HSIE ES1: Families of the World.
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Remembering Lionsville

Remembering Lionsville | HSIE ES1: Families of the World. | Scoop.it
Lauren Bartlett's insight:

"This book is story of truth and challenge, that celebrates family, history and the way the past is linked to the present. The text reads as an oral narrative, as the author, Bronwyn Bancroft, shares her own indigenous family history as it was passed on to her, as she tells of family and place. There is connection with land, and we see the importance she places in knowing her place in the world. The text gives the reader a very personal history, inside the context of a wider indigenous history, as the values and events across Australia affect a family who live in an old house in Lionsville. The striking and bold detail in the illustrations, draw the reader’s eye to every inch of each double page spread. The inclusion of photos from the author's past gives an extra depth to the anecdotes woven through the text.
This book conveys strength and dignity in the midst of struggle, and ends with a genuine call to not be ignorant of your past, and of the influence that older generations have on your life. It gives way to discussions of the effect of white communities on indigenous family life" (York, 2013).

This book is an excellent tool for conveying indigenous perspectives and adheres to the criteria of appropriate cultural selection. It is written by an Aboriginal and is written after 1990, ensuring contemporary aboriginal input. It values the diversity of aboriginal cultures and uses appropriate terminology. (Aboriginal Education K-12)

This book is a great resource for discussing different groups, including family, school, social and community groups.

(CUES1, BOS, 2006) 
 
Activities: 
- Students discuss/ list differences and similarities of their own families and this book.
- Discuss different types of families.
- Have the children draw pictures of their own families.  
 
Assessment:
- Have the children interview their grandparents or an older family member at home. Ask them to find out about any special places, people or objects within their family. Find out about where their family members were born and what it was like. Have them to report/ present their findings back to the class. (CUES,1 BOS, 2006)


References:
Aboriginal Education K-12, Resource Guide. NSW Department of Health. 
http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/assets/pdf/aboriginalresourceguide.pdf 

Board of Studies NSW (BOS). (2006). Human Society and its environment K-6 Syllabus.  
www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au

York, K. (2013). Chairo Christian School. Review, Allen & Unwin.
http://www.allenandunwin.com/_uploads/BookPdf/TeachersReview/9781742373201.pdf

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Understanding Kinship

Understanding Kinship | HSIE ES1: Families of the World. | Scoop.it
Kinship has wide implications in Aboriginal life and social structure. All facets of life are influenced by it, including relations to ancestral beings, sites and land. That is to say, it is not restricted to one’s ‘family’ as might be expected by comparison with mainstream Australian norms.
Lauren Bartlett's insight:

This is a resource for teachers. It gives a clear overview of Kinship and provides teachers a base knowledge for discussing Aboriginal family groups with students. The 'family' structure in Aboriginal culture is different and it is important teachers are aware of this when discussing family groups with students of all ages.

The NLC's website provides a page giving a brief overview of Kinship and provides awareness on the topic, with links on the page to explore further topics. It relates to CUES1, 'describes the groups that individuals belong to, e.g. the class, the family group, friends, Aboriginal language group' (BOS, 2006). Terms on this page are appropriate in discussing with Early Stage 1 (ES1) eg. the calling of a 'brother' can mean more than one type of relationship and bond. Further exploration by teachers into Kinship is essential to provide efficient information to students throughout ES1 and beyond. It is also important to remember that each area is different and  that this site is based on Northern parts of Australia. This is a good starting point to gain awareness on the fact that there are differences and insight into simple terms used. Activities can be drawn from this topic and students can attempt to illustrate and explore some Aboriginal 'family' structures.

I have referred to the Aboriginal K-6 Resource Guide when assessing this online resource and determined it is a trustworthy source to access. The information provided on this site is authorised by a full Council consisting of 78 members elected from across the NLC’s seven regions and meets twice a year to provide leadership and policy directions and to ratify land use agreements. Key constituents of the NLC are traditional owners and the residents on Aboriginal lands.

References:
Aboriginal Education K-12, Resource Guide. NSW Department of Health. 
http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/assets/pdf/aboriginalresourceguide.pdf 

Northern Land Council Website
http://www.nlc.org.au/articles/cat/aboriginal-kinship/

 

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Photos From Around the World of Families and Their Possessions

Photos From Around the World of Families and Their Possessions | HSIE ES1: Families of the World. | Scoop.it

 

 

Lauren Bartlett's insight:

This link provides access to 13 beautiful and vibrant pictures of families and their homes from around the world. They could be used to demonstrate the differences between families and their possessions all over the world. Countries and cultures can be discussed and identified. The pictures can be shown to the class and a discussion can be had about what they think the pictures are about. Differences about family members, pets, possessions and homes can be identified and explored. Children can then draw a picture of their own home and possessions that can be shared in the class. Comparisons can be made by all of the students, providing the opportunity for them to explore the different family types and cultures within their own classroom. (BOS, NSW, 2006)

This resource can also generate questions from students, assessing and asking what they would further like to explore and learn about different family groups within the class and the world. Through this, a teacher demonstrates pedagogical content knowledge, providing an opportunity for inquiry teaching (Mishra & Koehler, 2006).

