them. Over time, and especially as Israeli politics has shifted rightward, the settler movement has become an institutionalized part of Israeli society. Support comes in the form of building permits, public investment, and even incentives for Israelis to move into the West Bank. While peace talks remain frozen, the settlements continue to grow, making any possibility of a Palestinian state in the West Bank faint."


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David G Tibbs's curator insight, March 22, 1:25 PM
The settlements started out has a religious spreading. However, that has dramatically changed over time due to economic reasons. Not only that the amount of government support for the people living in these lands are incredible, even in an outpost that is deemed illegal. The country occasionally goes into illegal areas and tear down houses to show a tough face on them. The government and its people theorized that more will come home and that the populations in the settlements will grow to half a million. The international community and Israeli must come up with a strategy before it gets to the point of no turning back. 
 
Taylor Doonan's curator insight, March 23, 12:55 PM
This video gives some in depth background on how Israel and Palestine are severely intermingled. It goes into the history of the creation of Israel and it talks extensively about the West Bank region and who lives there and who controls what parts. The region is very intertwined and more Israelis are moving into the region and how it would become more and more difficult to separate the region into two states. 
brielle blais's curator insight, April 1, 4:34 PM
This shows how important clear and distinct boarders are for different countries. In this case, that is important because Palstine feels their land is justing getting taken, while Israel argues they are returning to their homeland. Either way, the rest of the world believes what Israel is doing is illegal and Palestine should have it's own autonomy as a state, in a two-state system.
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Israeli-Palestinian Conflict updates, 2016

Israeli-Palestinian Conflict updates, 2016 | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is one that powerfully divides the international community.  Of those living within the state of Israel, Pew Research data shows that they are often deeply divided based on religious affiliation. Not surprisingly, those divisions extend into how they view the peace process, West Bank settlements and U.S. support.  Although the conflict is portrayed as a battle between religious groups, it can be more fairly assessed as two nationalistic groups competing for land.  Broadly speaking, the Muslim world has sided with the Palestinians, and the U.S. and its NATO allies have defended Israel.   In the United Nation’s Security Council, the United States’ veto power has been use to strike down resolutions that would condemn Israeli settlement in the militarily occupied lands of the West Bank.  The 2016 UN resolution that passed 14-0 (with only the U.S. abstaining) says that Israel’s settlements on Palestinian territory occupied since 1967, including East Jerusalem, have “no legal validity” and demands a halt to “all Israeli settlement activities,” saying this “is essential for salvaging the two-state solution.”

 

These settlements are considered by most of the international community to be illegal, and the UN has condemned them, but since the U.S. has always vetoed this, Israel has never been formally reprimanded.  Earlier this week, the U.S. abstained from the vote, and the many see the U.S. position as hypocritical, (Secretary of State John Kerry strongly defended the position).

 

Some highly partisan supporters of Israel do not see Israel’s actions as the problem, primarily because Israel’s neighbors have traditionally not recognized its right to exist, and attacked it many times.  Therefore, they see Israel’s actions as necessary for the security of Israel, and do not see Israel’s settlements in the West Bank as illegal since Palestine isn’t a state that was ever legally accepted. 

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, conflict, borders, political, Middle East.


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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 9, 2017 2:14 AM
Israeli-Palestinian Conflict updates, 2016
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Germany reunified 26 years ago, but some divisions are still strong

Germany reunified 26 years ago, but some divisions are still strong | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"While 75 percent of Germans who live in the east said that they considered their country's reunification a success, only half of western Germans agreed. With eastern and western Germans blaming each other for past mistakes over the past two years, that frustration has likely increased. Younger citizens, especially — who do not usually identify themselves with their area of origin as strongly anymore — have grown worried about the persistent skepticism on both sides. But where do those divisions come from? And how different are eastern and western Germany today?"


