HSIE ENS1.5 Environment
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HSIE ENS1.5 Environment
The Globe as a representation of Earth.
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If the world were a village of 100

a visual presentation of the worlds statistics. If the world were condensed to just 100 people, what would it look like?** NOTE** the text in the beginning, ...
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TOP 10 REASONS Why We Know the Earth is Round

Subscribe to MinutePhysics - it's FREE! http://dft.ba/-minutephysics_sub MinutePhysics is on Google+ - http://bit.ly/qzEwc6 And facebook - http://facebook.co...
Kirsty's insight:

This is a video created by Minute Physics, while some of the concepts will be too advanced for the average stage 1 student it still provides an interesting way of explaining a difficult concept for many students, that the earth is round and not flat.  This lesson could begin with a discussion on the shape of the earth and its representation in maps. Students should be informed that while maps do offer a simplified view of the world and allow us to zoom in on specific areas they provide only a 2D representation of a 3D object and can often be misleading when viewing places on the world scale. Students could first look at various maps of the world and discuss how places can be skewed depending on what maps we look at.

 

Assessment: The teacher will show students the video; while it is playing they should write up on the board the reasons outlined in the video that we can test ourselves. As a class these can be discussed and students will then carry out fieldwork experiments to test the selected hypotheses.

E.g. View other planets and earth from space, this image shows the earth from space, as a sphere. It is also created in real time and so students can click any place in the world and see what it looks like from space at that very minute. This can therefore also test time zones and day and night occurring at different places in the world at different times.

http://www.fourmilab.ch/cgi-bin/Earth?imgsize=1024&opt=-l&lat=22.375&ns=North&lon=-61.8333&ew=West&alt=149249513&img=learth.evif -

To view the stars in different places in the world students can view http://www.wikisky.org/ a site that allows you to choose a place in the world from which you can view the stars in the night sky, students can observe how the night sky looks different in different places in the world.

Students can go outside and draw what they can see on the horizon, they can also do this at home and from different areas and compare their findings to the hypothesis in the video.

 

Strategies: This teaching point introduces the concept of both two and three-dimensional objects and allows students to recognise how and where these shapes occur in our natural environment (SGS1.1), students are also introduced briefly to the concept of angles, as well as using graphic tools and manipulating images on the computer (SGS1.2).

 

Fieldwork works as an ‘indispensable opportunity to apply concepts and inquiry methodology in a practical and holistic manner in real environments’ (Gilbert & Hoepper 2004). It allows students to reinforce what they have learnt in the classroom through ‘practical application of theory, inquiry based learning and experiential thinking’ (Cranby 2002 in Gilbert & Hoepper 2004).  Moreover, research has indicated that primary school students’ understanding of the shape of the world varies with many supporting a ‘flat earth’ or ‘dual earth’ model. Allowing students to test new information places learning in an interactive and inquiry based environment, this means that children can activate and evaluate their previous knowledge on the subject and challenge that knowledge in light of new information in turn creating a holistic, student centred learning experience. The inquiry approach has the advantage that ‘kids will want to learn the answers and will become more energized to overcome any skill deficiencies to achieve that goal’ (Morino Institute 2012).

Understanding that the earth is a sphere is an abstract concept for many students, and so while allowing them to test hypotheses like the ones above will not allow them to completely understand the concept of a round earth and how and why this is but it will begin to deconstruct ‘scientifically inaccurate or incomplete conceptions about the world’ (Clement, 1982; Henriques, 2002; Osborne & Wittrock, 1983; Posner et al., 1982 in Ozsoy 2012) that children formulate.
 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia

 

Ozsoy, (2012) Is the Earth Flat or Round?

Primary School Children’s Understandings of the Planet Earth: The Case of Turkish Children.

 

Morino Institute (2012) Education Development Center.  How to: Inquiry The YouthLearn Initiative at EDC. http://www.youthlearn.org/learning/planning/lesson-planning/how-inquiry/how-inquiry


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There's a Map on My Lap!: All About Maps

Reading from the book "There's a Map on My Lap!: All about Maps" by Tish Rabe, Aristides Ruiz (Illustrator) From the Cat in the Hat's Learning Library Voice:...
Kirsty's insight:

There’s a map on my lap is a book by Dr Suess created to introduce the concept of map reading to young children. This book could be effectively used as stimuli for a lesson on map reading and making maps. Asking structured questions about the text and its content during and after reading means the teacher can ensure that students are engaged in literal, inferential and critical thinking (Hill 2006 in Winch 2010) and that the whole learner is engaged in making meaning of the text.

 

Assessment task: Children draw their own maps of the playground, classroom, their bedroom or another reasonably sized area complete with a key. Students can be shown example maps from National Geographic society to help them with their map making. http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/maps/maps-and-models/?ar_a=1

 

Strategies: Students are effectively using maps as a visual text and so they are introduced to the concept that texts are made for a variety of reasons (RS1.8). Students are also encouraged to recognise and explore that text structures and conventions can vary depending on the purpose of the text (WS1.13).

