HSIE K-6, Stage 1: Natural-Built-Heritage
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Flickr maps

Flickr maps | HSIE K-6, Stage 1: Natural-Built-Heritage | Scoop.it

Embed Global Perspectives about built/natural environments in your Stage 1 classroom using Flickr maps. 

Bec Isaacs's insight:

 

Flickr maps is a visually-rich, web-based resource that gives Stage 1 students an opportunity to SEE environments in other parts of the world from the comfort of the classroom.

 

The site combines Flickr users’ photos with mapping software that is similar to Google Earth. A search on a particular area, such as 'Vietnam' will return photos taken of or in Vietnam. The site’s tagline, “Explore everyone’s photos on a map,” sums it up quite nicely.

 

The site is user-friendly and aesthetically appealing, which makes it appropriate for young children in Stage 1 classrooms. A user simply needs to type the name of the area they wish to explore in the dialogue box at the top right hand corner, press Enter, and a world of images appears. Clicking on an image will enlarge that image.   

 

I would designate each child in my class one particular country to search. The children would be given time to search the photos linked to this country, pick a favourite photo, print it off, and glue it to this ‘Write-a-story’ template: http://www.studenthandouts.com/01-Web-Pages/Lot-01/Free-Printable-Write-a-Story-Writing-Sheet-for-Kids-with-Picture-Box.html

                                                                                                                     

Each student could compose a written response to the photo with this guiding question in mind:  "Write a few sentences about your photo. Make sure to name the country and tell us about the natural and built features you can see."  

 

I feel the students' responses would provide a great opportunity to assess each child’s understanding of the concepts of built and natural features. 

 

I'd quite like to make colour copies of each students' photo and story, and compile these into a booklet. We could use these booklets as a springboard for reflection and class discussion about natural and built features. 

 

Flickr Maps is a wonderful way to introduce the Global Perspectives cross-curricular priority into the Stage 1 classroom.  Looking at and responding to an array of photos may appear to be a simplistic exercise. However, I believe this activity is a great way for students to begin to respect and value diversity, and become active in the development of a peaceful, just and sustainable world, as per Global Education for the Australian Curriculum.

 

REFERENCES

 

https://www.flickr.com/map

 

Commonwealth of Australia. (2008). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian Schools. Retrieved from http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/global-education/

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Built and Natural Environments

Built and Natural Environments | HSIE K-6, Stage 1: Natural-Built-Heritage | Scoop.it

A fun clip to help students understand the difference between built and natural features/environments. The music adds extra oomph!

Bec Isaacs's insight:

This video clip is a great example of how teachers may use Information Communication Technology (ICT) for “added value” in the classroom. As Gilbert and Hoepper identify, the use of ICT, such as this Teacher Tube video, may “increase the motivation of children to learn.” The mix of pictures and music in a readily available, web-accessible resource is a great example of how ICT can “provide…opportunities for engaging students in learning in new ways, enabling teachers to do things that are not otherwise possible…” See: Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Society and Environment. 5th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

I suspect many Stage 1 children would find this clip exciting and motivating, as it combines an otherwise stock standard set of images of local and different environments, with an exciting sound track. In my classroom, I would encourage children to dance along to this clip, thereby embedding an element of performing arts within the teaching and learning environment.

 

Sydney University academic, Robyn Ewing, is a great advocate of transforming literacy learning through the Arts, and I believe this extends to all curriculum areas. She argues that “all forms of the creative arts,” including dance, “are inextricably linked to our imaginations and involve play, experimentation, exploration…and artistic shaping of the body or other media to bring together emotions as well as personal, sensory and intellectual experiences.” 

 

I agree with Ewing’s claim that embedding the arts in learning can “engage students holistically,” (2010, p. 57) and so believe in the potential of this video to physically imbed students in their learning about different natural and built environments.

 

To consolidate students learning about natural and built features (as per the content descriptor in ENS1.5 and 1.6) I would encourage my students to reflect upon the images shown in the clip. I would encourage class discussion, using guiding questions such as: What different types of built/natural environments did you see? Do you know where any of these pictures were taken? Do any of the pictures show built AND natural features?

