Different ways of communicating - A stage 1 primary resource
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Technology and Education as Communication

The Norwegian Centre for ICT in Education (www.iktsenteret.no), The purpose of the Norwegian Centre for ICT in Education is to contribute to the realization ...
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It is no secret that the prevalence of ICT has increased in schools and has become an intrinsic part of teaching in most developed nations. Not only does technology give teachers the opportunity to diversify their pedagogical practices, it also enables teachers and schools to share, collect and communicate information regarding education (Adams, 2011).

 

The above video, although it is about Norway, urges schools to use ICT to to it's full advantage in order to engage students and improve educational outcomes for them. Despite the origin of the video, it is relevant in any classroom where ICT is present, but not fully utilised.

 

While it might seem that this video is more relevant to teachers than students, it can be used to promote the idea to students that education (in tandem with technology) is a form of communication that can have widespread benefit.

For stage 1 students, this may be a little hard to grasp, but with appropriate scaffolding, the idea of education as communication can grow. This can be achieved by starting such things as a classroom blog page, which can be shared and commented on by other students in the class and school. Students can reflect on experiences at such things as school excursions, fetes and camps as well as educational workshops.

Posts that are published can be reviewed by other members of the class and commented on.

 

While this kind of free-sharing information is only on a local scale, it begins to show students how easily information and thus, education can be communicated between people without ever being in the same room. If possible, sister schools can begin to collaborate with each other, and this can really show students the possibilities available when using ICT in education.

 

The subject matter related to C.U.S1.4 (DET, 2013) is all about different ways of communicating, and in light of this, utilisation of technology allows students to interact in ways that are relevant to their life and times (Adams, 2011).

 

Adams, P. (2011). ICT and Pedagogy: Opportunities Missed? Journal of Education. 39(1), p.21-33.

 

Department of Education and Training. (2013). HSIE K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies, NSW.

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Religion as Communication

Religion as Communication | Different ways of communicating - A stage 1 primary resource | Scoop.it
Interfaith Explorers programme is designed to give teachers everything they need to plan a half-term programme of learning, ideally for use during their pupils’ final term of primary school.
Michael Nemeth's insight:

Part of the C.U.S1.4 (DET, 2013) outcome in the NSW HSIE Syllabus is describing religious practices of students' families and communities. When looking at religion it can be interesting to draw on how this portal is used to communicate various ideas about society and values.

 

This resource offers a range of information and activities in order to promote interfaith understanding and tolerance in primary aged students. Using this as a springboard for a lesson on religion can help students to see religion as a way in which people have communicated and how it continues to be used this way in modern-day society. While this resource has been designed primarily as part of inter-faith week. Content can be extrapolated upon to form a series of lessons.

 

As a basic activity, students can be asked first and foremost to identify religions that may be a part of their family and/or community. It is likely that many classrooms will have a range of present religions which will serve to enhance this activity by showing students just how diverse a classroom can be. A table can be used to be identify religions that are practiced within the classroom, and this can even be expanded upon by taking a survey of other classrooms or even the school.

 

Using activities based on those outlined in this resource, students can move from identifying defining factors of certain religions (e.g. texts, events, ceremonies, practices) and learning ABOUT religion itself to seeing it as a way in which moral values and ideas have been passed down throughout generations (Barnes, 2011). Students can be asked to construct ideas on how they think religion plays a part in communicating moral values between generations.

 

Obviously all of the aforementioned material will not be able to be covered in one lesson so this is more designed as a unit of work that promotes tolerance and understanding amongst students as well as enhancing their knowledge of religious practices and how these invariably affect their lives.

 

It should be noted that this resource is aimed primarily at the equivalent of Stage 3, however there is no reason why the content cannot be altered to introduce these concepts to an earlier stage.

 

Barnes, P. (2011). What has Morality to do with Religious Education? Journal of Beliefs and Values, 32(2), p.131-141.

 

Department of Education and Training. (2013). HSIE K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies, NSW.

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Wadeye Song Database

Wadeye Song Database | Different ways of communicating - A stage 1 primary resource | Scoop.it
Michael Nemeth's insight:

This resource contains information on the 'Wadeye' area of the Northern Territory (also known as Port Keats) including songs and songsets, events, languages and places pertinent to particular area of indigenous culture. When looking at C.U.S1.4 (Describes cultural, linguistic and religious practices of their family, their community and other communities) (DET, 2013) this resource can be used to paint a picture of the diversity of language as a means of communication amongst a small part of Australian indigenous culture. In relation to the subject matter 'different ways of communicating' it can additionally iterate to students the idea of traditional dance and song as a means of communicating between smaller parts of Aboriginal communities.