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Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, November 1, 2016 11:25 AM
Seth Dixon's insight: This series of 10 maps (and 1 satellite image) highlights many of the cultural and economic divisions between East and West, despite efforts to in the last 26 years to smooth out these discrepancies. The social geographies imposed by the Iron Curtain and the Berlin Wall are still being felt from this relic border and will for years to come.
Douglas Vance's curator insight, February 9, 3:00 PM
The social, political, and economic impacts of reunification are still being flt today. The old policies of both East and West Germany still impact the cultural and social habits of Germans. Despite the borders between the two former nations being eliminated almost 30 years ago, the differences between the two halves of Germany will be felt for decades to come. Issues from vaccines to child care to trash production all feel the effects of the policies of the former division.
tyrone perry's curator insight, April 20, 11:48 AM
From when this article was written it has been 26 years since Germany was completely unified.  But over the last two years there has been a rift between east and west Germany.  Economically the east feels left behind by the west with their rise of wealth.  The west is mad that the east doesn’t taken in as many refugees as they do.  These rifts between the two are not making things easy to work out between the two.  All they are doing are pointing fingers and not coming up with solutions.  Many people of the younger generations don’t feel as divided as the older generations do.  They feel they are Germans and not east or west.  Maybe they can find a way to bring people together as one. 
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‘The Wall Is a Fantasy’

‘The Wall Is a Fantasy’ | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A week in the borderlands with migrants and guards.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 14, 2016 4:40 PM

This is not a political statement but a reiteration of the geographic realities of borders; they are inherently permeable and unite people just as much as they divide. 

 

Tags: Mexico, borders, political.   

Alexander peters's curator insight, October 17, 2016 12:41 PM
The Wall Is a Fantasy
By DECLAN WALSH OCT. 14, 2016
This article talks about an american high jumper that want a wall torn down so he goes to Donald j .Trump and he said no. I liked this article because it talks about the political side of things.
tyrone perry's curator insight, February 9, 7:31 PM
According to the people in the article, Mexicans as well as the drug lords will always find ways to get into the US regardless if a way goes up.  Many of them have tried several times to come in and have been caught, detained, brought back to Mexico and then tried again.  I have assisted the border agents in 2007 for five months on active duty orders.  Watching many of them trying to come here to better their lives and the struggles they have to endure is both impressive and sad.  It is the smugglers that are more of the problem and the will stop at nothing to get their product here.  Also according to some ranchers thou they want a closed border and land security they feel as if the wall is a waste because of the resiliency of the Mexicans. 
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Do You Know The Outline of These Countries?

Do You Know The Outline of These Countries? | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Can you spot the real outline from the fake?..

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 18, 2016 3:03 PM

This is just for fun...The borders/coastlines of these 14 countries are slightly photoshopped in one of the two images, and you have to remember from your mental maps which one is correct.  And yes, of course I got a 14. 

 

Tagsmapping, trivia, funborders, cartography.

Jamie Strickland's comment, August 19, 2016 10:37 AM
Love this --- will try with my classes when I talk about cognitive images and our mental maps!
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Point Roberts

Point Roberts | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
An American city stranded at the tip of a Canadian peninsula where strict adherence to the "49th parallel rule" became problematic.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 22, 2016 5:34 PM

I'm sharing this because what isn't exciting about an exclave that was created by a superimposed, geometric border?  

 

Tags: borders, political.

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It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders

It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Most of us think of international borders as invisible, but clear-cut lines: stand on one side, and you’re in one country; stand on the other, you’re in another country.  But here’s a list of five international borders that, for one reason or another, are not quite that simple."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 12, 2013 9:20 AM

This article is in dire needs of some maps, but it still provides 5 intriguing case studies of borders and chunks of territory that defy normal categorization.


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, July 13, 2013 12:53 PM

It  is  Puzzling, but  every  human  being  chose to live in a normal,  happy  and  free  country, in a  Democratie,  if  possible.

