Migration - HSIE resources for Stage 3
100 views | +0 today
Follow
Migration - HSIE resources for Stage 3
Outcome: CUS3.3 CUS3.4

Cultural influences and other factors affecting identity.
Curated by Rhianna John
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rhianna John
Scoop.it!

Objects Through Time | Australia's migration history timeline | NSW Migration Heritage Centre

Objects Through Time | Australia's migration history timeline | NSW Migration Heritage Centre | Migration - HSIE resources for Stage 3 | Scoop.it
Rhianna John's insight:

 

The NSW Migration Heritage Centre is a virtual museum that promotes intercultural awareness and understanding of Identity. This site will be great for teachers as it "promotes interest, prevents boredom and encourages students to commit themselves to historical learning" (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.201).

 

The vast history of migration within NSW from 1978 to the present is displayed through personal recounts, photographs, maps and significant cultural artifacts. The website provides valuable resources such as teacher notes, class activates and fact sheets that can be downloaded and adapted in teaching Stage 3 the history of migration and its influence on Australian Identity. The website also provides links to heritage sites important to New South Wales’s history of migration and settlement. This may be very useful when incorporating 'Placed-based Learning' into a unit of work.

 

I found the online exhibition, ‘Objects Through Time’ extremely informative and engaging. I can really see myself using the content effectively with students within my own classroom. A historical overview of people, technology and their ideas are conveyed through a vast collection of significant objects from many different cultural groups. These groups include; Aboriginal people who discovered Australia, the Macassan and European explorers, sailors and navigators who mapped the country and the waves of 19th and 20th century migrants who helped build it. As the collection spans 60,000 years, teachers may ask students to find and report on an object which relates to a particular theme, era or cultural background.

 

These fascinating objects will enhance student learning as they actively explore, discuss and identify links between world events and the arrival of migrant groups as having a profound influence on Australia’s rich and diverse identity.

 

An exciting, authentic assessment task for students to actively engage with their own identity and personal story through 'objects', could consist of putting together a “What’s Your Story?” suitcase or box. Students can include, personal family photos and treasured items relating to their interests, beliefs, gender or cultural heritage. The items would be brought to school and shared among peers within a lesson. Students would present formally to the class their chosen 'story' objects, where they come from, why they are valuable and how each object has influenced or reflects their own identity. Students can engage with each other's objects, ask questions and begin to see connections with what things are similar and different. Using all the inquired knowledge of each object, the class could begin to collabrate together to work out the 'bigger story' of where each object fit on a historical timeline. 

 

In this assessment process, a global perspective and a community of inquiry is implemented as students collect, question and analyse cultural objects that represent a broader 'global' picture of cultural influence unifying Australian identity. It will also allow students to understand more about their peers, appreciate the diversity within their classroom and be supported in their self-esteem.

 

Gilbert, R & Hopper, B. (2011). Teaching Society & Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengae Learning Australia.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rhianna John
Scoop.it!

Making multicultural Australia | Teacher and student resources on multiculturalism, cultural diversity and tolerance

Making multicultural Australia | Teacher and student resources on multiculturalism, cultural diversity and tolerance | Migration - HSIE resources for Stage 3 | Scoop.it
Assisting young people, parents, teachers and community explore Australia's cultural diversity. Teaching resources on multiculturalism and strategies to promote cultural diversity and tolerance.
Rhianna John's insight:

'Making Multicultural Australia' is extremely beneficial for teachers, providing support through a variety of lesson ideas, activities and useful resources on multicultural education, diversity and tolerance. This website will assist teachers to promote tolerance of difference within their classroom, and could also be used with Stage 3 students to enhance their knowledge on immigrant groups, Aboriginal groups, religious groups and others affecting Australian identity. 

 

Of course, assessing student’s prior knowledge on what the terms, 'Identity', 'belonging', 'migration' and 'diversity' means to them on an individual basis, is extremely important. An opening activity within a lesson can involve a brainstorm or a mind map task where students are asked to write, draw, or use assemble pictures to illustrate their answers to;

 

My identity is....

I love Australia’s diversity because….

I feel like I belong when….

 

The accumulated variety of answers will promote further discussion about the diverse nature of Australian Identity and can be formulated into a visual class poster within the classroom. Student therefore will have the opportunity to develop and add on new thoughts or ideas as well as ‘change their minds’ as they "engage with new information and different perspectives” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2001, p. 102) within a broader unit of study.

 

Another lesson plan to develop critical literacy skills could include an interactive activity using information gathered from this website and from http://www.racismnoway.com.au/. For example, a 'Mix & Match' task where students match first-hand stories, case studies, or current news articles to a number of corresponding titles such as; 'refugee', 'ethnic', 'migrant' 'asylum-seeker', or other important key words such as 'discrimination', 'racism’, ‘prejudice' & 'stereotype'. This type of activity will assist students to develop a sophisticated vocabulary essential for the learning and understanding of multiculturalism.

 

Gilbert, R & Hopper, B. (2011). Teaching Society & Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne:Oxford University

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rhianna John
Scoop.it!

Australian of the Year Awards

Australian of the Year Awards | Migration - HSIE resources for Stage 3 | Scoop.it
Rhianna John's insight:

 It is important that students in Stage 3 understand the influence many significant Australians of all ages and from all walks of life have on shaping our culture and national Identity. Many students may only be aware of typical, stereotypes of sporting heroes or pop culture icons. The 'Australian of the Year' website is a great resource for teachers to use in their classroom, in order to introduce students to a number of possibly, unfamiliar Australian individuals of diverse backgrounds, whose great achievements we should appreciate and acknowledge. Stage 3 students should be able to easily navigate their way through this site with assistence from the teacher.

