Human Biology
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Cells to Civilizations, by Enrico Coen – review

Cells to Civilizations, by Enrico Coen – review | Human Biology | Scoop.it
Coen is attempting something few have dared to – you could call it the unification of life, from biochemistry to human creativity
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Bloodsucking lice reveal clues to human evolution - NBCNews.com

Bloodsucking lice reveal clues to human evolution - NBCNews.com | Human Biology | Scoop.it
Bloodsucking lice reveal clues to human evolution
NBCNews.com
GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Clues to human evolution generally come from fossils left by ancestors and the molecular trail encoded in the human genome as it is tweaked over generations.
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Skull of Homo erectus throws story of human evolution into disarray | TheGuardian.com

Skull of Homo erectus throws story of human evolution into disarray | TheGuardian.com | Human Biology | Scoop.it

The spectacular fossilised skull of an ancient human ancestor that died nearly two million years ago has forced scientists to rethink the story of early human evolution.

 

Anthropologists unearthed the skull at a site in Dmanisi, a small town in southern Georgia, where other remains of human ancestors, simple stone tools and long-extinct animals have been dated to 1.8m years old.

 

Experts believe the skull is one of the most important fossil finds to date, but it has proved as controversial as it is stunning. Analysis of the skull and other remains at Dmanisi suggests that scientists have been too ready to name separate species of human ancestors in Africa. Many of those species may now have to be wiped from the textbooks.

 

The latest fossil is the only intact skull ever found of a human ancestor that lived in the early Pleistocene, when our predecessors first walked out of Africa. The skull adds to a haul of bones recovered from Dmanisi that belong to five individuals, most likely an elderly male, two other adult males, a young female and a juvenile of unknown sex.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Is this the stomach-turning truth about what the Neanderthals ate?

Is this the stomach-turning truth about what the Neanderthals ate? | Human Biology | Scoop.it
The idea of these early humans being plant-eating, self-medicating sophisticates has been brought into question, writes Robin McKie
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How Climate Change and Plate Tectonics Shaped Human Evolution: Scientific American

How Climate Change and Plate Tectonics Shaped Human Evolution: Scientific American | Human Biology | Scoop.it
A new study links the emergence of new hominin species, expanding brain capacity and early human migration with the appearance of deep freshwater lakes

Via SustainOurEarth
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