AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
7.9K views | +0 today
Follow
AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Jackalopes Return to Yellowstone Ecosystem

Jackalopes Return to Yellowstone Ecosystem | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
After a 93 year hiatus, the elusive Jackalope has returned to the greater Yellowstone ecosystem! These beautiful, yet frightening, creatures were once widely collected by tourists, but better management practices have allowed a re-introduced pack to thrive again. These guys have been sporadically spotted all around the west, including Wyoming, Montana, Colorado, and New Mexico. Idaho allowed a “shoot on sight” policy for jackalopes, so they have not been seen there in quite a while.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 29, 2016 1:16 PM

Long live the Jackalope!!  May the majestic creature once again flourish in the West. 

 

Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, fun.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Sargasso Sea

"The Sargasso Sea occupies almost two thirds of the North Atlantic Ocean. Within this sea, circling ocean currents accumulate mats of Sargassum seaweed that shelter a surprising variety of fishes, snails, crabs, and other small animals. The animal community today is much less diverse than it was in the early 1970s, when the last detailed studies were completed in this region. This study shows that animal communities in the Sargasso Sea are definitely changing. The next step is to find out why."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 2017 9:58 AM

Often, we define oceans and seas based on their borders with land as their defining characteristics (this is one reason why many don't know about the Southern Ocean as a distinct body of water or consider it an ocean). The Sargasso Sea is defined by ocean currents; it is surrounded by great currents but is itself without a strong current, making it perilous for early seafarers.  These oceanic doldrums became shrouded in superstition as stories of the fabled Bermuda Triangle spread, but the truth is all in the ocean currents.   

 

Tags: water, biogeography, environment, physical.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, January 22, 2017 7:38 PM
Geography Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends, Interrelationships
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Whale's Tail

The Whale's Tail | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The Ballena Marine National Park is located in Puntarenas, at the South Pacific coast of Costa Rica." 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 6, 2016 3:33 PM

This National Park in Costa Rica is a delightful example of many things geographic.  Not only is the local biogeography make this a place famous for whales (ballena in Spanish), but the physical geography also resembles a whale's tail.  This feature is called a tombolo, where a spit connects an island or rock cluster to the mainland. Additionally, there is also a great community of citizen cartographers mapping out this park and the surrounding communities. 

 

Tagsbiogeography, environment, geomorphology, physicalwater, landforms.

Alexander peters's curator insight, October 24, 2016 12:23 PM
This article was about the whale and how they were repopulating and how the whale hunting was banned in the 70s. I think this article was really good because use it talked about whales.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Recovering Intellectual Ancestors

Recovering Intellectual Ancestors | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Andrea Wulf's new book The Invention of Nature reveals the extraordinary life of the visionary German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) and how he created the way we understand nature today. Though almost forgotten today, his name lingers everywhere from the Humboldt Current to the Humboldt penguin. Humboldt was an intrepid explorer and the most famous scientist of his age. Perceiving nature as an interconnected global force, Humboldt discovered similarities between climate zones across the world and predicted human-induced climate change. Wulf traces Humboldt’s influences through the great minds he inspired in revolution, evolution, ecology, conservation, art and literature.  In The Invention of Nature Wulf brings this lost hero to science and the forgotten father of environmentalism back to life."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 19, 2016 4:55 PM

I was glad to find this biography of Alexander von Humboldt.  He has been described as the last great ancient geographer concerned with understanding an eclectic cosmography as well as the first modern geographer. He is honored far and wide throughout Europe and especially  Latin America for his explorations, but given that people are confused as how to categorize him and classify his contributions, today he is under-appreciated.  Geographers need to reclaim his memory and call his extensive, globetrotting work on a wide range of subjects ‘geography.’  Here are more articles and videos on the man that I feel geographers should publicly champion as their intellectual ancestor the way that biologists point to Darwin.  

 

Tags:  historicalbiogeography, book reviews.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Very Great Alexander von Humboldt

The Very Great Alexander von Humboldt | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Prussian naturalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769–1859) is all around us. Yet he is invisible. “Alexander von Humboldt has been largely forgotten in the English-speaking world,” writes Andrea Wulf in her thrilling new biography. “It is almost as though his ideas have become so manifest that the man behind them has disappeared.” Wulf’s book is as much a history of those ideas as it is of the man. The man may be lost but his ideas have never been more alive.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 19, 2016 4:37 PM

Alexander von Humboldt has been described as the last great ancient geographer concerned with understanding an eclectic cosmography as well as the first modern geographer. He is honored far and wide throughout Europe and especially Latin America for his explorations, but given that people are confused as how to categorize him and classify his contributions, today he is under-appreciated.  Geographers need to reclaim his memory and call his extensive, globetrotting work on a wide range of subjects ‘geography.’  Here are more articles and videos on the man that I feel geographers should publicly champion as their intellectual ancestor the way that biologists point to Darwin.   