 

The excitement of the above video clip encourages a positive view of the interaction of natural and built environments. To introduce Stage 1 students to the flip side – the risk that building poses to nature and the importance of sustainable development –I might also show them this video clip, which uses Google Earth technology to track how urbanization has led to the decimation of the natural environment in India: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=70Rv-Gmzeuk.&nbsp

 

REFERENCES 

 

Ewing, R. (2010) Literacy in the arts in Christie, F. & Simpson, A. (Eds). Literacy and social responsibility: Multiple perspectives. London: Equinox

 

Leebee71087. (2009). Built and natural environments [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=121115

 

Shaikh, S. (2013). Urbanization in India 2003 – 2013 [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=70Rv-Gmzeuk

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Interactive Map | Aboriginal Educational Consultative Group

Interactive Map | Aboriginal Educational Consultative Group | HSIE K-6, Stage 1: Natural-Built-Heritage | Scoop.it

NSW Aboriginal Education Consultative Group Inc.

Bec Isaacs's insight:

This interactive map is a great resource for K-6 HSIE teachers and students looking to implement the 'Aboriginal perspectives' cross-curriculum priority in the classroom.

 

The map is a visual representation of the NSW AECG Regions. Users can click on a particular region to find contact details for the AECG representative in that region. 

 

The NSW AECG is the peak advisory body in NSW to "provide advice and guidance for educators about the delivery of curriculum in schools."

 

Regional and local AECGs will help teachers and students make contact with and get to know their local Aboriginal community. The AECGs will help teachers and students work with the Aboriginal community to develop appropriate teaching and learning activities. 

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Take A Classroom Selfie & Share It With The World

Take A Classroom Selfie & Share It With The World | HSIE K-6, Stage 1: Natural-Built-Heritage | Scoop.it
Take A Classroom Selfie & Share It With The World
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Vaucluse House excursion introduction

Vaucluse House is a heritage property in Sydney's Eastern Suburbs. This set of slides is a simply introduction for school groups who will be visiting the sites. 

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E-book: 'Window' by Jeannie Baker

A great Slideshare version of Jeannie Baker's 'Window.' View in full screen for best effect. 

Bec Isaacs's insight:

This Slideshare version of Jeannie Baker’s Window is a great resource to engage a Stage 1 class in a group ‘reading’ –or more appropriately for this wordless picture book, ‘viewing' -exercise. 

 

The book is composed of thirteen, double-page spreads that juxtapose the growth of a baby boy with the growth of the world outside his window. As time goes by, the once rural environment is populated with built features, showing the long-term effects of human interaction with the natural world. The last page shows the boy as a grown man with his own baby, looking out another window onto a different natural landscape. This suggests that the cycle is ongoing –humans make their mark on one area and then move to then next.

 

I would use a projector or SmartBoard as a communal viewing tool for a Stage 1 classroom. At each double-page spread, I would ask the children what new things they could see and we would end in a class discussion about the relationship between humans and the environment, and the ways in which people interact with nature. I would then set a class or homework task asking each child to draw the view from his/her own window at home and write a descriptive passage about the natural/built features in their immediate area.  

 

Window’s visually rich, mixed media compositions (a beautiful feature of all of Baker’s books) make this a wonderful text to enlarge on a projector or Smartboard. Each detail becomes magnified, each built feature becomes more prominent. Students become immersed in Baker’s pages.

 

As per Mishra and Koehler’s model of technology integration in teaching, using the slides as a teaching and learning tool reveals “thoughtful interweaving…of technology, pedagogy and content” whereby all three components exist in a “state of dynamic equilibrium” (Mishra & Koehler, 2006, p. 1029). It is a great example of the potential offered by Technological pedagogical content knowledge.

 

REFERENCES

 

Baker, J. (1991). Window. Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/MrsJuteau/windows-2992791

 

Mishra, P. & Koehler, M. J. (2006). Technological pedagogical content knowledge: A framework for teacher knowledge. Teachers College Record, 108 (6), 1017-1054.

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Aboriginal Heritage Office

Aboriginal Heritage Office | HSIE K-6, Stage 1: Natural-Built-Heritage | Scoop.it

 

Aboriginal Heritage in the north Sydney area - Lane Cove, Manly, North Sydney, Warringah, Willoughby, Ku-ring-gai, Pittwater, City of Ryde

Bec Isaacs's insight:

The Aboriginal Heritage Office website is the online home of a joint initiative by eight local Sydney councils –Lane Cove, North Sydney, Ku-Rin-Gai, Manly, Pittwater, Warringah, Willoughby and the City of Ryde.

 

The Office works to identify and protect Aboriginal Heritage places, objects and culture in these eight council areas, and provide education to schools and other interested groups about local Aboriginal history and heritage. The website has information about local Aboriginal history and Aboriginal sites, great resources including student-friendly photographs and videos, a useful FAQ, and extensive links to other Aboriginal Heritage organisations and information sites.

