HSIE - Original Stories
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HSIE - Original Stories
original stories of other students, their families, their community and other communities
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Family Tree Kids! - Making History Fun

Family Tree Kids! - Making History Fun | HSIE - Original Stories | Scoop.it
Annette English's insight:

History couldn't get much more exciting than a scavenger hunt! This child minded family history website will excite students to investigate their families as they are positioned as a 'family detective'. One of the many activities it suggests is a scavenger hunt of Grandma's attic. This could easily be extended to a weekend assignment of hunting for family artefacts and stories from any older member of a students family. As the class explores this family tree site they will be exposed to many new terms (artefact, ancestors, citizenship, etc.) and be clued in to many things to look out for and ask when searching for interesting family stories. Students can print and take with them lists of key items to look for on a hunt or what to pack to make sure they are prepared for all the answers. 
The site also provides a worksheet that the teacher could modify for stage one where students can record any traditions they discover on their hunt. The worksheet asks for the origins of the traditions, the people involved and how it is carried out. Along with activities used with the Historic House Trust archive pictures (Scooped below!) these investigations will get students talking to each other about stories of their own families. 
The hands on approach will help develop important HSIE skills of locating information and using a variety of sources such as archives and people (BOS, 2006). 
When students come back together in the classroom they could use their collective investigations to timeline any common events or stories they uncovered.

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Historic Houses Trust - Full Record

Historic Houses Trust - Full Record | HSIE - Original Stories | Scoop.it
The Historic Houses Trust is a leader in the conservation and management of historic places in Australia. As well as opening our museums to the public, we produce exhibitions, events, publications and education programs.
Annette English's insight:

Historic Houses Trust have a huge collection of archived photos that help students to understand a different time. I would use a picture like this as a stimulus for students to talk about their own families and what their life was like growing up. 
As a class students could look at this photo, without prior knowledge of NSW in the 1900s, and they could see that the father in this family wears a suit, the children all dress very similarly and conservatively, they have a family dog and they live in a small and isolated house. Students will be able to recognise that this family has its own story and there are particular things that they would have valued (such as their dog) and certain ways that they lived their life. 
From here the class could all bring in photos that depict their whole family. As a pair activity students could look at their own and their partners photo and identify key features as the class did to this photo. Prompting questions could include 'what in the photo is different or special to their family?', 'who is in the photo?' and 'where was the photo taken?'. This activity, as part of an active and experiential learning lesson, will help students 'reflect on self in the world' (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p145). Students could then be asked to annotate their own picture with stories or facts of their own childhood. Sharing these reflections is an easy way to expose students to stories of other students families and as a base for further comparison to the stories of families from the past and from other communities. 

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Dust Echoes

Annette English's insight:

This site has a great range of Dreamtime stories that have been brought to life by animation. The videos are great to watch but there are many other resources to be found - study guides, glossaries and importantly, explanations of original meaning and origin. 
The detail of each story's origin is excellent; it explains which people the story comes from, where in Australia it comes from and in what language it was originally told. 
The particular story that I viewed and enjoyed was Brogola. This is a story of a boy searching for the spirit of his ancestors. The story begins to explore the use of animals in Aboriginal story telling. 
While students will enjoy these vivid animations it is important that they recognise that they originate from the Northern Territory and recognise that 'while cultures and traditions across the country have much in common there are distinct regional differences' (Aboriginal Studies Press, 2010, p39). If teachers are using this resource in Sydney it would be great as an introduction to Dreamtime, a significant type of original stories in Australia, but could be made more relevant to the school's community by continuing the students exposure to these stories by inviting an local elder to the school. Using the knowledge from the video, students could ask the elder about animals and spirits used in Dreamtime stories and, more importantly, ask to hear a Dreamtime story that is significant to the people of their area. 
Its fantastic to see that this resource has been developed with the assistance of Aboriginal consultants, with the idea of sharing their stories with others. Tom Lewis, one of the Indigenous consultants explains 'we are telling our stories to you in a way you can understand, to help you see, hear and know.'  

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Canterbury’s People | NSW Migration Heritage Centre

Canterbury’s People | NSW Migration Heritage Centre | HSIE - Original Stories | Scoop.it
Annette English's insight:

Canterbury City Council has produced a resource that shares with everyone the stories of 20 local community members. These rich and detailed experiences start from all different places around the world - country New South Wales, Greece, Korea, Lebanon, Italy and many more - and share the commonality of finishing in the diverse city of Canterbury. Although text heavy, this resource is fantastic for informing teachers of the real experiences and stories of authentic members of the community. A teacher could easily take key points and small anecdotes from some of these stories and work with students to develop simple profiles of people in their community. Discussion of their different stories will shed light on different cultures, different experiences of migration and various traditions that are alive in Australia today. These discussion will aid the development of tolerant and respectful attitudes to others. 
The Melbourne Declaration of Educational Goals for Young Children (2008) recognises the need for schools to 'nurture the appreciation of and respect for social, cultural and religious diversity and a sense of global citizenship'. Globalisation is a huge concept for stage one students, but starting close to home in their own community will help them to see the strong links that Australia has with other countries all over the world.  

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A Convict Story - Journeys

A Convict Story - Journeys | HSIE - Original Stories | Scoop.it
Annette English's insight:

The original story of migration to Australia! A stage one class can explore this site together to discover facts about the reasons for coming to Australia, the journey of the convicts and life in Australia. 
The site offers a video showing the journey from England to Australia, giving details and dates along the way that the teacher can explain to the class. As an extension of hearing the convicts' story and understanding their journey, there are activities where students can map their own families journey to Australia. This would be best done as a class on an IWB as the program is not outrageously child user friendly. This is a great way to start the discussion on the great range of people that have come to Australia and the stories they have brought from their communities to ours. 
As the class explore the site they will also find activities based around the Gordon Syron painting 'Invasion- An Aboriginal Perspective' which will help them understand the First Fleet story from all angles.  

Within the facts offered on the site is the figure that '1 in 10 Australians have a convict ancestor'. Students could be asked to investigate with their parents and return to the class with a yes or no answer to having a convict ancestor. This would then become a great KLA link as the class could use the data they collect in numeracy lessons to formulate their own class' statistics. 

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