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:20 PM

These borders and boundaries indicate something that I thought of while rewatching Independence Day (the Smith/Goldblum flick from '96)...  If we make a mess, and destroy this planet, aliens wouldn't want it.  The land that no one wants, is probably wanted by someone in reality... I am a fervent believer in aliens, and spend my free time diving into attempts to solve my quandary about the higher questions of the universe.  I think that the area that no one wants, everyone wants.  Unlike state boundaries in the US, planets are divided as separate entities from other planets, but grouped in solar systems, galaxies, asteroid belts, etc... I can't wait for the day some pompous fool gets on the bridge of a starship from Earth and sits in the captain's chair and says "Lieutenant, take us to Sector ----- (so and so)"... We will have moved up from the United States and Canada to the United Sectors of Galaxies!  And that little bit of land that 'no one wants,' everyone actually wants... same with planets.  Terraforming will allow those unsightly balls of fury that float around a star to become the most inhabitable of them all!  I wonder where these things will stop... or if it keeps going to larger sectors, endlessly? Well, we will likely encounter other species with territorial claims... play nice, America!  Or the Aliens will pop out of your stomach.  Though there are some politicians now that seem to have popped out of someone's stomach, I think the threat is more domestic while territory disputes occur nowadays, as it is humans arguing with humans, but it will increase when the Martians come to claim what is theirs.

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Wall for nothing: the misjudged but growing taste for border fences

Wall for nothing: the misjudged but growing taste for border fences | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Globalisation was supposed to tear down barriers, but security fears and a widespread refusal to help migrants and refugees have fuelled a new spate of wall-building across the world, even if experts doubt their long-term effectiveness. When the Berlin Wall was torn down a quarter-century ago, there were 16 border fences around the world. Today, there are 65 either completed or under construction, according to Quebec University expert Elisabeth Vallet."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 18, 2015 12:11 PM

This is an intriguing opinion piece that would be good fodder for a class discussion on political geography or the current events/refugee crisis. 


Tags: borders, political.

Nflfootball Live's curator insight, September 19, 2015 8:04 AM

https://www.reddit.com/3ljqnq/

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 23, 2015 3:53 PM

unit 2 or 4

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What China Has Been Building in the South China Sea

What China Has Been Building in the South China Sea | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
China has been feverishly piling sand onto reefs in the South China Sea for the past year, creating seven new islets in the region. It is straining geopolitical tensions that were already taut.

Via Seth Dixon, Mary Rack
Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's insight:

Last year this was an intriguing story but now the geopolitical drama is growing as more countries are literally building islands out of reef outcroppings to strengthen their claims to the South China Sea.  This is the most comprehensive article that I've seen on the escalating situation.   

 

Tags: borders, political, conflict, water, China, East Asia.

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:01 PM

this strategy makes sense, even if it ignores international laws and angers every other nation on earth. china needs resources, and the south china sea has resources.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 4:02 PM

The fact that China is doing this in the first place is a profound geopolitical statement. They are in effect disregarding international law and acting as though they own the region. This also fly's in the face of countries in the Area such as Vietnam and the Philippines who have territorial water claims in that area of the region itself has been a matter of dispute for decades. This is partially due to the fact there is key oil and gas resources and china intends to use the islands they have made to claim and seize those deposits. trade also goes through the area making it possible for China to shut down regional trade if it gains these waters. This is a clear power display and shows China wants to supersede the U.S. not work with it. Hopefully the issue is resolved peacefully given that it has been causing heightened tensions with the Chinese Navy patrolling the area. The international community should have acted earlier to stop this because now it will be far more difficult and makes nations like the U.S. look weaker. Not to mention the vast environmental consequences for destroying reefs filled with unique wildlife thus disrupting the ecosystem.

Gouraud's curator insight, January 6, 2016 3:16 PM

En une année pour construire un port et un terrain d’atterrissage à partir d'un atoll submergé....

Inquiétant.

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Where should we send Johnny next?

Submit a story idea: https://goo.gl/vo5Amc Follow Johnny's progress on Facebook: https://goo.gl/FVVfAh Follow Johnny on Instagram: https://goo.gl/u1zkL

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Gibraltar Bay

Gibraltar Bay | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Gibraltar Bay, located near the southernmost tip of the Iberian Peninsula, is the central feature of this astronaut photograph. The famous Rock of Gibraltar that forms the northeastern border of the bay is formed of Jurassic-era seafloor sediments that solidified into limestone, a rock formed mostly of the mineral calcite, which is found in the shells of sea creatures. The limestone was subsequently lifted above the ocean surface when the African and Eurasian tectonic plates collided."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 5, 2017 3:58 PM

Gibraltar is an exclave of the UK on a peninsula connected to the Spanish mainland that controls access to the Mediterranean Sea; there is naturally going to be friction over this unusual political configuration. "La Linea" marked on the image is the international border

 

Questions to Ponder: Why are both Spain and the UK invested in this piece of territory?  What challenges are there for a small exclave when neighbors aren't friendly?  How does Spanish and British supranational connections impact this issue?

