HSIE Stage 3 - Financial Literacy
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HSIE Stage 3 - Financial Literacy
HSIE Stage 3 - Financial Literacy
SSS3.7 Describes how Australian people, systems and communities are globally interconnected and recognises global responsibilities
Curated by Danielle Cefai
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World Vision

World Vision | HSIE Stage 3 - Financial Literacy | Scoop.it
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Danielle Cefai's comment, April 22, 2013 8:07 PM
This video is an engaging and useful way for introducing a global perspective to the topic of financial literacy. World Vision, being a strong advocate for fair trade, in this specific video advertising the 40 hour famine, focuses on the price of a cup of coffee and uses the simplistic notion of a string to connect all partners involved in the contribution of making that $3 cup of coffee. This resource is a clear demonstration of the world’s interconnectedness and how our decisions on what and where we spend our money on here, in Australia, can impact those of the other side of the world.
To further explore the student’s understanding s and feelings towards the issue, after viewing the film, students can contribute to the creation of a still image (Ewing & Simons, 2004, p.27) holding onto a string as depicted in the video. Students at the bottom representing the split cup of coffee can express why they have fallen and students on the opposite end representing the producers of the product can explain whether or not they think it is fair, and why they have tugged the string, evidently making the coffee spill. After this physical representation and brainstorm of ideas, students can write a discussion exploring the question “Do children need to know about where the money of products go?” based on what they viewed in the video. This introduces a literacy link developing a student’s ability to communicate their opinions and ideas in written language as well as verbal. Selected students with varied responses then can read their work out to the class to share and discuss opinions and reasoning.
Assessment of a student’s understanding of the topic will be evident through their writing which expresses their concerns and views due to the nature of the text type. Furthermore, through observation (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.126) of student contribution and involvement in the discussion will indicate the impact this global concept will have had on students. This provides the teacher with an opportunity to give feedback and supportive comments on the views students have expressed.
Danielle Cefai's comment, April 22, 2013 8:07 PM
References:
Ewing, R. & Simons, J. 2004. Beyond the script: Drama in the classroom. Take 2. 2nd ed. Sydney: PETA.
Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage Learning Australia Pty Limited.
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School Economics

School Economics | HSIE Stage 3 - Financial Literacy | Scoop.it
You might have missed it but over the summer holidays there was a big announcement that affects all primary school kids. The government says you're all going to be studying economics lessons.
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Danielle Cefai's comment, April 22, 2013 11:04 PM
This video is an excellent report on the introduction of learning economics in the primary school setting. The Behind The News (BTN) News report is directed at primary aged students introducing the question of necessity in learning how to handle your own finances. The report talks about bigger financial issues and indicates the perception of younger students in school learning about financial literacy earlier on, which will create a future of informed citizens with enough knowledge to keep them afloat, in regards to how they handle their own money.
Teachers can use this video as an engaging way to introduce the concept of financial literacy, posing the students with more questions than answers as to the importance of learning about earning, saving and spending money. In order to conduct a directed discussion about the topic and how students can use the skills and knowledge they will learn in the real world, students can participate in a hat parade of knowledge, where Debono’s thinking hats (De Bono, 1999) are the central theme, allowing a varied discussion about a number of different elements, analysing and assessing the video they would have just watched. Teachers can focus on a particular hat to lead the lesson in a certain direction. In the case that the red hat is the focus (emotion), students can conduct interviews with fellow classmates and film the session (dress ups/costumes etc can be incorporated to make activity more engaging for students). The interview will encompass questions about learning about money and what they think about it, in particular how they feel about the introduction to learning economics. All interviews will be collated and made into a documentary about “Why learn about money?” through the use of windows movie maker and can be viewed as a class on the smartboard. Students can watch documentary through a first time for enjoyment and then a second time through to note down the different feelings involved on the topic.
Group work (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, pp. 137-138) in this case can be used as a form assessment as watching their peers being interviewed will allow students the opportunity to reflect and provide feedback. This task will put all thoughts, feelings and possible anxieties out in the clear for discussion and reflection which are useful to address at the commencement of the unit. A similar activity can then be drawn on at the end of the unit to compare and contrast responses and display the development and progress which has been made in the subject area. Reflections can also be written into learning journals to embed a stronger literacy link to the learning task.
Danielle Cefai's comment, April 22, 2013 11:04 PM
References:
De Bono, E., & Markland, J. (1999). Six thinking hats (Vol. 192). New York^ eNY NY: Back Bay Books.
Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage Learning Australia Pty Limited.
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makingcentscalculating.pdf