 

Tags:  historicalbiogeography, book reviews.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, July 17, 2016 2:24 AM
The Very Great Alexander von Humboldt
Matthias Henkel's comment, July 23, 2016 2:45 PM
A Man who is still a Brand
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Cutting Haiti's Forests

The major environmental problem facing Haiti's biodiversity is explained, including video of tree-cutting within a national park.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 24, 2016 3:50 PM

Deforestation does not happen in a vacuum--it occurs in an economic, political, and historical context.  Having successfully staged a slave revolution against France in 1806, they were ostracized from the global community (since the powers that be did not want to see slave rebellions or colonial uprising elsewhere) and were forced to look within for their own energy resources.  The nation's forests were (and still are) converted into charcoal, leading to long-term environmental problems such as soil erosion, flooding, and habitat destruction for many species.  All of this increased  increased Haiti's disaster vulnerability in the earthquake of 2010.     

 

Tags: Haiti, biogeography, environmentecology, video, poverty, development, economic, labor.

chao pan's curator insight, June 15, 2017 6:50 PM

a good video to show how human activity negatively impacts the ecosystem. I will use this video in phase three

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Great Barrier Reef was not bleached naturally

The Great Barrier Reef was not bleached naturally | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"This year, we’ve seen alarming bleaching of the Great Barrier Reef, caused by warm sea temperatures. A recently completed aerial survey of the reef found that 93 percent of the smaller reefs that comprise it showed at least some bleaching, and in the northern sector of the reef, the large majority of reefs saw bleaching that was severe — meaning many of these corals could die.  There was already considerable murmuring that this event, which damages a famous World Heritage site and could deal a blow to a highly valuable tourism industry, did not simply happen by chance. And now, a near real-time analysis by a group of Australian climate and coral reef researchers has affirmed that the extremely warm March sea temperatures in the Coral Sea, which are responsible for the event, were hardly natural."

 

Tags: biogeography, environment, ecology, Australia, Oceania.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 2, 5:40 PM
This is an unfortunate example of the impacts of climate change. As water temperatures rise and massive amounts of carbon dioxide and other pollutants acidify our oceans, we will continue to see amazing biological wonders like the Great Barrier Reef become sick and die. This will have very real effects for human populations, too: if this trend of bleaching continues, Australia's ecotourism industry will suffer as people stop coming to visit, hurting the economy. It will also hurt people's livelihoods because as fish and other forms of marine life disappear from the reef, fishermen will no longer find it profitable to try to make their living from the reef.
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, May 3, 1:32 PM
(Oceania) As expected, the warm sea temperature that is killing the Great Barrier Reef is man-made. A new all-time high recorded warmth in the Coral Sea is due to climate change. In fact, scientists found that in simulations, the bleaching of the coral reefs is 175 times more likely under climate change and is only 0.1% likely in a natural climate. However, a strong El Nino in March 2016 also played a part in the destruction of worldwide reefs, in addition to sea temperatures rising dramatically.
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, May 3, 10:30 PM
As the temperature of the sea rises, the great barrier reef has seen some devastating bleaching. Because of its severity, many of these corals, that were once beautiful and pigmented, could die. Researchers have discovered that this rise in temperature is due to humans.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Animals Rule Chernobyl 30 Years After Nuclear Disaster

Animals Rule Chernobyl 30 Years After Nuclear Disaster | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Three decades later, it’s not certain how radiation is affecting wildlife—but it’s clear that animals abound.

 

It may seem strange that Chernobyl, an area known for the deadliest nuclear accident in history, could become a refuge for all kinds of animals—from moose, deer, beaver, and owls to more exotic species like brown bear, lynx, and wolves—but that is exactly what Shkvyria and some other scientists think has happened. Without people hunting them or ruining their habitat, the thinking goes, wildlife is thriving despite high radiation levels.

 

Tags: National Geographic, physical, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, disasters.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

It's official: a global mass extinction is under way

It's official: a global mass extinction is under way | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"New research confirms that the next mass extinction is in progress, and we’re the cause. There’s been little doubt that humans have been severely altering the planet and reducing biodiversity, but it has been unclear how many species go extinct under normal circumstances, without human influence.

