Teaching Students in Stage 1 about Social Systems and Structures
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Teaching Students in Stage 1 about Social Systems and Structures
Students in stage one will learn about the roles and responsibilities of people who work in services in the community, both paid and unpaid.
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Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Advisory Panel

Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Advisory Panel | Teaching Students in Stage 1 about Social Systems and Structures | Scoop.it

"Council appointed the first City of Sydney Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Panel on 15 December 2008. Made up of community and industry professionals, the panel's members are from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander background and live or work in the local area".

Julie Tea's insight:

Council websites are a great resource to turn to for information on your local community. This website provides an insight into the City of Sydney council, but specifically the City’s Advisory Panel which consists of members who are from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds, who live or work in the area. The panel’s role is to “provide advice on matters of importance to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities”. This page also provides the profiles of the members, what they have accomplished and what they are able to offer their community.

 

While this resource may not be suitable for students in stage one, it is a great resource for teachers in preparation for a class, to address the roles and responsibilities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members. A relevant teaching idea is to encourage students to engage in role-play. “Role play gives participants direct experience with the content of an issue, and provides an opportunity to develop skills such as perspective taking…” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 149). Role-play relevant to this resource can include the students simulating what may happen in an Advisory Panel meeting. Students should be sure to re-enact the meeting from the perspective of the members from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds and establish decisions or actions to be made on behalf of their community. The roles and responsibilities of these members can also be expressed in the simulation and can be drawn from the profiles given on the website.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia. 

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Reef Clean Up in Samoa After Disaster

Reef Clean Up in Samoa After Disaster | Teaching Students in Stage 1 about Social Systems and Structures | Scoop.it

"After a tsunami, Samoan volunteers helped clean up the reef."

Julie Tea's insight:

Please refer to commentary made in post titled "A day spent planting rice seedlings in Laos". 

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Behind the News - 01/03/2011: SES Volunteer

Behind the News - 01/03/2011: SES Volunteer | Teaching Students in Stage 1 about Social Systems and Structures | Scoop.it
Whenever these disasters happen there are lots of people helping out And many of them are volunteers So why do some people feel compelled to give up their time to help others We sent Kirsty to trai
Julie Tea's insight:

On this episode of Behind The News, reporter Kristy Bennett explores what is takes to be a SES volunteer. Kristy discusses the various jobs that State Emergency Service (SES) volunteer workers undertake and also the roles they play during disastrous times. She also participates in a few training courses to demonstrate how to become a member of the SES.

 

A teaching idea based on this video report, for stage one students, could be a video comprehension activity. The teacher should prompt students to take note and list the jobs and roles of SES volunteers as mentioned in the video and think about what service they are providing our community. Students should just watch the video first without note taking but should be wary of the questions. In the second viewing of the video, students should list accordingly, during or after the viewing. The class will then reflect and discuss the roles and responsibilities as a class, with teacher guidance. This should then segue way into a brainstorm about what a volunteer is and how this differs from non-volunteer work. The brainstorm should be demonstrated on a smart/white board and students are encouraged to copy and note. Subsequently, students should be able to identify the difference between paid and unpaid work of services. 

 

This teaching idea not only covers ground in HSIE, but also incorporates literacy skills to enhance the students learning. 

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A Day Spent Planting Rice Seedlings in Laos

A Day Spent Planting Rice Seedlings in Laos | Teaching Students in Stage 1 about Social Systems and Structures | Scoop.it

“A woman spends all day bent over and standing in water to plant rice seedlings in a paddy field in Laos.”

Julie Tea's insight:

The Global Education website is a great resource for teachers to think about integrating global perspectives into their class and specifically their lessons.

 

A teaching idea which can be drawn from this website is to analyse two particular visual stories. The first image is as seen above and second image can be found in post titled “Reef clean up in Samoa after disaster”. After first establishing what the woman is doing in the image and what the men are doing in the second image, the class teacher can prompt students to discuss the roles and responsibilities of each party, as a class. The class teacher can then prompt students to discuss both the roles and responsibilities of each party in the images and continue to question what the consequences may be if these responsibilities were not met by each party. Who would be affected in their community? Role-play can easily be integrated into this activity for more engagement on student behalf. Students can be grouped into two, to demonstrate these consequences. The teacher should also discuss the difference between volunteer work and paid work, as they are comparable in the images. The men in the second image are working as volunteers for their community and are not expecting monetary benefits, but rather the restoration of their homes. The woman on the other hand is working hard to earn a living, prossibly to feed not only herself but her family.

 

These images illustrate a different perspective; it is a global perspective, which is identified in not only a different community, but also a different country. Students should reflect on how these images may show differences or similarities to the roles and responsibilities of paid and unpaid work, which can be found in their own community. 

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Workers In Our Community

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KpuotpfE1bk

 

This video is a demonstration of the song in action and can be shown to students.

Julie Tea's insight:

This online PDF file is resourceful for teachers as it outlines the outcomes that are intended to be met, the values that are targeted and also provides a list of relevant activities. This resource focuses on workers in the community and is based on an educational song called “Workers in the Community”. The lyrics of the song, which are provided, identify particular people who provide services in the community and what it is that they do, both paid and unpaid. This resource also entails a list of suggestions for literacy activities relevant to this topic and song.

 

Among the suggested literacy activities include a collage making activity. Using magazine pictures, students are asked to create a collage of workers in the community and must label each picture. A suggestion I would make is for a follow up activity, once students complete this collage, student should select one of these workers and list their roles and responsibilities. With this in mind, students are prompted to design and make a certificate of appreciation for this member of society and list what they are thankful for (this is where they can then list the responsibilities or roles of the workers). An example would be “Thank you taking away our rubbish” – To a garbage collector. 

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Sesame Street - Who are the people in your neighbourhood?

Sesame Street - Who are the people in your neighbourhood? | Teaching Students in Stage 1 about Social Systems and Structures | Scoop.it
Julie Tea's insight:

This is a great online activity for students in stage one. The website opens with the song “Who are the people in your neighbourhood” and then promptly instructs students to click on any television for Bob (the voiceover) to sing about some of these people and what they do. Once a student selects and clicks on the TV, a video appears while Bob is sings about a few of the roles this particular person has. The video quickly explores a few of the things these people in the neighbourhood do.

           

This activity is a great interactive tool and allows students in stage one to explore the roles and responsibilities of people in their neighbourhood all the while practicing their computer knowledge and skills. This activity is great for students who are auditory learners as it they are able to learn about particular roles and responsibilities through song, the song also quite repetitive and can be easily memorised by young children. Visual learners will also benefit from this online source as it offers a video, which depicts the roles of these particular members of society. This activity is all about active learning (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).

 

At the completion of the activity, the teacher and students can regroup and sing the song as a class and discuss a few more responsibilities or jobs that these people might have that the song didn’t mention. Another suggestion is for students to discuss the consequences if the roles and responsibilities of these service providers are not met.  

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia. 

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