HSIE Stage One Resources for SSS1.7 and SSS1.8
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Caring for Place - Caring for Country

Caring for Place - Caring for Country | HSIE Stage One Resources for SSS1.7 and SSS1.8 | Scoop.it
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This online resource booklet, Caring for Place – Caring for Country, provides a rich collection of valuable teaching resources and activities for teaching from an Aboriginal perspective. This teacher’s booklet is particularly for Stage One learners, and focuses on the relationship to land and place. Students are expected to have already been introduced to Aboriginal history and community in Early Stage One, and therefore this arrangement of resources is designed to follow on from previous Aboriginal studies. The booklet is collated under the partnership of the Aboriginal Education and Training Directorate and the NSW Department of Education and Training, thus focusing on issues relating to contemporary Aboriginal lifestyle, values, culture and relationship to land and place.

 

In particular, topic 8 explores the idea of ‘Respecting Place and Country’, and outlines a task that involves recognising roles and responsibilities of looking after the land and its people through the reading of Part 2 of Connie’s story. This section explores how Connie and her family care for their Wiradjuri country, and focuses on students’ responsibilities as members of a family, school and community. In addition, this can help students reflect on how they interact with others and care for others and for their land. Teachers should also emphasise the role of ‘Elders’, or older relatives in Indigenous culture, by introducing students to who they are and why they are highly respected and honoured. Ultimately, this task will raise awareness of the importance of each individual contributing to caring for the environment and caring for each other within the community. Teachers can form groups and use Worksheet 17. Students should be encouraged to discuss ways in which they can stay connected to their own places by looking after each other at home and at school, and then present these ideas to the whole class.

 

Teachers who are aiming to teach the syllabus outcome SSS1.8 and develop students’ awareness of roles and responsibilities through an Indigenous perspective can find quality tasks that link with other syllabus strands such as Cultures and Environments. Embedding contemporary Indigenous perspectives within the curriculum should be done holistically and in a culturally appropriate manner, as “non-Indigenous representations of Indigenous identities have frequently relied on stereotypes which have denied the diversity of Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islander people and the dynamic nature of Indigenous identities” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 393). Furthermore, Reynolds (2012) suggests that too often we "interpret Indigenous culture through our own cultural lens" (p.220). Teachers could therefore complement this shared reading of Connie’s story by inviting some Aboriginal community members to talk about their heritage and how they continue to respect their land and each other today.

 

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Board of Studies NSW. (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S. Retrieved 8 March, 2014, from http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B.. (2011). Teaching society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Reynolds, Ruth. (2012). Teaching history, geography and SOSE in the primary school. South Melbourne, Vic : Oxford University Press.

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What's My Job? - interactive webpage

What's My Job? - interactive webpage | HSIE Stage One Resources for SSS1.7 and SSS1.8 | Scoop.it
Emily Carruthers's insight:

As a teacher, it is important to plan an inquiry sequence and prepare different tasks to investigate a broader topic or outcome. Teachers can use this virtual resource to introduce children to the syllabus outcome SSS1.8. This website should not be used alone, but rather, in conjunction with other activities to investigate the ways in which students’ local communities are made up of people with different job roles and responsibilities. This site presents a statement in relation to a job that a person in their community might have, and then asks children to associate that role to a picture of a person. For example, one job role addressed is, “I help put out fires and save people. Click on my picture.” If the student gets the answer wrong, they have the opportunity to try again. Inquiry learning in HSIE can be broken into three broad categories: (1) establishing what we want to find out, (2) finding out, and (3) deciding what to do with what we’ve found (Gilbert, 2004, p. 29). Teachers should first introduce students to the aim and purpose of the investigation by explaining that different people have different jobs in their local community. In finding out what kind of jobs people have, this interactive site will raise students’ awareness of different jobs in their community. Students will develop a knowledge of the way humans interact as part of an interconnecting system within society, and investigate how communities are made up of individuals who work in different roles.

