HSIE SSES1 Products students use and where they come from
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HSIE SSES1 Products students use and where they come from
Early Stage 1 Social Systems and Structures - 'needs versus wants' - trace the production chain for products students use
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Bush Tucker is Everywhere

Bush Tucker is Everywhere | HSIE SSES1 Products students use and where they come from | Scoop.it
As intended, this production both records Indigenous women gathering food for their families and teaches others the skills. (Video excerpt 2.59 minutesalso has educational notes.
Amy Fell's insight:

Content

'Bush tucker is everywhere' is part of a Television series Nganampa Anwernekenhe (1987-current), broadcast in various Aboriginal languages, and produced by the Central Australian Aboriginal Media Association (CAAMA). The clips are accompanied with curator notes and educator notes. These three downloadable videos feaure a group of women and children from Puyurra country in Yuendumu digging for bush potatoes and making bush flour, and Warlpiri man from Jessie Gap in Alice Springs finding wild figs, lemons and coconut. Although there are subtitles, it would be easy for teachers to read these aloud so students can follow what is happening.

 

Teaching idea

Open with a discussion about what bread students eat, and ask them if they’ve ever seen how bread is made. Watch the “where does bread come from?” resource from ABC Splash. Then watch the “making bush flour” video from Nganampa Anwernekenhe. Compare and discuss the differences in how bread can be made.

 

Assessment task idea

Students work in groups to role-play the process of bread-making. Provide them with a range of cooking tools such as a coolamon, a billy, a mixing bowl, a wooden spoon, a stoking stick etc… They can copy actions from the videos, such as making a fire or turning the oven on, mixing flour or kneading bush flour, pouring the mixture into a bowl or flattening it into a paddy. Assess students on their ability to do different cooking actions, select appropriate cooking tools, and sequence and differentiate the processes for making bread.

 

Literacy or numeracy strategy

Number the steps involved in making bread and use picture cards to sequence bread making processes. This begins their learning of ordinal numbering and sequencing.

 

Pedagogical research and ATSI selection criteria

The comparison between Indigenous and non-Indigenous cooking and food collection methods is indispensable to learning about cultural diversity. You can see how Aboriginal people locate bush food through place-placed learning (land links) and modelling the process of food gathering to the younger generation (deconstruct / reconstruct), as emphasised in the Eight Aboriginal Ways of Learning (Tyson, 2009).

 

This resource adheres to the Selection Criteria for the Evaluation of Aboriginal Studies and Torres Strait Islander Studies (2012). Though dated 1987, it is authentic, in most cases identifying the language and 'country' the people featured in the clip belong to. It acknowledges the longevity of traditional Indigenous cultures “since time immemorial” and the adaptability of Indigenous “living culture” in contemporary society. The clip depicts women as innovative, hard-working and knowledgeable, having an important role in gathering food, passing down knowledge and conserving the land. The presentation shows a balance of both men and women gathering food, whilst emphasising that some skills such as making bread are passed down through the women’s side. The language used in the educator notes is empowering, positive and does not stereotype. The notes stress the adaptability of combining both traditional and modern technology, such as digging out sand with a billycan and using rifles to hunt. The curator and educator notes are endorsed by The Learning Federation, and the films are produced by an Aboriginal-run film organisation based in the local region of filming, called the Central Australian Aboriginal Media Association (CAAMA). The clips are distributed online through Australian Film and Sound Archive, a partner of the Australian Government. The notes are written by Romaine Moreton, an Aboriginal woman from Dharug country, Western Sydney. The precise sites of filming are not able to be located, and the practices shown do not violate sacred protection rights. It is therefore acceptable in accuracy, support, participation and content is deemed available to the general public.

 

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LoraxClassroomGuide_WeAllNeedTrees.pdf

Amy Fell's insight:

Discover the Forest: We all need trees (The Lorax)

 

Content

A teachers guide to supplement the reading of ‘The Lorax’ by Dr Seuss. It includes a list of the surprising array of products made from trees. There are lesson plans and great classroom activities for K-2. There are further teaching resources, and a student page for extension material.

 

Teaching idea

Discuss products students think come from trees, then read Dr Seuss’ ‘The Lorax’. As an adaptation of the "tree-tective" game suggested in this resource, find and label some pictures of objects made from trees, such as table, carpet, cosmetics, wood and real objects where possible, such as soaps, fruit, paper. The list on this teaching guide resource will help. Hide the labels and tree-derived products around the classroom. Have students find them and place them on or under a big tree branch or fake Christmas tree.

Assessment task idea

To assess their understanding, extend the activity by hiding a mixture of products that do and do not come from trees, and ask students to identify which objects are from trees and which are from other raw materials like metals and plastics. This will assess student’s ability to classify and categorise information and realia.

Literacy or numeracy strategy

During the "tree-tective" game, encourage students to read the labels for the tree and non-tree derived products, such as “table”, “chair”, “box”, “paper” and “gum”.

Link to pedagogical research

The skill of classifying information, like tree versus non-tree derived products, is developed from Early Stage One and beyond. It is primarily a technical form of knowledge but is the foundation for in-depth knowledge and explorations such as environmental impact (Habermas, 1971 in Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011 p. 48).

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Teachers' Domain: Loop Scoops

Amy Fell's insight:

Loop Scoops (on Teachers Domain)

 

- Content:

A site about 'stuff' we use everyday, funded by the National Science Foundation, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Animation clips can be downloaded and shared, and are accompanied with background teacher information, quality lesson plans including inquiry questions and checking for understanding, classroom activities, assessment ideas and related subject areas. Clips are graded but can be accommodated to suit various age and ability levels.