 

Tags: borders, political, Spain, Europe.

Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, March 9, 1:37 PM
(Europe) Gibraltar Bay is an important economic and political region located on the very southern tip of the Iberian Peninsula. The UK owns city of Gibraltar while the surrounding area is in Spain. The Strait of Gibraltar is a passage separating Spain in Europe and Morocco in Africa, allowing transport between the Atlantic and Mediterranean. The area has tactical value because of the inflow of ships and its geographic position, but also houses oil processing and tourism industries.
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How the 1967 war changed the shape of Israel

How the 1967 war changed the shape of Israel | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
THE SIX-DAY WAR increased Israel’s territory threefold. The “borders of Auschwitz” were gone; the vulnerable nine-mile narrow waist acquired a thick cuirass with the mountains of the West Bank. Israel soon annexed East Jerusalem with some surrounding land; it did the same with the Golan Heights in 1981.

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, borders, political, Middle East.


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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, July 4, 2017 2:22 AM
How the 1967 war changed the shape of Israel
Allison Anthony's curator insight, July 5, 2017 6:12 PM

Middle East/Southwest Asia

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, March 27, 11:53 AM
Anyone who thinks they have a solution to dividing up Israel into a land for both Palestinians and Israelis should read this article, because it is basically impossible.  It seems that both Palestinians and Israelis tried to claim as much land as they could for their own during the second half of the twentieth century.  However, they didn’t seem to have a long term plan because basically none of the territories are autonomously Palestinian or Israeli.  There would be no way to divide the country without displacing millions of people.  Jerusalem itself is even more of a mess because it is divided between Jews, Muslims, Christians and Armenians.  There would be no way to grant full control of Jerusalem to one group without causing major conflict.  The very last part of this article describes what both Israelis and Palestinians believe qualify them for greater power in the territory.  Both believe that whoever has a higher population should be entitled to more control.  The problem is that Palestians calculate that their population is about to be equal to the Israelis, but the Israelis believe the birth rate of the Orthodox Jews is high enough to keep their population larger.  It’s pretty hard to tell which group is correct because they are both very biased on the matter.  The settlement patterns and the stubbornness of both the Israelis and the Palestinians leave little hope that this conflict will be solved anytime soon.
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Minnesota becomes a gateway to Canada for rejected African migrants

More than 430 African migrants have arrived in Winnipeg since April, up from 70 three years ago. Most come by way of Minneapolis, sometimes after grueling treks across Latin America and stints in U.S. immigration detention.

 

A tangle of factors is fueling the surge: brisker traffic along an immigrant smuggling route out of East Africa, stepped-up deportations under the Obama administration and the lure of Canada’s gentler welcome. Advocates expect the Trump administration’s harder line on immigration will spur even more illegal crossings into Canada, where some nonprofits serving asylum seekers are already overwhelmed. Now Canadians worry smugglers are making fresh profits from asylum seekers and migrants take more risks to make the crossing.

 

Tags: migration, USA, Canada, borders, political.


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Israeli settlements, explained

"Both sides claim the West Bank as legitimately belonging to them. Over time, and especially as Israeli politics has shifted rightward, the settler movement has become an institutionalized part of Israeli society. Support comes in the form of building permits, public investment, and even incentives for Israelis to move into the West Bank. While peace talks remain frozen, the settlements continue to grow, making any possibility of a Palestinian state in the West Bank faint."


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David G Tibbs's curator insight, March 22, 1:25 PM
The settlements started out has a religious spreading. However, that has dramatically changed over time due to economic reasons. Not only that the amount of government support for the people living in these lands are incredible, even in an outpost that is deemed illegal. The country occasionally goes into illegal areas and tear down houses to show a tough face on them. The government and its people theorized that more will come home and that the populations in the settlements will grow to half a million. The international community and Israeli must come up with a strategy before it gets to the point of no turning back. 
 