This new research clarifies the rate of 'background extinction' (the rate of extinction during the point before humans became a primary contributor to extinction). The research confirms that human activity is driving species extinct at a rate far higher than the background rate. A look at previous events suggests cause for concern. Geologists recognize five previous mass extinction events— the end of the Ordovician, Devonian, Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous periods, meaning that we’re now in the 6th."

 

Tags: physical, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, sustainability, geology.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 28, 2016 7:03 PM

Geographic Thinking Concepts: Patterns and Trends; Interrelationships;

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from SoRo class
Scoop.it!

Skellig Michael: An Island Far, Far Away

Skellig Michael: An Island Far, Far Away | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Star Wars Epiosde VII was filmed on Skellig Michael island in Ireland. What better place to depict an ancient, mystical, martial asceticism in a galaxy far, far away than an actual ancient eremitic settlement, dripping with stone-cold monastic austerity, located at what was for centuries the very ends of the earth, seven miles off the very tip of a western Irish peninsula?"


Via Seth Dixon, Clairelouise
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 2, 2016 12:45 PM

This island is dripping with geologic, biogeographical, and religious intrigue that makes this world heritage site a place that is shrouded in mystery.  This article from JSTOR Daily is a great introduction to the island for the incurably curious.  The already vibrant tourism industry is bound to increase after Star Wars used this incredible location in the recent film (much like New Zealand experienced a huge spike in tourism after the Lord the Rings films).  Filmmakers understand the power of place to deepen the narrative; they frequently situate their stories in a geographic context that will heighten the emotional impact of the story.  For more on the dramatic locations of Star Wars filming sites, see this article by National Geographic

 

Tags: geologybiogeography, religionChristianityplaceIreland, tourism.

J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, January 4, 2016 10:33 AM

Skellig Michael is sure to become a more common geographical interest since the success of Star Wars. 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Living Bridges

"In Northeast India just north of Bangladesh is the province of Meghalaya."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 4:16 PM

I think these bridges are of great value to the world... Nature provides us with such amazing natural resources. There is really no need to do half the damage we do to it. what a beautiful way to keep the environment's natural beauty intacted

 

Kimmy Jay's curator insight, November 20, 2015 6:28 PM

H/E Interaction 

 

Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 21, 12:58 PM
These living bridges are an ingenious way to construct long lasting and incredibly durable bridges in a region of the world that is enormously flood-prone during the monsoon season. These bridges are ideal because they do not crumble like concrete is prone to do and they cannot rust. This is a prime example of people working with the materials available to them to stay connected.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How Wolves Change Rivers

"When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable 'trophic cascade' occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers?"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 6, 2015 11:53 AM

When a complex system gets one aspect of it changed, there are many other changes that occur, some of which are nearly impossible to envision beforehand.  Here is some Oregon State research on the changes in Yellowstone's ecosystems and physical environments since the introduction of wolves. 


Tagsecology, biogeography, environment, environment adapt, physical, fluvial.

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, February 7, 2015 11:56 PM

AMAZING!

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Human Geography is Everything!
Scoop.it!

Alexander von Humboldt

"Have you heard of Alexander von Humboldt? Not likely. The geologist turned geographer and South American explorer was a bit of an 18th century super scientist, traveling over 24,000 miles to understand the relationship between nature and habitat. George Mehler details Humboldt’s major accomplishments and why we should care about them today. See this TED ED lesson plan that accompanies the video."


Via Seth Dixon, Scarpaci Human Geography
more...
Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 6:39 PM

I had not heard of Alexander Von Humbboldt before watching this video. He is said to be one of the most amazing scientists to ever live. More places around the world have been named after him than any other person. His name was lost in history so this is why many people are not familiar with him. He started off as a geologist, then he began a scientific five year journey from 1799-1804. His journey was long, dangerous at some times, and very interesting to hear about. He travel through mountains, across oceans, and through villages. For one thing, he was the first explorer to witness preparation of the curare plant, which was used for poison arrows. He recognized the importance of the cinchona tree, who's bark contains quinine, a malaria killer. He also discovered the ocean current which eliminates rainfall on the coast of Peru. To record air pressure, he climbed to the top of one of the tallest volcanoes, Mount Chimborazo. His total journey consisted of about 2400 miles, which is reality is equal to the circumference of the Earth.