 

Animation clips are focused around 'stuff' people want and use in everyday life. It helps trace production chains, furthers debate on ‘needs’ versus ‘wants’, and questions the sustainability and environmental impact of these products.

 

- Teaching idea:

A lesson idea focused on electronics might start with watching the clip ‘Electronic Gadgets’. Ask students what electronic gadgets they have in their homes. Explain that these gadgets have parts in them from all over the world. Trace the production chain by pinning pictures of components of gadgets onto a big map of the world.

 

- Assessment task idea and skills:

Assess student understanding by having students pick an electronic gadget and make a pictorial flow chart tracing the raw materials to the making of a whole gadget. Numeracy skills are embedded in these tasks as they learn how to sequence steps, count countries and look at the distance involved in global production of gadgets. Locating the origin of products on a world map develops student’s geospatial awareness and an idea of the distance traveled of some products (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 240).

 

Link to pedagogical knowledge:

Clips are incredibly interactive and engaging, encouraging students to examine their own 'stuff' in their everyday lives. The video extends student’s thinking beyond a technical knowledge of what products are made of and where they are made, to an emancipatory knowledge (Habermas, 1971, as cited in in Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 48). For example, the 'Electronic Gadgets' clip encouraging students to reflect on their needs and wants for the latest technology, with the main character deciding to keep playing his old gameboy so it doesn’t end up in landfill  Students reflect on their personal values based on a social awareness, (Adams, 1997, as cited in Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.120). 

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The Clothes Line | Oxfam Education

The Clothes Line | Oxfam Education | HSIE SSES1 Products students use and where they come from | Scoop.it
Teach about Fair Trade, the textiles industry and India with this series of lesson plans and photo story.
Amy Fell's insight:
Content

Produced by Great Britain’s Oxfam Education, The Clothes Line is a teaching sequence that traces the production chain for clothing from cotton farming in India to clothing shops in the UK. There are powerpoint image presentations, activities mapping countries where clothes are typically made, sequencing clothes production, etc. The project support tab breaks student tasks into learn, think and act, and there’s a teacher support tab for other resources, and for whole school fundraising and awareness raising about global production. 

 

Teaching idea

Discuss with students what clothes they wear and how they are made. Have them feel different textiles like wool, nylon and cotton. Explain that they feel different as they are made of different materials. Have a dress-ups box for students to wear different clothing materials, including multicultural clothing styles like sarees, ponchos, gumboots and flip-flops. Embed literacy skills in this activity by sticking labels to the items of clothing, to assist them in learning words like ‘hat’, ‘shoe’, ‘dress’, ‘sock’ and ‘cap’. Then view the picture slideshow from “the Clothes Line” to discuss how people all over the world make different clothes.

 

Assessment task idea

In groups, students find scrap materials and stick them onto a big picture of a person to show them wearing a type of clothing. Mark students on how well they match the material with the item of clothing, such as wool for a jumper or rubber for a swimming cap, and for their creative clothing ideas too!

 

Link to pedagogical research

Having students physically touching and wearing dress-up clothing is an effective use of kinaesthetic and tactile learning styles. Students develop skills of classification and differentiation of raw materials, and discuss similarities and differences of clothing made and worn in other countries. This resource is an excellent starting point for civic participation and community partnerships such as holding a school clothing drive for St. Vincent de Paul, and has potential for social justice actions such as anti-sweatshop campaigns (like No Sweat).

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search - splash.abc.net.au

search - splash.abc.net.au | HSIE SSES1 Products students use and where they come from | Scoop.it
Amy Fell's insight:

For the Juniors: Farm to Table, ABC Splash

Content

Filter the search on the left-hand-side to Early Stage 1 (Foundation). Videos will appear for where products come from, including honey, milk, apples, bread, rice and fish. Each video has supporting material including reflection questions and activities for before, during and after viewing material. There are also videos classified under Stage One for extension, showing the production of these materials, including “how do you make bread?” “how does rice get to the supermarket”, “from the dairy to the shop” and “picking and processing fresh apples”. In addition to linking to HSIE SSES1, they crossover with Science curriculum area ACSSU 002.

 

Teaching idea

Watch a range of clips from the “For the Juniors” site. In groups, students can talk about their experiences going grocery shopping, and cooking at home. Arrange an excursion to a local supermarket. Look at the range of products you can buy and show them the ‘Australian made’ logo. Show them the meat, eggs and dairy sections and discuss the different animals these products come from. Discuss which fruit and vegetables come from the ground, trees, shrubs etc…

 

Assessment task idea

Ask students to pick one food they saw in the supermarket and draw, write or talk about this food – were there different types of this food? What colour meant they were ripe? How big were they? How much? Where do you think it came from?

 

Literacy or numeracy strategy

Either on the supermarket excursion or using a selection of groceries brought into the classroom, have a treasure hunt where students have to find the ‘Australian made’ logo, something that costs a certain amount, something that comes in a pack of 3 or 6, etc… Using catalogues you’ve picked up from the supermarket excursion, ask students to cut out a range of pictures and stick them onto a big map of the supermarket (showing the dairy section, the fruit and vegetables section or the deli section).

 

Link to pedagogical research

Exploring the supermarket, being able to touch and see the range of products and see how they are classified, is a practical and active way of learning, linked to the community exploration idea explicated in Gilbert & Hoepper (2011), p. 153. Students see how their classroom learning is linked with the real world.

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