References:
Board of Studies NSW (BOS). (2006). Human Society and its environment K-6 Syllabus.  
www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au

Global Education Website http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/teaching-activity/who-are-the-families-of-the-world-f-2.html

Mishra, P., & Koehler, M. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College Record, (108)6, pp. 1017–1054.


 

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Film Clip: A Day in The Life of Lucy

Film Clip: A Day in The Life of Lucy | HSIE ES1: Families of the World. | Scoop.it
Lauren Bartlett's insight:

"This film clip introduces Lucy, who lives in rural Uganda with her adopted mother Doreen, and 9 brothers and sisters. In a typical day, Lucy helps her family by collecting water and firewood, helping to cook the family meal and feed the younger children, and playing with her siblings" (World Vision Australia).

This clip is an excellent visual  representation of a different family group. The students will be able to relate to Lucy in wanting to play with her siblings, however, will identify that there are many other things Lucy participates in at home, that may differ to their home and family structure. It shows a very different family structure and living environment. It allows all students to compare their own family with Lucy's family and draw on any differences or similarities on a global scale. Because this clip shows an array of circumstances Lucy has encountered, it is broad in helping students that don't have a "normal" family structure perhaps relate to a relationship or problem Lucy has had, e.g. adoption, death, single parent.

Activity:
- Have a 'storyboard' template printed and ready with six boxes to fill in.
- Ask the children to draw in the first 3 boxes on the top, 3 separate things that they found interesting about Lucy and her family. They can fill in pictures of what they saw, and write a sentence underneath, explaining what the picture is of from the clip. 
- In the bottom 3 boxes, the students can draw a picture underneath that shows something different or something the same as the picture above, but from their family at home. This compares their own characteristics with those of others (CUES1 BOS NSW 2006).
"Design-based activities provide a rich context for learning and lend themselves to sustained inquiry and revision." (Mishra & Koehler 2006) 

References:
Board of Studies NSW (BOS). (2006). Human Society and its environment K-6 Syllabus.  
www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au

Ewing, R. (2010). Literacy and the arts, in Christie, F., & Simpson, A. (Ed's) Literacy and social responsibility: Multiples Perspectives. London: Equinox. 

Mishra, P., & Koehler, M. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College Record, (108)6, pp. 1017–1054.

World Vision Australia http://www.worldvision.com.au/resources/SchoolResources/Content.aspx?id=a7ae2556-76de-468d-a073-8d8eb1808dc7

 

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Family Tree sheets

Family Tree sheets | HSIE ES1: Families of the World. | Scoop.it
Lauren Bartlett's insight:

This link provides access to sample templates to use as a guide of how to construct a basic Family Tree. They can be printed and handed out to students, or shown to the class just as a guide of how to construct a Family Tree. It can be a great tool in discussing the structure of a family and identify the links between any siblings, to their parents and the links between aunties, uncles, cousins and extended family. Using a Family Tree to draw connections provides students the opportunity to visually identify different types of family structures when compared to classmates. It is also a good task to do for teachers, as they can assess and gain awareness of what pre existing knowledge the students have about family structures and whether they have thought on a deeper level about the connections and meanings of family ties. 

Activity: (2006, BOS, CUES1)
- Students use a template or draw pictures of their family. In preparation to this activity, ask students to bring in a photo, if possible. Ask the children to label the template or the picture with the represented family member.
- After they have drawn their family, have them use a Family Tree template or draw another picture, structuring it like a Family Tree. Start from the student and branch out to parents and any siblings. If students are capable, have them continue on to Grandparents and possibly Aunties, Uncles, Cousins etc, if possible.
- Have the students form pairs and explain their picture to their partner and describe something special about the relationships or family members. Each child will then report back to the class. 
- As a whole class, discuss what it means to make a family. Use examples and assist the students to realise that families can be different from each other. (Browett & Ashman, 2008, p55)

Reference: 
Browett, J., & Ashman, G. (2008). Thinking Globally. Global Perspectives in the early years classroom. Education Services Australia. 

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