Danielle Lip's curator insight, February 10, 2015 8:42 PM

This video was quite interesting because I had never heard of Alexander von Humboldt, yet this great scientist founded many different important facts that are beneficial and helped to find with the preparation of the Curare Plant which is in poisonous arrows and discovered the ocean current on South America. Without Humboldt South America might have been at a lose for some objects and geographical information. Everyone has an impact in geography and geology, yet Humboldt helped to create contour maps which happened different patterns, everyone builds off of others ideas. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 5, 2015 3:58 PM

Nope, never heard of him.  Humboldt did some extraordinary things though.  I'm surprised we don't hear more about him in education.  I've definitely heard of Darwin though.  It's interesting what we decide is relevant or who is relevant in history.  

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Jackalopes Return to Yellowstone Ecosystem

Jackalopes Return to Yellowstone Ecosystem | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
After a 93 year hiatus, the elusive Jackalope has returned to the greater Yellowstone ecosystem! These beautiful, yet frightening, creatures were once widely collected by tourists, but better management practices have allowed a re-introduced pack to thrive again. These guys have been sporadically spotted all around the west, including Wyoming, Montana, Colorado, and New Mexico. Idaho allowed a “shoot on sight” policy for jackalopes, so they have not been seen there in quite a while.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 29, 2016 1:16 PM

Long live the Jackalope!!  May the majestic creature once again flourish in the West. 

 

Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, fun.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Skokomish River salmon cross the road

"Watch salmon race across the road on their way to spawn; for more footage, watch this extended version."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 16, 2016 9:57 AM

We often see examples of how human modifications to ecosystems or watersheds have devastatingly negative impacts.  This is a remarkable example from Washington's Olympic Peninsula that shows the resiliency of natural systems to overcome human modifications to the physical landscape.  If you study the world, you will always have something to both amaze and surprise you.   

 

Tagsfluvial, biogeography, environment, geomorphology, physicalwater, environment adapt, environment modify.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 17, 2016 11:45 PM

Sometimes the natural world finds ways to adapt to human environmental changes. 

Useful when studying inland water / rivers for the option study. 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Real Reason Leaves Change Color In the Fall

Tags: environment, biogeography.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Africa’s Charcoal Economy Is Cooking. The Trees Are Paying.

Africa’s Charcoal Economy Is Cooking. The Trees Are Paying. | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In Madagascar, the booming charcoal business is contributing to deforestation and may exacerbate the effects of global warming.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Launceston College Geography's curator insight, June 13, 2017 9:51 PM

Deforestation drivers

Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 9, 2017 9:41 AM
If we know that furthering education and economic opportunities will help alleviate the problems present here, why aren't we as a planet seeing that they are implemented? 
brielle blais's curator insight, May 1, 10:23 PM
Charcoal has become the unlikely hero of the informal economy of Africa. This is a positive for the economy. However, this is not a positive for the environment. Deforestation has become a large issue since the boom of more people using charcoal. This will speed up the issue of climate change. This post shows the negative and positives a product can have involving geography.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from education
Scoop.it!

How Geospatial Analytics Are Changing Habitat Conservation

"The BirdReturns program is an effort to provide 'pop-up habitats' for some of the millions of shorebirds, such as sandpipers and plovers that migrate along the Pacific Flyway, a route that spans from Alaska to South America. Birds flying on this journey seek out the increasingly rare wetlands teeming with tasty insects to fuel their long-distance flights.  Over the last century, California's Central Valley has lost 95% of the wetlands habitat to development, agriculture, and other land use changes. As a solution, scientists use big data, binoculars, and rice paddies."


Via Seth Dixon, LEONARDO WILD
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 17, 2016 4:35 PM

This project combines data from satellite imagery to map surface water in California's Central Valley, and individual bird observations to select locations that can be temporarily converted into wetlands to aid the migratory birds (for more information than the video provides about this project, read this article). 

 

This is a great example of using both 'big' geospatial data as represented by the satellite imagery and combining it with field data and actual observations to make the world a better place.  We need more decision makers that can think spatially and use geographic skills.  

 

Tags: physicalCalifornia, water, environmentbiogeography, remote sensing.