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Danielle Cefai's comment, April 23, 2013 1:07 AM
This resource is a unit of work in PDF format made available to all teachers through the making cents website http://www.makingcents.com.au/ which entails on financial resources for parents and teachers, appropriate across all stages. This resource in particular is a document suitable for stage three students with many sub sections, broken down into useful lessons which can be taken straight out and used in the classroom or modified to suit the needs of your class. The sub-topics covered include; money as a resource, financial responsibilities, using a transaction account, financial sources and resources, and after the build up of skills and knowledge these lessons are designed to provide, students can work through the final section titled ‘the main event’. This allows students to put their knowledge into practice as they take part in organising and running a fundraising event at their school. Students could pick a universal theme such as multicultural day, a rainbow theme or even a sports day where events and donations are involved in raising money for a school program. To connect with communities outside the school students could choose an organisation contextually appropriate to their own school community. A specific example of such is raising money for the Autism Spectrum Australia to support students with Austim.
Their ability to successfully organise and run the event would form as ongoing assessment as observation and achievement of smaller goals in the process will determine competency, as well as the overall success. There are many imbedded mathematics components within these teaching activities as outlined in the PDF which work hand in hand with the nature of Financial Literacy. Maths games that are explained are detailed in such a way that teachers can introduce concepts to students sequentially to help construct and solidify mathematical understanding before testing proficiency in real life situations. This supports the notion of Constructivism (McInerney & McInerney, 2010) whereby educational psychologists describe the efficiency and effectiveness of a progressive build on knowledge to ensure students establish and create greater meaning in their memory or concepts and ideas.
Danielle Cefai's comment, April 23, 2013 1:08 AM
References:
McInerney, D. M., & McInerney, V. (2010). Piaget, Vygotsky, Constructivism and effective learning. Educational Psychology Constructing Learning. (5th ed.). (pp. 54-55). Australia: Pearson.
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Aboriginal Technology - Learning Sequence 6

Aboriginal Technology - Learning Sequence 6 | HSIE Stage 3 - Financial Literacy | Scoop.it
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Danielle Cefai's comment, April 22, 2013 8:59 PM
Learning sequence 6 is one part of a series of lessons which have been developed by the NSW Board of Studies, as a part of their K-6 Linkages project. This specific learning sequence is a quality resource with an imbedded Indigenous Australian perspective, where students learn about trade being a traditional Aboriginal Australian practice to exchange things of need. When learning about financial literacy and how communities are connected by monetary systems it is vital for teachers to delve deeper into the traditional history of our land and ensure students develop and understanding of broader cultural practices in regards to the exchange of money for goods of want or need. Furthermore it must be noted that this resource was chosen within the boundaries of the Selection Criteria for the Evaluation of Aboriginal Studies and Torres Strait Islander Studies, addressing the areas of authenticity, accuracy, balanced nature of content and the participation of Indigenous Australians in the construction of the content.
Teachers can use this lesson sequence with direct application in the classroom or choose particular activities from the sequence to integrate for the inclusion of an Indigenous perspective. “Reading 1” in particular introduces trading and the particular items which were commonly traded in traditional Aboriginal Australian culture. Students can participate in a trading game where they cut out items from the activity cards supplied with this digital resource and trade them for classroom goods such as glue sticks, pencils and rubbers. After trading game, teachers can immerse students in discussion as guided by the questions listed on the site which explore the purpose of trading. Incorporating a literacy component to the learning sequence, students then compose a recount reporting on their trading experience. The evaluative nature of this task reflects Anderson’s Revised Taxonomy (Wilson, 2006) as students are synthesising their understanding through the activities they have taken part in.
Assessment of student learning will derive from the teacher’s observations (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.126) of students’ participation and quality of written work. The recount writing however, serves as the main form of assessment as concrete evidence providing insight into the students’ comprehension of the lesson.
Danielle Cefai's comment, April 22, 2013 9:00 PM
Reference
Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage Learning Australia Pty Limited.
Wilson, L. O. (2006). Beyond Bloom - A new Version of the Cognitive Taxonomy. Retrieved from Dr. Leslie Owen Wilson's Curriculum Pages: http://www4.uwsp.edu/education/lwilson/curric/newtaxonomy.htm
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Coinland - Teaching kids about money with the Commonwealth Bank

Building on the Commonwealth Banks commitment to improve the financial literacy of one million Australian children by 2015. The Commonwealth Bank has launche...
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Danielle Cefai's comment, April 22, 2013 11:55 PM
The Commonwealth bank have created an online game called “Coinland” which is targeted at primary aged children, with the goal to teach and improve their financial literacy. The game is a virtual land where coins can be earned by finding jobs in the daily newspaper and introduces the use of financial terminology with options to then save and deposit coins in the bank. This game is an engaging way for students to put what they learn about personal finance into practice.
This online game can be used within a lesson to introduce the notion of saving for desired items, but in regards to the use as a classroom resource, may be most beneficial as used within a rewards system during either just HSIE allocated time or after general class activities are completed as well. Within the topic of financial literacy, students will learn about buying items they need and want, and needing to save their money to reach these goals. This theoretical work will build a foundation of knowledge for students in understanding an effective way to handle money but in some cases students won’t be able to put this theory into practice immediately in the real world outside of the classroom restraints. Allowing students to play the coinland game provides all with an equal opportunity for practical application in a controlled online learning environment (Marsh, 2010, pp. 210-211). Once all students have had a fair amount to play the game and earn and spend coins, the class can construct a graph, mapping data of how much each student has saved in the coin bank and compare amounts amongst the class. This can lead to the discussion as to why some students will have more or less than others and what they have purchased or how much they have worked to influence their savings. This integrates a Mathematics strategy into the lesson whilst also assessing the student’s ability to save their money and balance spending and earning amounts. The teacher can also set a goal for students to try and save X amount by a particular date and then assess who was able to manage their finances to do so. Therefore assessment is summative in nature (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, pp. 124-125), whilst also having students self reflect on the process of reaching the desired goal, or falling short in some cases.
Danielle Cefai's comment, April 22, 2013 11:55 PM
References:
Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage Learning Australia Pty Limited.
Marsh, C. J. (2010). Becoming a Teacher: Knowledge, Skills and Issues (Vol. 5). Frenchs Forest: Pearson Australia.