Taylor Doonan's curator insight, March 23, 12:55 PM
This video gives some in depth background on how Israel and Palestine are severely intermingled. It goes into the history of the creation of Israel and it talks extensively about the West Bank region and who lives there and who controls what parts. The region is very intertwined and more Israelis are moving into the region and how it would become more and more difficult to separate the region into two states. 
brielle blais's curator insight, April 1, 4:34 PM
This shows how important clear and distinct boarders are for different countries. In this case, that is important because Palstine feels their land is justing getting taken, while Israel argues they are returning to their homeland. Either way, the rest of the world believes what Israel is doing is illegal and Palestine should have it's own autonomy as a state, in a two-state system.
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Belgium and the Netherlands Swap Land, and Remain Friends

Belgium and the Netherlands Swap Land, and Remain Friends | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The discovery of a headless corpse in the Netherlands helped Belgium and its bigger Dutch neighbor resolve a property squabble that began in 1961.

 

In a region that has long known geopolitical and linguistic squabbles, and where Belgium has lived in the shadow of its neighbor, the land swap was anything but inevitable. In 1961, when the Meuse was reconfigured to aid navigation, it had the side effect of pushing three pieces of land onto the wrong side of the river. The uninhabited area subsequently gained a reputation for lawlessness, wild parties and prostitution.

 

Tags: borders, political, territoriality, Belgium, Netherlands, unit 4 political, Europe.


Via Seth Dixon, Scarpaci Human Geography
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Taylor Doonan's curator insight, February 15, 7:21 PM
This shows a peaceful glimpse into the future of potentially the world. When borders don't make sense a peaceful sit-down resulting in subtle changes of borders makes sense. Though this is extremely hard to attain, Belgium and the Netherlands achieved this. When a body was found and the wrong authorities were called and the correct authorities could not reasonably get to the land the deal was made creating borders between the two nations that made sense. 
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, March 9, 2:05 PM
(Europe) The Belgian-Dutch border on Meuse River was drawn to aid navigation but caused parts of each country to end up on the wrong side of the river. When a murder happened on Belgian land on the opposing river bank and required a tricky river landing, the countries realized the impracticality. Without fighting over land in other regions of the world, Belgium relinquished 35 acres and the Netherlands gave up 7 peacefully, strengthening their relations. Illogical borders like this exist throughout the world, including between Norway and Finland and the US and Canada.
brielle blais's curator insight, March 24, 12:37 PM
This article shows that despite small geopolitical and linguistic squabbles, Belgium and Norway still peacefully traded land to fix unreasonable boarders. This also showcases the importance of maintaining friendly relations and practical boarders between countries. A peninsula belonging to the Netherlands was cut off by a treacherous river and Belgium, through which the Dutch needed special permission to cross over. After the peninsula became a hub for lawlessness, it was agreed by both countries that the boarder needed to be fixed. This shows that these changes can be done peacefully by countries and that geographic location is very important. 
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Turkey’s New Maps Are Reclaiming the Ottoman Empire

Turkey’s New Maps Are Reclaiming the Ottoman Empire | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Erdogan’s aggressive nationalism is now spilling over Turkey’s borders, grabbing land in Greece and Iraq.

 

In the past few weeks, a conflict between Ankara and Baghdad over Turkey’s role in the liberation of Mosul has precipitated an alarming burst of Turkish irredentism. President Erdogan criticized the Treaty of Lausanne, which created the borders of modern Turkey, for leaving the country too small. Turkey won’t be annexing part of Iraq anytime soon, but this combination of irredentist cartography and rhetoric nonetheless offers some insight into Turkey’s current foreign and domestic policies and Ankara’s self-image.  The military interventions and confrontational rhetoric this nationalism inspires may worsen Turkey’s security and regional standing.

 

Tags: political, irredentism, culture, Turkey, historical, borders, empire, geopolitics.


Via Seth Dixon
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Country Cluster Quiz

Country Cluster Quiz | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"No borders. No landmarks. No context. How many countries will you be able to recognize? Here’s how this works. I give you a the outline of several countries together, without borders or any other context, and you guess which countries you’re looking at."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 21, 2016 4:26 PM

This is not the most difficult geography quiz (as advertised on Buzzfeed), but it does take some time since all the countries in a given cluster aren't all immediately obvious.  The fact that it is multiple choice certainly simplifies the this quiz.