Matt Manish's curator insight, May 4, 12:51 AM
Many bird species migrate North from South America up to Alaska when the weather changes and becomes warmer. Many birds like the birds in this video use wet lands along the way of their migration route to stop and rest. Unfortunately, many wet lands along the West coast have dried up due to farming or drought. Fortunately, pop up wet lands are being created along the migration route for birds to use to stop and rest. Some farmers are being paid to flood their land in order to create a temporary wet land for birds. This is not only nice for the birds, but also for the farmers who get paid to flood their land.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Vultures, Environment, and Mapping Trash

"For generations we vultures, armed with our senses, have fought in silence. We’ve waged a battle against garbage, but now we’re losing that battle. We want to help humans, so we’ve launched a movement to help you detect piles of garbage so that you can take action to eliminate them. Join us in this fight. Vultures Warn, you take action!"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 2016 4:24 PM

This video is an introduction to a fascinating (Spanish language) website and project that uses GPS-tagged vultures to map out the urban trash hot-spots in Lima, Peru.  We look at vultures as the dregs of the food chain and ascribe moral filthiness to the species (just think of any number of movie, literary, and cultural references), but they are simply filling an ecological niche.  This mapping project is a way to use vultures nature in a way that allows for humanity to fix our trash production/disposal problems.    

 

Tagspollution, PerudevelopmentmappingGPSbiogeography, environment, environment modify, South America, land use, megacities, urban ecology, consumption.

 

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

von Humboldt: The Invention of Nature

"Andrea Wulf's new book The Invention of Nature reveals the extraordinary life of the visionary German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) and how he created the way we understand nature today. Though almost forgotten today, his name lingers everywhere from the Humboldt Current to the Humboldt penguin. Humboldt was an intrepid explorer and the most famous scientist of his age. Perceiving nature as an interconnected global force, Humboldt discovered similarities between climate zones across the world and predicted human-induced climate change. Wulf traces Humboldt’s influences through the great minds he inspired in revolution, evolution, ecology, conservation, art and literature.  In The Invention of Nature Wulf brings this lost hero to science and the forgotten father of environmentalism back to life."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 19, 2016 4:30 PM

Alexander von Humboldt has been described as the last great ancient geographer concerned with understanding an eclectic cosmography as well as the first modern geographer. He is honored far and wide throughout Europe and especially  Latin America for his explorations, but given that people are confused as how to categorize him and classify his contributions, today he is under-appreciated.  Geographers need to reclaim his memory and call his extensive, globetrotting work on a wide range of subjects ‘geography.’  Here are more articles and videos on the man that I feel geographers should publicly champion as their intellectual ancestor the way that biologists point to Darwin.  

 

Tags:  historicalbiogeography, book reviews.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Animals Rule Chernobyl 30 Years After Nuclear Disaster

Animals Rule Chernobyl 30 Years After Nuclear Disaster | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Three decades later, it’s not certain how radiation is affecting wildlife—but it’s clear that animals abound.

 

It may seem strange that Chernobyl, an area known for the deadliest nuclear accident in history, could become a refuge for all kinds of animals—from moose, deer, beaver, and owls to more exotic species like brown bear, lynx, and wolves—but that is exactly what Shkvyria and some other scientists think has happened. Without people hunting them or ruining their habitat, the thinking goes, wildlife is thriving despite high radiation levels.

 

Tags: National Geographic, physical, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, disasters.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from The Geography of Mexico
Scoop.it!

Revisiting Alexander von Humboldt

Revisiting Alexander von Humboldt | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
On why a Prussian scientific visionary should be studied afresh…In a superb biography, Andrea Wulf makes an inspired case for Alexander von Humboldt to be considered the greatest scientist of the 19th century. Certainly he was the last great polymath in a scientific world which, by the time he died in Berlin in 1859, aged 89, was fast hardening into the narrow specializations that typify science to this day. Yet in the English-speaking world, Humboldt is strangely little-known.

Via Seth Dixon, Tony Burton
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 10, 2015 8:28 AM

Alexander von Humboldt has been described as the last great ancient geographer concerned with understanding an eclectic cosmography as well as the first modern geographer. He is honored far and wide throughout Europe and especially  Latin America for his explorations, but given that people are confused as how to categorize him and classify his contributions, today he is under-appreciated.  Geographers need to reclaim his memory and call his extensive, globetrotting work on a wide range of subjects ‘geography.’  Here is another article and TED-ED video on the most influential scientist that you might not have heard of (at least until today).

 

Tags:  historicalbiogeography.

Tony Burton's curator insight, January 29, 2016 11:32 AM

An interesting biography, but, strangely, Ms Wulf almost completely ignores Humboldt's time in Mexico. In some ways, his time in Mexico was more pivotal in terms of geography than his time in South America. Claiming that Humboldt is a virtual unknown in Europe is a gross distortion of the facts; there have been numerous books about Humboldt over the last thirty to forty years, let alone before that time!.

