HSIE K-6 Social Systems and Structures
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HSIE K-6 Social Systems and Structures
SSS1.8 Identifies roles and responsibilities within families, schools and the local community, ad determines ways in which they should interact with others. (roles and responsibilities of people who work in services in the community, both paid and unpaid)
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Behind the News - 10/05/2011: Volunteer Week

Behind the News - 10/05/2011: Volunteer Week | HSIE K-6 Social Systems and Structures | Scoop.it
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This is a video from Behind the news, an ABC programme which was broadcast on the 10th of May, 2011 about students volunteering to help elderly people at their homes or at aged care facilities. It describes what kinds of volunteering jobs they do and what they think about volunteering. This is a fantastic resource to use when teaching about roles and responsibilities of volunteer workers in the community. Teachers could play the video as stimulus for a discussion. Students can be put into groups to discuss what they can do to help old people if they had the opportunity to visit homes of elderly people or aged care facilities. Teachers can provide a big piece of paper (A3 size) to the students so that they can make a list of things that they can do and share their ideas with the whole class. Teachers can assess their learning through informal observations about their participation and engagement with the task and also through the list they have created. When showing the video to the students, teacher should stop after the reporter says “Here's a number for you 713 million!” and discuss the number ‘million’. Students can also learn place values. Using the internet resources like this is effective in keeping students engaged throughout the activity. According to Schellens and Valcke (2005), using the internet resources and allowing extra information available through online helps students to stay on task. Furthermore, teachers can provide meaningful learning experiences by using technologies such as digital video, when they apply both Pedagogical Content Knowledge (knowledge about how students learn and effective teaching and knowledge of standard technologies such as the Internet and digital videos etc.)and Technological Content Knowledge (how technology may be used to provide new ways of teaching content) to their teaching (Agyei & Keengwe, 2012).

 

 

References:

Agyei, D. & Keengwe, J. (2012). Using technology pedagogical content knowledge development to enhance learning outcomes. Education and Information Technologies. doi: 10.1007/s10639-012-9204-1.

 

Schellens, T. & Valcke, M. (2005). Collaborative learning in asynchronous discussion groups: what about the impact on cognitive processing? Computers in Human Behaviour, 21, pp. 957-975.

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working-with-aboriginal-communities.pdf

Miyu Beaumont's insight:

This is a document developed by Board of Studies NSW, in consultation with communities, Aboriginal Education Workers, consultants and teachers, in order to support teachers in their implementation of the Aboriginal perspectives in their teaching. The main focus of this document is to provide appropriate instructions and knowledge to work with Aboriginal communities effectively. It provides information that is practical and useful when contacting and consulting Aboriginal communities. For example, where to contact, how to prepare students, any sensitive issues to consider etc. Inviting members of an Aboriginal community to come and talk to students about their experiences and communities e.g. kinship provides a fantastic opportunity for students to learn the topic from Aboriginal perspectives. Students can learn the roles of responsibilities of Aboriginal people in their community effectively in an engaging way. It also allows students to see the Aboriginal contemporary cultures and societies. Teachers should provide students enough time to reflect on their experiences. Teachers can provide a sheet of paper for students to write what they have learnt and express their experiences through drawing. It is important that teachers are prepared to “help children by providing them with appropriate models of text-types” (Winch, 2010, p449). Therefore, before students start writing their own reflection, teachers should spend time talking about any writing structures and give examples of how to write their reflections so that students are provided with good models of writing. Teachers can assess their learning through their engagement and participation and they can also collect students' reflections. When teachers are able to work collaboratively with Aboriginal people so that Aboriginal perspectives and voices are respected, they can form a supportive and welcoming environment for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students in the classroom. According to Department of Education and Training (2003), “strong, positive and supportive learning environment produce improved student outcomes” as it increases students' engagement (p7).

 

References:

 

Department of Education and Training. (2003). Quality teaching in NSW pubic schools. Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate, Sydney, NSW.

 

Winch, G. (2006). Literacy: reading, writing and children’s literature. South Melbourne, Oxford University Press.

