HSIE Stage 2: Technology and how it changes our lives
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Behind the News: Digital Footprint

Behind the News: Digital Footprint | HSIE Stage 2: Technology and how it changes our lives | Scoop.it
Imagine if someone was following your every move no matter where you went, or what you did. It would be pretty scary but if you think about it it's not so different to the world we live in. Whether it's the information we share on the internet or our day to day activities. We leave traces of ourselves everywhere. Matt explains.
Hayley Chan's insight:

This video considers the role modern technology plays in our everyday lives and its effects on our lifestyles and environments, addressing key stage 2 outcomes and subject matter (SSS2.7) (see Board of Studies NSW, 2007, pp.54-55). Modern communication technologies such as the Internet, mobile phones and social media websites are specifically addressed. The video likens the nature of these technologies to someone ‘following your every move’. Key terms such as ‘digital footprint’ and ‘online privacy’ are introduced, defined and assessed for their benefits and shortcomings. Other unfamiliar vocabulary is also introduced such as ‘hacker’, ‘online network’, ‘security camera’ and ‘credit cards’. The video considers the pros and cons of modern technology and provides students with advice about how they can minimise their ‘digital footprint’ and be responsible online. Importantly, this video relates technological change to students’ everyday lives, creating a real, authentic and meaningful learning experience, which should entice and motivate learning (Mishra & Koehler, 2006, p.1034).

 

In small groups or as a class, students could consider the meaning of the key terms and vocabulary introduced such as ‘digital footprint’, ‘online privacy’, ‘hacker’ etc. For example, in groups, students could create a mindmap of the concept of ‘digital footprint’, defining it and noting its pros and cons. As an individual activity, students could represent (in drawing or writing) how they use the Internet i.e. the websites they use, and how often they use them. Teachers should reiterate the point made in the video regarding being safe and responsible online. This new information could be consolidated in a whole class activity where students are encouraged to formulate ‘rules’ about being responsible online. Thus this resource could potentially be used to address English outcomes and ICT capabilities (Board of Studies, 2012, p.95; Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p.7).

 

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2007). Human Society and its Environment K-6. Australia: Board of studies NSW.

 

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2012). English K-10 Syllabus, Volume 1: English K-6. Australia: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Gilbert, R., and Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences: History, Geography, Economics and Citizenship in the Australian Curriculum. Melbourne: Cengage Learning.

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Globalisation: How we are connected

Globalisation: How we are connected | HSIE Stage 2: Technology and how it changes our lives | Scoop.it
Hayley Chan's insight:

This learning and teaching resource portrays a global perspective of technological change and its impact upon lifestyles and environments. It specifically addresses Australia’s relationship with other nations by means of trade, international organisations, communications, technology, sport and education. All this information is cleverly juxtaposed on a world map, where image and text placement are thoughtfully placed and refer to each adjacent country.

 

This resource also provides learning activities for students, which are twofold. The first activity asks students to identify items at home and school that are made overseas under the following headings: clothing, toys, furniture, whitegoods, books etc. The second activity asks students to make a concept map with the aid of a blank world map (provided in this resource) and demonstrate their worldwide connections by means of travel, family, friends etc.

 

As an extension to the aforementioned activities, as a class or in groups, students could gather their findings under country headings ensuring the items are categorised (i.e. whitegoods, toys, electronics). Then, this information could be displayed in graph form (e.g. histogram). This would make it easier for students to observe patterns in different countries and the kinds of items they manufacture. These activities would satisfy stage 2 outcomes in the English and Mathematics syllabus, as students use new vocabulary and display information in graphic form (Board of Studies NSW, 2012a, p.95; Board of Studies NSW, 2012b, p. 182).

 

Thus, this resource is a simple yet effective means to engage students in classroom discussion, where students are encouraged to consider how they themselves are connected in the global community by means of interdependence and international connections. Global perspectives in education are vitally important as they foster open-mindedness, understandings of intercultural diversity, interdependence and cultural identities. It is hoped these understandings will enable young people to be proactive in society and promote future positive relationships with other nations (Global Perspectives, 2011, p.2).

 

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2012a). English K-10 Syllabus, Volume 1: English K-6. Australia: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2012b). Mathematics K-10 Syllabus, Volume 1: Mathematics K-6. Australia: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Global Perspectives: A Framework for Global Education in Australian Schools. (2011). Australia: Education Services Australia.

 

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Twelve Canoes: The Macassans

Twelve Canoes: The Macassans | HSIE Stage 2: Technology and how it changes our lives | Scoop.it
12 Canoes is a broadband website presenting, in an artistic, cultural and educational context, the stories, art and environment of the Yolngu people who live around the Arafura swamp in north-eastern Arnhem Land.
Hayley Chan's insight:

 The Macassans  provides an indigenous perspective of technological change and its impact on lifestyles and environments. The video, along with others on the site, was developed in consultation with members of the Yolngu community in Arnhem Land (Lewis, n.d., p.4). The Macassans is told from the perspective of a member of this community and combines a series of traditional indigenous artwork and scenes of nature to supplement the story.

 

The video explains the Yolngu people's trading relationship with the Macassans from Indonesia and the impact it had on their lifestyles and communities i.e. they introduced cloth, metal, tobacco, seafaring goods (fishing lines and hooks) and skills (making harpoons, making sails for canoes). It was a peaceful, mutually beneficial relationship that fostered change in both local communities and environments.