 

Utilising technology in the classroom by having students working on individual computers helps familiarise students at a stage one level with accessing new information through interactive methods, and allows them to control and direct their own learning. This is a short, simple activity, and should be combined with a project assessment task where particular job roles within the community are explored at greater depth. A project that would complement this interactive activity and help students apply this task to their own context could involve students designing a poster around an inquiry question: What job would you like to hold in your local community when you grow older? (i.e. be a politician, firefighter, police officers, librarian, or pilot etc.). The students should create a collage of images that represent the role they have chosen, and a brief description of why they have chosen that role. Students who are unsure of what they want to be when they are older could explore the job role of a family member. In addition, this topic can be extended to include an inter-school visit from the local firefighter or a police officer, where students can understand in more depth the importance of local communities having a range of people working together harmoniously in varying working roles. If the teacher would like to contrast these paid jobs with unpaid services within the local community, an inter-school visit from local volunteer associations such as the State Emergency Services can also help students gain a greater understanding of the difference between paid and unpaid roles and responsibilities.

 

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Board of Studies NSW. (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S. Retrieved 8 March, 2014, from http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/

 

Gilbert, Robert. (Ed.). (2004). Studying society and environment : a guide for teachers. Southbank, Vic. : Thomson Learning. 

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'A Day in the Life of Lucy' video clip

'A Day in the Life of Lucy' video clip | HSIE Stage One Resources for SSS1.7 and SSS1.8 | Scoop.it
Emily Carruthers's insight:

This video clip is a fantastic resource to use for Stage One students in HSIE. It can be used to teach outcome SSS1.8 – where students identify roles and responsibilities within families and the local community, and determine ways in which they should interact with each other. The clip, ‘A Day in the Life of Lucy’, is from the school resources section of World Vision Australia website, and introduces students to a young adopted girl named Lucy, who lives in rural Uganda. Lucy has many roles and responsibilities for her age. She helps her family by collecting water and firewood, cooking for her family and playing with her younger siblings. Lucy’s mother, Doreen, also has a role to support her family and earns money by selling bamboo in the markets.

 

This video allows children to outline different roles within the family through a global perspective, and students can learn that though some roles are paid, many responsibilities are unpaid. Teachers can use this resource to help students understand ways in which they should interact with each other. The video clip emphasises the importance of sharing and caring, and directs students to think about how everyone plays a part in assisting each other within the family unit. Teachers can design a suitable stage one reflective activity to complement this teaching resource. Some ideas can be found on the Global Education website. Teachers can help students create a Venn diagram to examine similarities and differences between the jobs that both Lucy and her mother did to help the family. Teachers can provide a reflective assessment task where students then examine roles and responsibilities in their own familial context, by drawing pictures of their family members and describing their roles and responsibilities.

 

This task aims to address a major aim of the study of HSIE, by relating global issues and a framework of ideas to everyday experiences. The student will be able to find similar connections between local and global contexts, as well as explore differences. Rob Gilbert explores how HSIE relates to students’ everyday lives by framing the area of learning under four categories. Teachers should ensure students in HSIE: (1) make sense of experiences through broader issues, ideas and experiences, (2) develop concepts, information and thinking processes through critical analysis, (3) evaluate and respond to experiences, and (4) express their own perspectives of the world and put these into action (Gilbert, 2004, pp. 5-6).

 

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Board of Studies NSW. (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S. Retrieved 8 March, 2014, from http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/

 

Gilbert, Robert. (Ed.). (2004). Studying society and environment : a guide for teachers. Southbank, Vic. : Thomson Learning. 

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Fun on the farm | Meat & Livestock Australia

Fun on the farm | Meat & Livestock Australia | HSIE Stage One Resources for SSS1.7 and SSS1.8 | Scoop.it
Emily Carruthers's insight:

This resource is a fun, virtual interactive game that is suitable for Stage One learners who are investigating syllabus outcomes SSS1.7 and SSS1.8. The resource is located in the Meat and Livestock Australia website. This resource can be used by teachers to explore the roles and responsibilities of different types of farmers in rural Australian communities. The website itself offers a wealth of background information for the teacher to understand in more depth the cattle, sheep and goat industries in Australia, as well as market information and livestock production. Teachers can then use the ‘Fun on the Farm’ virtual games to help students understand that farmers have different roles on the farm and different technologies in systems to produce goods for the Australian community. There are four games to choose from, all exploring different jobs that a farmer must perform to keep his farm running effectively and efficiently. For example, students can choose to fill the water tanks for the thirsty cows, weigh the cows, muster the cows to a new paddock, or fix the fences.