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Build A Box City | Make A Box Town | Kids’ Craft

Build A Box City | Make A Box Town | Kids’ Craft | HSIE K-6 Social Systems and Structures | Scoop.it
Miyu Beaumont's insight:

This website provides instructions on how to build a city using boxes. Students can design and build their own community after they have learnt about roles and responsibilities of the people in their community. Students can decide what kinds of facilities, buildings and people they would like to have in their community while discussing about roles and responsibilities of each of them. This activity can be integrated with other KLAs as well e.g. maths and Creative Arts. For example, boxes can be used to teach students about areas, volumes and measurements e.g. length and distance. Furthermore, teachers can also integrate this activity with Creative Arts when students are making buildings, houses etc. for their community. Integrating HSIE with other KLAs is very effective in increasing the amount of time that could be spend on teaching it because subjects like HISE and Creative Arts “have all seen reductions in the time allocated to them as a result of the demands of high stakes testing” such as NAPLAN (Polesel, Dulfer and Turnbull, 2012, p11). Incorporating Creative Arts activities will also promote many positive learning outcomes for students such as enhanced social interaction and behaviour, improved self-confidence, motivation, self-directed learning and self-esteem (Gibson & Ewing, 2011, p1). Teachers can assess students' learning through informal observation throughout the lesson. They can also take a photo of the city the students have built and collect the written descriptions of facilities, buildings and roles and responsibilities of the people who live there.

 

References:

Gibson, R & Ewing, R (2011). Transforming the curriculum through the arts. Melbourne: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Polesel, J., Dulfer, N., & Turnbull, M. (2012). The Experience of Education: The impacts of high stakes testing on school students and their families. Literature Review. Whitlam Institute within the University of Western Sydney.

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World Vision Australia

World Vision Australia | HSIE K-6 Social Systems and Structures | Scoop.it
Miyu Beaumont's insight:

A Day in the Life of Lucy film clip

This is a film clip produced by World Vision Australia about a girl Lucy who lives in rural Uganda where there are limited resources available, with her adopted mother and 9 brothers and sisters. The film shows a typical day of Lucy, helping her family and describes roles and responsibilities of everyone in her family.This video is a great resource when teaching roles and responsibilities in a family and also in a community. Through this video, students are able to see the topic from a global perspective and find any similarities and differences between Australian community and the community of rural Uganda. Although this video is mostly about the roles and responsibilities in a family, teachers can extend it to a community level by discussing the job that Lucy's mum does (collecting bamboos to sell), and asking who provides water and food in our community and in Lucy's family. In groups or in pairs, students can compare the two countries and create a table with similarities and differences that they found. Another activity that the students can do is to describe their typical day and discuss how their needs are met e.g. who provides food/water, any people who work in their community e.g. bus drivers, canteen workers etc. Teachers can assess their learning through their engagement and participation and through the tables that they have created. Before playing the film, teachers should make sure that students know the necessary vocabularies in order to complete the task and to understand the video. Teachers could also revisit any new words that they learnt after the activity. Allowing students to work within a group/with a pair allows more discussion which leads to 'higher knowledge construction' (Schellens and Valcke, 2005, p973).

 

References:

Schellens, T. & Valcke, M. (2005). Collaborative learning in asynchronous discussion groups: what about the impact on cognitive processing? Computers in Human Behaviour, 21, pp. 957-975.

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Sesame Street: People in Your Neighborhood

Miyu Beaumont's insight:

The song “People in your neighbourhood” created by sesame street describes the people e.g doctors and grocers who work in the community. There are other versions of this song which sing about other people who work in the community e.g. librarian, teachers, plumbers etc. and they are easily accessible through the YouTube website. This is a great resource to use when teaching about roles and responsibilities of the people in the community because students will love singing it. Furthermore, when students have access to quality music experience, they can achieve better educational outcomes and show better social skills (Gibson & Ewing, 2011, p1). Teachers can play the song as an introduction to the topic 'people in the community' to engage students and also to give some ideas of what people do in our community. This can initiate a discussion of other people in the community and their roles and responsibilities. Students can then be put into pairsand pick one job that they would like to know more about. They can do some research using information books (factual texts) etc. and make their own lyrics that fit into the song “People in your neighbourhood”. Students can share their songs with the rest of the class. Teachers can record a video of the students' performance to keep an evidence of their learning. Teachers introduce different types of information books which suit the students' ability level. Teachers need to make sure that students have done literacy lessons on factual texts (e.g. what languages features are present and how they work) in order for them to read effectively because many students try to read factual texts in the same way they read fiction (Winch, 2010, p118).

 

References:

Gibson, R & Ewing, R (2011). Transforming the curriculum through the arts. Melbourne: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Winch, G. (2006). Literacy: reading, writing and children’s literature. South Melbourne, Oxford University Press.

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