 

For Stage 1, there are a multitude of activities that can be derived from such a resource. For instance, in consultation with a local elder or indigenous person, some of these songs can be learned and recreated by the class. Additionally, work can be undertaken by students to find more indigenous languages in other parts of Australia. This can be aided by using a traditional map of Australia that shows the complexity of Aboriginal borders. The purpose here is to outline to students how rich the linguistic culture is and how it affects communication between indigenous people.

 

When using this resource, it can also be tied in with information and performance of traditional indigenous dance (obviously in consultation with indigenous members of the community), particularly D.A.S1.7 'Performs simple dance sequences incorporating basic movement skills or patterns' (DET, 2013). Linking in with the dance strand will help to reiterate to students that there are different ways that communities communicate and that it can be through dance, song, language and various other means.

 

 

Department of Education and Training (2013). HSIE K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies, NSW.

 

Department of Education and Training (2013. PDHPE K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies, NSW.

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Communication Technology

Learning about the history of technology can help children see how inventions and technology progress. Have you ever taught your child about how people use t...
Michael Nemeth's insight:

In age of where technology influences almost everything that we do (as both adults and children) it is important for students to learn how these technologies have progressed, and thus affected parts of their lives, most notably, communication (Adams, 2011).

 

This short video (despite it's questionable production value) paints a very brief picture of how technology has developed over the years, from snail mail to computers and email. As a teacher, this can be used as a template for an activity where students can timeline certain technological achievements and explore how these have enhanced communication over the years.

 

As students are now growing up in an era of smartphones and computers, where communication is instantaneous, it may be difficult for them to comprehend a world without this communicative prowess. While it would be foolish to dwell on the past, it helps students to have some perspective as to how technology has shaped communication in the modern world.

 

When looking at outcome C.U.S1.4 (DET, 2013), students can identify ways in which their family communicate with one another. It is likely that most families will have access to smartphones and computers. In light of this, students will come to realise that technology has become an absolutely intrinsic part of their society and one that is often taken for granted (Adams, 2011).

 

Whilst stage 1 students may not have continuous access to such technologies, they can identify how these are used in their families lives.

 

Adams, P. (2011). ICT and Pedagogy: Opportunities Missed? Journal of Education. 39(1), p.21-33.

 

Department of Education and Training. (2013). HSIE K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies, NSW.

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World Languages

World Languages | Different ways of communicating - A stage 1 primary resource | Scoop.it
Navigation map and statistical summary for the language situation in the world
Michael Nemeth's insight:

This resource (in similarity with the Wadeye website) strives to illustrate how language is spread throughout the world. The map on this website is a perfect tool for showing primary students that language has a wide and eclectic reach, sometimes defying borders and oceans (Richardson, 2012).

Using this resource, student's can mouse-over certain areas of the world and hone in what language(s) are most predominant in their chosen area. As well as getting this information, students will also be privy to information such as what languages are also common through immigration (information which can be used to explore other subject matter at a later date). When teaching a lesson like this, it is important to educate students on the difference between language and dialect, particularly in the case of Chinese which has a multitude of variations. Despite this distinction, students can still see how diverse language in our world is.

 

In addition to learning about languages of the world, students can undertake more in-depth tasks such as - identifying the 'most spoken' languages, identifying which languages are spread most throughout the world and so on. Students findings can be compared and collaborated in the class in the form of a poster that contains their findings.

 

This resource and subsequent learning activities align perfectly with C.U.S1.4 (DET, 2013) as it allows students to observe languages in other areas of the world and then hone in on their own communities and families where they can identify languages that are used in their own experience.

 

As a resource with a global perspective, learning about languages is a fantastic way to springboard students into thinking with this perspective in mind. In time they can also begin to learn about cultural and social systems which is incredibly beneficial to students as they move through their education (Richardson, 2012).

 

 

Department of Education and Training. (2013). HSIE K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies, NSW.

 

Richardson, P. (2012). Teaching with a Global Perspective. Inquiry, 17(1), p. 43-50.

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