 

This interactive resource is not only a fun and engaging activity to incorporate into a broader investigation of the roles and responsibilities of farmers, but also develops an awareness of the variety of jobs that people can have within the broader Australian community. In addition, students will gain insight into where their food is sourced from and who works to produce the food that is placed on their table and in their lunchboxes on a daily basis. Teachers must be aware of the importance of synthesising content knowledge and pedagogical repertoire when planning lessons. Shulman’s ‘Pedagogical Content Knowledge’ approach helps teachers combine what to teach with how to teach. Teachers should be aware of the big picture by clearly outlining the outcomes to be taught and the specific subject matter that relates to their outcomes. Teachers can then use different resources such as this interactive webpage to vary how they teach the content knowledge. In completing this inquiry learning regarding the roles of farmers in the rural Australian community, an excursion could be planned to visit a farm so that students can engage what they have learned beyond the classroom and explore the subject matter in a real-life context.

 

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Board of Studies NSW. (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S. Retrieved 8 March, 2014, from http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/

 

Shulman, Lee S.. (1986). Those Who Understand: Knowledge Growth in Teaching, Educational Researcher, 15(2), 4-14.

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Pak Yono and growing rice in Indonesia

Emily Carruthers's insight:

This online book resource is terrific for teachers exploring outcomes SSS1.7 and SSS1.8 where students in stage one learn about how people and technologies in systems link to provide goods and services to satisfy needs and wants, and roles and responsibilities are given to different people within families, schools and local communities. This resource aims to introduce students to different systems across varying contexts. The book focuses on Pak Yono and his family and the roles they play in producing rice in Java, Indonesia. It explores the way in which rice is a system and demonstrates how goods and services satisfy the needs and wants of people in the local community. Students investigate different types of working conditions and identify a wide range of roles that play a part in the growing of rice in Indonesia. The jobs range from Pak Yono’s aunty threshing rice with her feet, to ducks playing an important role in eating snails and insects on the paddy fields to keep the crops healthy.

 

Students will come to the realisation that the products they buy in local supermarkets come from established systems both in the local and global community. Using this resource is a great way to introduce children to an unfamiliar global context using a familiar food source. Teachers can prepare an activity for students using rice paper and watercolour paint and brushes. Students can reflect on the ‘Rice Growing Cycle’ and pictures in the book and then choose a job within the cycle such as harvesting, threshing, or cooking. Students will paint a person working on one of these tasks in the rice growing process. The teacher can make this a more manageable activity by using watercolour pencils or markers, or even by spreading this task across more than one HSIE lesson.

 

Such an activity is important for students to explore a new area of inquiry. Students have pre-conceptions about how the world works, and teachers must be engaging them through different methods to help them appreciate new concepts. The National Research Council report on ‘How people learn’ suggests that students must (a) have factual knowledge, (b) understand knowledge in the context of a conceptual framework, and (c) organise knowledge (Bransford et. al, 2000, p. 16). This “metacognitive” approach helps students become active learners and engage with new information. Teachers should therefore not be afraid to explore the wealth of factual content in Pak Yono as students will engage in the resource in different ways and take control of their learning at different stages.

 

In addition, this activity helps teachers interrelate the Arts into literacy learning and shared reading. Arts processes “facilitate the selection, analysis, reflection and interpretation of information, at the same time enabling us to become more aware of our own social and cultural biases” (Ewing, 2010, p. 59). This activity offers a pathway for students to become more critical of their own experiences and pre-conceptions. Teachers can help students self-assess their learning by asking them to describe to the class which role they chose to paint as part of the rice growing process, and evaluate why they chose this role. Teachers can also encourage students to learn beyond the classroom by asking their parents if they can have rice for one of their evening meals during the week.

 

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Board of Studies NSW. (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S. Retrieved 8 March, 2014, from http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/

 

Bransford, John D., Brown, Ann L., Cocking, Rodney R..(Eds.). (2000). How people learn : brain, mind, experience, and school. National Research Council. Washington, D.C. : National Academy Press.

 

Ewing, R. (2010) Literacy and the arts in Christie, F. & Simpson, A. (Ed’s) Literacy and social responsibility: Multiple Perspectives. London: Equinox.

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