 

This learning resource provides an authentic indigenous perspective and as such would allow students to deepen their understanding and effects of technological change in one indigenous community. This resource would also foster understandings of the diversity of indigenous culture and thereby provide a foundation for challenging stereotypical preconceptions or representations in society (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p.355).

 

Therefore, this video would be a good starting point for class discussion, whereby teachers ask students about their prior knowledge of indigenous peoples and technology. Teachers may design activities that compare the nature of Macassan and later European contact in 1788. Stage 2 students should be familiar with British colonisation (CCS2.1) (see Board of Studies NSW, 2007, pp.54-55), thus this would be an appropriate activity that will consolidate and redress prior student knowledge. Students could recount the story in their workbooks, utilising new vocabulary from the video such as 'trade', 'peaceful' and 'seafaring' in order to enrich their vocabulary and meet literacy outcomes in the English syllabus ( Board of Studies NSW, 2012, p.95).

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2007). Human Society and its Environment K-6. Australia: Board of studies NSW.

 

 Board of Studies NSW. (2012). English K-10 Syllabus, Volume 1: English K-6. Australia: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Lewis, R. (n.d.). Twelve Canoes: A Study Guide. Retrieved April 10, 2014 from http://www.12canoes.com.au/downloads/studyguide/Twelve_Canoes_Study_Guide.pdf

 

Gilbert, R., and Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences: History, Geography, Economics and Citizenship in the Australian Curriculum. Melbourne: Cengage Learning.

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The Steam Revolution: Teachers exhibition notes

Hayley Chan's insight:

This teaching resource explains the nature of The Steam Revolution exhibition at the Powerhouse museum in Sydney. It provides a clear rationale: that is to explore the development, role and effects of steam technology from its advent in the 1600s to the present day. Further information includes a floorplan, a ‘walkthrough’, making note of installations and themes, and student activities. Thus, this resource provides teachers with all the information required to design learning experiences at the exhibition that address HSIE outcomes, subject matter and individual student abilities and needs.

 

This exhibition also considers the development of Sydney’s water supply from British colonisation to the present day. This topic would probably be more accessible to stage 2 students as they should have some understanding of early Sydney and could easily relate water supply to their everyday lives (CCS2.1) (see Board of Studies NSW, 2007, pp.54-55) Teachers could ask students to consider how they access water and how it differs to people living in Sydney 150 years ago. Students also have the opportunity to engage with an interactive water pump, creating a real world, hands-on experience. This activity could be recorded in their workbooks where students are encouraged to use new vocabulary such as ‘water supply’, and ‘water pump’, thus addressing key English outcomes (see Board of Studies NSW, 2012a, p.95). Students could also construct a timeline based on the information in the water supply installation, applying their notions of chronology and time – a key Mathematics outcome (see Board of Studies NSW, 2012b, p.182).

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2007). Human Society and its Environment K-6. Australia: Board of studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2012a). English K-10 Syllabus, Volume 1: English K-6. Australia: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2012b). Mathematics K-10 Syllabus, Volume 1: Mathematics K-6. Australia: Board of Studies NSW.

 

 

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It didn't always look like this

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This teaching resource provides an array of lesson plans, with links to syllabus outcomes, and student worksheets. The worksheets are simple, yet dynamic and thus can be easily altered according to a diversity student needs and capabilities - an important task that teachers must address (Hollins, 2011, p.397).

 

A particularly useful lesson aims to familiarise students with the quarrying process: including key terminology, its development over time, and the effects it has wrought upon the environment and people living within the community (Matthews et al., 1999, p.14). Worksheets are designed to consolidate student learning and vary from informational texts, diagrams and illustrations – suiting a diversity of learning styles (Matthews et al., 1999, pp.34-37). These learning experiences link directly to a stage 2 outcome and subject matter in the HSIE syllabus, concerning technological change and its impact on lifestyles and environments (Board of Studies NSW, 2007, pp.54-55). 

 

This teaching resource focuses on the Penrith Lakes area in Sydney. Therefore, this resource may be better adopted as a model for designing units of work for local school communities that will be more relevant to students. It is important that teachers ensure that learning experiences are relevant and meaningful to students’ lives as such experiences have been found to encourage motivation and better facilitate learning (Mishra & Koehler, 2006, p. 1034).

 

In adapting this resource, teachers may design activities that encourage students to construct simple timelines based on the factual information presented. Students would be required to select the necessary information and organise it in chronological order. This would address key learning outcomes in English and Maths as students will consolidate key terms and vocabulary and consider the concept of time (Board of Studies NSW, 2012a, p.95; Board of Studies NSW, 2012b, p.105).

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2007). Human Society and its Environment K-6. Australia: Board of studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2012a). English K-10 Syllabus, Volume 1: English K-6. Australia: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2012b). Mathematics K-10 Syllabus, Volume 1: Mathematics K-6. Australia: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Hollins, E. (2011). Teacher Preparation for Quality Teaching. Journal of Teacher Education, 62(4), 395-407.

 

Matthews, G., Rouland, P., Field, S., and Gore, J. (1999). It wasn’t always like this. Retrieved April 9, 2014 from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/primary/hsie/assets/pdf/didntlookunit.pdf

 

Mishra, P. & Koehler, M.J. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College Record, 108(6), 1017-1054.

 

 

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