 

Tagsmapping, trivia, funborders.

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Old Mexico lives on

Old Mexico lives on | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
On February 2nd 1848, following a short and one-sided war, Mexico agreed to cede more than half its territory to the United States. An area covering most of present-day Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah, plus parts of several other states, was handed over to gringolandia. The rebellious state of Tejas, which had declared its independence from Mexico in 1836, was recognised as American soil too. But a century and a half later, communities have proved more durable than borders. The counties with the highest concentration of Mexicans (as defined by ethnicity, rather than citizenship) overlap closely with the area that belonged to Mexico before the great gringo land-grab of 1848. Some are recent arrivals; others trace their roots to long before the map was redrawn. They didn’t jump the border—it jumped them.

 

Tags: culture, demographics, North America, historical, colonialism, borders, political.


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Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 10, 2017 6:51 AM
I say it all the time, culture does not respect boarders. 
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, January 25, 7:44 PM
(Mexico/Central America) The last sentence is particularly important for Americans to remember; with present day borders, the Mexicans were here long before us in much of the South West, much like the Native Americans in the rest of the country. Remembering that directly following the Mexican War, America gained more territory than in all of the Louisiana Purchase, it was impossible to completely assimilate the Mexicans who already lived there. More immigrants from Mexico will inevitably move to areas with similar ethnic backgrounds, so we have a region which will likely remain Mexican for centuries.
Nicole Canova's curator insight, February 9, 8:15 PM
Up until 170 years ago, a large portion of what is now the United States was actually controlled by Mexico.  Remarkably, this is still reflected in the ethnic makeup of the population of that area, which covers all or part of 8 states (all of California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas, and part of Colorado and Wyoming).  Political borders may determine citizenship, but they are by no means a hard division of ethnicity or culture.
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Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute

Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Three African leaders sign an initial deal to end a long-running dispute over the sharing of Nile waters and the building of Africa's biggest hydroelectric dam.

Via Seth Dixon, Adrian Bahan (MNPS)
Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's insight:

85% of the Nile's water comes from the Blue Nile that originates in the Ethiopian highlands--it is the Blue Nile that Ethiopia has been working on damming since 2011.  The Grand Ethiopia Renaissance Dam (GERD) will be located near the border with Sudan (see in Google Maps).  Prior to this trilateral agreement, Egypt and Sudan received the majority of the Nile's waters because of outdated colonial-era treaties that ignored upstream riparian states.  This explains why in the past, Egypt was so adamantly opposed to Ethiopia's plan fearing that their water supply with be threatened.  Today though, the Egyptian President said, "We have chosen cooperation, and to trust one another for the sake of development."  


Tags: Ethiopia, Africa, supranationalism, political, development, environment, water, energy, borders.

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David Lizotte's curator insight, April 10, 2015 3:29 PM

The key of this article is that there has been an initial treaty signed. This agreement overturns a colonial era treaty which stated any countries upstream (south of Egypt) essentially had no right to touch the Nile in any way that would effect Egypt. They had veto power over everything. 

The reason behind this is that Ethiopia had overthrown there colonial power-Italy, in the 1890's-and was henceforth its own country. Another attempt to seize Ethiopia took place in the 1930's under Benito Mussolini's rule. Him being a fascist and wanting to be like Hitler and take everything certainly contributed to Mussolini wanting to take Ethiopia. Another contributing factor is the fact that Italy tried and failed in claiming/colonizing Ethiopia. They had lost in the battle field. Mussolini wanted to improve and prove Eastern Italian Africa's dominance. Ethiopia would be freed of Italy's rule during WWII and become its own country once again. In any case the article states the treaty designed by the British was set forth in 1929. Ethiopia was not part of British Africa, or a protectorate (in regards to what Egypt would become in relation to the UK), so Britain would not care about the Nile in Ethiopia, rather the Nile in Sudan and especially in Egypt. Any country upstream is to not obstruct or deter the natural flow of the Nile-a pivotal source for Egyptian civilization. 90 percent of Egyptians live within 20km of the Nile while a little over 50 percent live within 1km. It is clear Egypt needs the Nile in order to function.