 

The AHO website a great online resource for Stage 1 HSIE teachers who would like to:

 

1) Self-educate about Indigenous Heritage in Sydney before developing classroom unit about local aboriginal heritage,

2) make connections with the Heritage Office and begin collaboration on an appropriate Stage 1 education program, including guided walks of local heritage places and objects,

3) Link to the eight local councils, each of which provide specific information about aboriginal heritage in their particular local government area, and

4) Embed an Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) perspective within their classroom curriculum.

 

Study of Indigenous Heritage in Sydney is linked to HSIE syllabus ‘Environments’ outcomes ENS1.5 and ENS1.6, and in particular the mention of “heritage” in the subject matter dot point: “Students will learn about natural, built and heritage features in the immediate environment and other areas.”

 

Using the AHO website as a starting point, Stage 1 HSIE teachers can begin to develop classroom activities to engage students with the concept of heritage, whilst also addressing the ‘Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures’ cross-curriculum priority.

 

A teacher’s utilisation of the AHO website is a great example of Mishra and Koehler’s “Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge” in practice. The site is an example of how technology can “build on existing knowledge and develop new epistemologies” (2006, p. 1029). In contrast to traditional, book-based learning, the website provides the potential to immerse a teacher and his/her students in local aboriginal heritage, via the one internet-based platform.

 

REFERENCES

 

Aboriginal Heritage Office: http://www.aboriginalheritage.org/

 

Mishra, P. & Koehler, M. J. (2006). Technological pedagogical content knowledge: A framework for teacher knowledge. Teachers College Record, 108 (6), 1017-1054. 

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Checklist - Natural or Built?

Activity 1 on this worksheet is a great scaffold to introduce Stage 1 HSIE students to the concepts of 'natural' and 'built.' 

Bec Isaacs's insight:

 

Scooped from a ‘Wolli Creek residents’ community website, this checklist is a great way to introduce Stage 1 HSIE students to the concepts of natural and built environments. It directly targets syllabus outcomes ENS1.5 and ENS1.6, and in particular the subject matter dot point: “Students will learn about natural, built and heritage features in the immediate environment and other areas.”

 

The worksheet’s definitions of ‘natural’ and ‘built’ are simple and concise –suitable for year 1 and 2 students of varying abilities.

 

I would provide this checklist to students as a guide for a ‘discovery walk’ around the school grounds, during which they would identify some natural and built features they could see.

 

The explicit goal of this exercise is to engage students in practical application of identifying natural from built. As per Hattie’s model of “visible learning,” the “mastery of the goal” must be explained to the children before setting out on the discovery walk (Hattie, 2008, as cited in Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p. 58). This entails a pre-walk discussion, whereby the teacher must ascertain what the children already know about the definitions of built and natural, clarify any confusion about what these terms mean, and clearly delineate that students must identify multiple natural and built features and fill out the Activity 1 table to bring back to the classroom.

 

Common to any Inquiry or Discover-based learning activity, the information that the children bring back to class only transforms from fact to understanding through reflection. In his “Theory of Inquiry,” John Dewey argues that students must reflect upon ideas to alter existing knowledge and in the process, discover new problems to question and explore (Dewey, 1939).

 

Using this model, a teacher would return to class with her students and reflect upon their findings. To address “the ways in which people interact” with natural and built features, and to encourage student thinking around “the relationship between environments and people” (as per the Stage 1 Environments outcomes), this would need to extend beyond an identification of the natural and built features children had found.

 

Some great discussion questions to encourage critical thinking may include:

Which were there first – the natural features or the built features?

Who constructed the built features?

Why did people construct the built features?

What happens to the natural environment when people build?

Do you think built features are a good thing?

What do you think might happen if people continued to build and build in the school grounds and in other natural environments?

 

REFERENCES

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Society and Environment. 5th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Dewey, J. (1939). Logic: The theory of inquiry. London: George Allen & Unwin. 

 

Wolli Creek Residents. (n.d.). Checklist – natural or built? Retrieved from http://www.wollicreek.org.au/tvt_schools/activity/TVT_Checklist_Natural_or_Built.pdf

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Build a City With Boxes on crayola.com

Build a City With Boxes on crayola.com | HSIE K-6, Stage 1: Natural-Built-Heritage | Scoop.it
Children know a lot about city planning because they're such good observers. Build on their planning and construction skills with this city made of boxes.
Bec Isaacs's insight:

Give children the tools to create their own sustainable city: what is the right mix of built and natural features?

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Amount of old ice in Arctic, 1987-2013 - YouTube

The winter ice pack in the Arctic was once dominated by multi-year*, thick ice. Today, very little old ice remains. This animation shows maps of sea ice age ...
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