 

A teaching idea for a lesson could involve students brainstorming and creating a class list of many significant Australians they admire or view as a role model. In formulating the list, students would be introduced to the concept of the ‘Australian of the Year Award’, it’s history and what it represents. Students would be asked to locate, and research an individual on the website's honor roll who have Aboriginal or multicultural heritage. These individuals may include, Laurie Baymarrangga an indigenous community leader or Akram Azini, the 2013 'Young Australian of the Year' recipient, who moved to Australia from Afghanistan at the age of 11 and now mentors young Indigenous people and primary students in a small farming community in WA.

 

Students can engage with their personal stories and prepare oral presentations conveying the reasons for their national recognition, and their contribution towards shaping Australia’s values and Identity. Students could also devise a personal 'Thank You' letter or prepare questions to ask these individuals, if they ever had the chance to meet them. 

 

The main purpose of this site is to allow Students the opportunity to form new opinions, debate and reflect on what it means to be 'Australian' in a broader sense that does not focus on stereotypes. Students can also identify attributes that make for a positive role model and contributor within our society. They should also consider the implications of not acknowledging important people and their contributions to society (as seen in the past, in relation to Indigienous culture) and reflect on the negative dishamony of our nations identity which may result from this.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rhianna John
Scoop.it!

Immigration Australia - a special report (Hackham East Primary School)

Students investigate the plight of refugees from a range of perspectives and express their views and opinions about current immigration and refugee issues in...
Rhianna John's insight:

Immigration, and refugee issues have become a hot topic of debate and discussion in Australia. Therefore, it is important that Stage 3 children are aware of the the reasons for their prominence in current news and politics. This video would be great to use with Stage 3 students as a form of visual and audio engagement and to mediate their entry into a wider cultural/global discussion or debate.

 

What I find most appealing about this resource is that it was created from the perspective of primary aged students, who have taken an active and informed interest on current issues affecting Australia’s identity. The students share their personal views and opinions in a relatable and thought provoking way, while also raise some important questions for consideration and further investigation.

 

Understanding the vast reasons why people continue to migrate to Australia and learning to appreciate the hardships and struggles many face to arrive here, is essential. This report will assist teachers to promote tolerance and sensitivity of difference within their classrooms, and to acknowledge the benefits of living in a democratic society that offers a safe place for all diverse cultures, beliefs and traditions to live together in harmony.

 

After watching this video, to stimulate critical thinking, students can inverstigate, or be assigned 'roles' to practice historical debate (guided by the teacher) on the questions put forward to the viewer, including: 

 

1. Is Australia really doing enough to help the millions of refugees around the world looking for a safe place to live?

2. Can we afford to offer more people a place to call home, or are we doing enough?

 

Students can also research the United Nations website http://www.un.org/en/globalissues/refugees/  and report on the purpose of the UN and their involvement in current global refugee issues,  

 

(Here is another very beneficial video on the same topic-worth a look).

http://splash.abc.net.au/media/-/m/29475/refugee-kids-adjusting-to-a-new-culture?source=upper-primary-history 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rhianna John
Scoop.it!

efood2_Chapter6.pdf

Rhianna John's insight:

'Advance Australia Fare' is a chapter from the book, titled ‘e- Food and Technology’, by Leanne Compton and Carol Warren. The book is used primarily by students in secondary school, however I feel it could also be beneficial for teachers and students in upper (Stage 3) primary.

This chapter in particular, has a great global perspective as it outlines the influence and impact many cultural groups, who migrated to Australia, have had on shaping our contemporary Itentity tthough our love of food.

 

Australia has embraced many new foods, tastes and products as a result of Globalization and this is very evident on the shelves of our supermarkets and shops. What I find very appealing about this resource is its clear acknowledgement of native bush foods, discovered by the Aboriginals, as the traditional Australian cuisine. These native foods, inlcuding fruits, berries, game meat and seafood continue to be embraced and found on restaurant menus around Australia.

 

There are some great discussion starters, questions and brainstorming ideas within this resource, which could easily be adopted into a variety of HSIE lessons for Stage 3. I was intrigued by page 28, which features an article on the Chinese Market Gardens, situated in Le Perouse, a suburb in south-eastern Sydney. These market gardens are listed on the State Heritage Register as they played a huge role in supplying the food needs to NSW and reveal many stories of cultural diversity and identity within Australia. Students could investigate and examine the history of the Chinese Garden Markets, what is grown there, its connection to European settlers and migration and its special significance on Chinese communities today. Through school excursion, Students could visit the site, and  possibly interview significant people, such as Gordan Ha's family who have been involved with the garden markets for over 40 years.

 

Another simple class activity can consist of a 'find some who has eaten....' task. This would allow students to collect information on various cultural foods within Australia. Graphs and tables, involving numeracy strategies could be formulated with the collected data. Students could also trace the history of their favorite cuisine online and research its introduction into Australia.

 

To embed an Indigenous/ Torres Strait perspective into a lesson, teachers could hire (for 3 weeks) a ‘Bush Tucker Box’ from the Australian Museum http://australianmuseum.net.au/Museum-in-a-Box-Aboriginal-Food-Technology and design a number of activities and interactive tasks, such as classification flow charts to examine the ways Indigenous people have utalised bush food and continue to process and use the native resources in innovative ways today. Embedding a local place-based appraoch to learning about Aboriginal people and land is essential.

 

more...
No comment yet.