Pieter de Paauw's curator insight, February 15, 2016 6:25 AM

De nieuwe methode van de onderbouw: (Alexander von) Humboldt

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Galapagos Islands and Biodiversity

Galapagos Islands and Biodiversity | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Radiolab wraps 2015 with a series of special episodes.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 5, 2016 2:11 PM

The Galapagos Islands (as are most islands) filled with remarkably distinct species from the mainland--one of the key reasons that the island were so instrumental in shaping Charles Darwin's thinking about evolution.  This environmental Radiolab podcast is mainly about the Galapagos wildlife and it's conservation and covers many important biogeographic concepts (with time in the episode): 

  • Traveling to the Galapagos (5:25)
  • Who will fight to protect the environment? (10:00)
  • Tortoises and their role in habitats (13:30)
  • Invasive Species and goats (16:30)
  • Removal of Invasive species (19:00)
  • The return of the original habitat (25:40)
  • Local anger against conservation (26:30)
  • 'Restoring' extinct tortoise species (30:00)
  • How do we best protect nature? (37:00)
  • Genetically engineering extinct species (41:00)
  • Tourism and ecological change (46:45)
  • Darwin and finches (50:00)
  • Endangered finches and flies (55:00)
  • Hybrid species (1:02:00)

 

Tags: Ecuador, biogeography, environmentecology, historical.

Marianne Naughton's curator insight, January 14, 2016 1:33 PM

Wildlife & Conservation

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The World’s Driest Desert Is in Breathtaking Bloom

The World’s Driest Desert Is in Breathtaking Bloom | AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL  STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"After historic rains, Atacama, Chile is exploding with vibrant wildflowers.  Here's a softer side to the disruptive weather phenomenon known as El Nino: an enormous blanket of colorful flowers has carpeted Chile's Atacama desert, the most arid in the world. The cyclical warming of the central Pacific may be causing droughts and floods in various parts of the world, but in the vast desert of northern Chile it has also caused a vibrant explosion of thousands of species of flowers with an intensity not seen in decades."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Taylor Doonan's curator insight, February 9, 3:03 PM
These flowers are a once in a lifetime view. Chile's Atacama Desert is known as the driest place on earth, but in 2015 the region got two inches of rainfall. 2 inches to most parts of South America is  not that much rain, but the 2 inches overwhelmed the region, rivers flooded and these flowers that hadn't been seen in decades bloomed. Amid all the tragedy and violence that goes on in South America it is nice to see something so beautiful. 
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, February 13, 8:50 PM
This article truly shows just how beautiful mother nature is. Even in the driest place on the planet, plants come to life when they absorb even the slightest amount of rainfall. Because of the rare precipitation that occurred in Chile's Atacama Desert, wildflowers began to bloom in a place that is normally desolate and colorless.
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, February 20, 9:52 PM
(South America) Plant life has boomed in the Atacama Desert in Chile, the driest place in the world with 0.2 inches of rain a year. 2 inches of rain in March 2015 led to the flooding of river banks and long dormant wildflower seeds bloomed with the moisture. This excitingly rare moment led to thousands of tourists who hopefully had little effect on the natural beauty.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What would happen if humans became extinct?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 6, 2014 4:37 PM

What would Earth be like if all humans suddenly disappeared? This question posed on the YouTube series Earth Unplugged, has many intriguing ecological and biogeographic ramifications that are worth considering to explore how systems are interconnected. 


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, video.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 10:29 AM

I find this youtube video interesting but for sure, the planet has become very interconnected with humans but that has not been a postiive effect. Humans have done nothing but manipulate the natural order of the ecosystem. If humans went extinct I would assume the earth would balance its self out.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, January 27, 2015 7:50 PM

It is funny because this video just made me think about TV shows such as The Walking Dead and Z-Nation.  Of course, not for the zombies, but what if some disease might wipe out the human race, and also how the earth will looks like after human extinction. The impact on earth when human life is gone will be catastrophic for domestic animals left behind. The wild animals will become dominant. Many species will also become extinct and a lot of chemicals will poison grounds and infrastructure will collapse with the force of the weather after few years. Although, it is fascinating how humans can preamble the fact that satellite can be worked forever after humans are gone from Earth. It is not only about humans, but also about the Earth that we need to come up with more reasons to be green on the planet.