Ethiopia is able to create jobs through the building of the dam and will also be able to employ people through dam maintenance, inspections, etc... for years to come (if the dam is built). The dam will also provide an immense amount of power/energy, truly benefiting the country. The article states Ethiopia just wants to take a more fair share of the Nile. Everybody feels entitled to the Nile. This concept I understand. With that being said I also understand the concept of Egypt being concerned. There country functions though the Nile and its existing. 

I would like to see more of Ethiopia's plans and the statistics they've gathered throughout the duration of this project. I'm sure they have comprised some projected statistics, not just focusing on the positive aspects (for them) but also the negative aspects for Sudan and Egypt. The article states Sudan is on board but Egypt-although taking part in the new agreement thus putting aside the colonial era treaty- is very hesitant when discussing the existence of the dam. Obviously there are fair reasons for the concern...but then again exactly what are the reasons? How would the Nile be affected by the dam and also how would countries downstream (Egypt, Sudan) be affected? 

Its a concern amongst African countries but is it also a concern amongst the world? Will professionals from other countries "put their two cents in?" 

With all this being said, I suppose it does not matter...to Ethiopia. They have already begun the process of building and are about 30% completed. As stated in this bbc article: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-26679225 Another interesting factor is how other sub Saharan countries are in favor of the dam. Why? Being in favor means they probably benefit from the dam as well, however this is something that may come to my light at the dam progresses. Until the dams construction is arrested, the dam is certainly being built. Ethiopia is making ground, excuse me energy, to better its country as a whole.  

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 7:22 PM

This article discusses the dispute between Egypt and Ethiopia over the construction of a dam that would provide Ethiopia with a larger share of the Nile's water. Egypt is wholly opposed to this dam because it would mean less water for the country, which so desperately needs it. With 95% of the population of Egypt living within 20km of the Nile River, a reduction in the amount of water supplied to these tens of millions could potentially spell slow disaster. At the same time, however, Ethiopia desperately needs water from the Nile in order to provide sustainable energy for its citizens. 

 

The Nile has been a source of life and energy for thousands of years in an oppressively hot, dry place. The ancient Egyptians counted on the Nile to flood every year so that they would have arable land and used the large river to irrigate their farmland. It is almost ironic, therefore, that Egyptians are once again counting on the water of the Nile to help them survive in such a harsh climate. It seems that the Nile is one of those natural geographic features that is pivotal to political, economic, and social wellbeing. It represents the nexus between natural landforms and the political and economic goals of human beings and nations. Dispute over use of the Nile as a natural and life-giving resource is not the first instance of human debate over possession or use of natural geography and it likely won't be the last. 

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 31, 2016 11:57 AM

85% of the Nile's water comes from the Blue Nile that originates in the Ethiopian highlands--it is the Blue Nile that Ethiopia has been working on damming since 2011.  The Grand Ethiopia Renaissance Dam (GERD) will be located near the border with Sudan (see in Google Maps).  Prior to this trilateral agreement, Egypt and Sudan received the majority of the Nile's waters because of outdated colonial-era treaties that ignored upstream riparian states.  This explains why in the past, Egypt was so adamantly opposed to Ethiopia's plan fearing that their water supply with be threatened.  Today though, the Egyptian President said, "We have chosen cooperation, and to trust one another for the sake of development."  


Tags: Ethiopia, Africa, supranationalism, political, development, environment, water, energy, borders.

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Timeline of the Breakup of Yugoslavia

Map animation depicting the break up of Yugoslavia through the series of political upheavals and conflicts that occurred from the early 1990's onwards. Different areas of control are colour coded.

 

Tags: devolution, historical, political, states, borders, political, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia.


Via Seth Dixon, Dean Haakenson
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Photographs: 22+ International Borders Around The World

Photographs: 22+ International Borders Around The World | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
History (and sometimes, unfortunately, current events) shows us just how easily national borders can change, but we still like to think that they are permanent fixtures. These photos of different national borders around the world show you how both friendly and hostile nations like to fence off their turf.

Via Mr. David Burton
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