 

‘Maps are the most significant tool of a geographer’ (Gilbert & Hoepper 2004 p.266). It is therefore imperative that students are introduced to maps and map reading at a young age for which this resource is perfect. Through the vocabulary used this text seeks to familiarize children with geographical terms, it is also written in true Dr Suess style with a catchy rhyme that encourages students to join in on the reading.  In addition, for young learners the best forms of assessment are those that allow students to ‘show what they can do’ (Gilbert & Hoepper 2004) in a non-confronting manner through informal test activities that allow for feedback on learning (Ur 1996). Map making activities as described above allow for such assessment of learning

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

Ur, P. (1996). A Course in Language Teaching. Practice and Theory. Cambridge Teacher Training and Development. Cambridge University press.

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy : reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

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Dual naming to recognise Aboriginal history - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Dual naming to recognise Aboriginal history - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | HSIE ENS1.5 Environment | Scoop.it
The Aboriginal community says a move to a dual naming policy for Tasmanian landmarks is long overdue.
Kirsty's insight:

This is a video on Dual naming of places, roads and tourist signs in Tasmania to recognise Aboriginal history and align them with the rest of Australia.  This video can be used to introduce students to the history of Australia and the concept of Aboriginal relationship to the land. On the same ABC website Indigenous land maps are provided http://www.abc.net.au/indigenous/map/, this map can be viewed with the video to familiarize students with Aboriginal Australia. The indigenous section of the ABC site can be explored further as a class as it provides excellent resources for exploring and understanding Indigenous communities and Indigenous life.

 

Assessment: A circle of viewpoints (Harvard Project Zero).

Students should first brainstorm views on this topic, the teacher can direct conversation by opening discussion with the pretext ‘How does the issue look from different points in space and different points in time?’

Who (and what) is affected by it? Who is involved? Who might care? (Harvard Project Zero).

Students should be instructed to each choose a person who could have a perspective on the issue and consider the thoughts and feelings of that character. (An aboriginal child, a local non-indigenous member of the community etc.) Students can then take turns voicing their opinion on the matter. As a class discuss what students have learnt, what new ideas do you have on the matter? Do you have any questions about the matter?

 

Strategies:  As this task is highly discussion based it effectively addresses communication outcomes as it allows students to ask questions to clarify their understanding, listen to their peers, participate in group discussion as well as work on their oral presentation skills (TS1.2, TS1.1).

 

Allowing students to explore the topic in this manner is an excellent way to introduce and discuss what can emerge as a sensitive topic. It ‘helps students consider different and diverse perspectives involved in and around a topic’ (Harvard Project Zero) and allows them to understand and explore how and why people may think and feel differently about various issues. In addition, this activity is ideal for indigenous students as it gives them chance for their cultural identity to be explored and affirmed and insure they feel included and accepted in the school context (Racism, No way 2005). This is especially important as was expressed by Boston (1996) ‘The Department of School Education is committed to promoting the educational achievements of Aboriginal students and to enhancing the knowledge and understanding of all students about Aboriginal Australia’ (NSW DET 2003). Finally the resource incorporates Aboriginal content accurately and shows the support of indigenous peoples as well as having a contemporary focus in turn avoiding reinforcing dated stereotypes of Indigenous people inherited from a colonial past (NSW DET 2003).

 

Boston, K (1996) Director-General’s Statement in Aboriginal Education Policy. Sydney. NSW Department of School Education 1996

 

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2003). Aboriginal Education K-12 Resource Guide. Sydney, NSW: Author

 

Racism. No Way. (2005). Understanding Racism. The extend of racism in Australian schools.

 

 

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MapMaker Interactive

Use our tools to explore the world, learn about human and physical patterns, and make your own maps.
Kirsty's insight:

This is a Website run by the National Geographic Society which features an interactive map-maker. It has many features and map making can progress from very simple community, playground or classroom maps to those of the whole world. This website could be used in the classroom to introduce children to the prospect of maps initially and how the world looks on a large scale. As students skill levels progress drop down menu’s allow the student to zoom in on any Continent or country and a side bar allows them to explore the features of both physical and human systems as well as the impact of environment related issues across the world.

 

Assessment: Children can explore map-making with ICT. In groups students can explore the features of a country somewhere across the world, children can experiment with the drop down menus’ and create a short presentation on what they have found, the site also offers easy to access comprehensive videos on people and places across the world that students can use to complete their country profiles.

http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/kids/people-places-kids/

 

Strategies: Numeracy strategies incorporated include using symbols and pictures to represent objects and interpreting information pictorial information (DS1.1) as well as introducing students to the concept of measurement in estimating, measuring, comparing and recording area (MS1.2).

 

As expressed by Gilbert & Hoepper (2004) technology ‘ increases the ability of students to manipulate, represent, analyse and evaluate information about place in a more efficient, effective way and often with a greater degree of representational accuracy (p.250). It is therefore important, especially when learning about the world on a larger scale to allow students carry out their learning interactive online environment, it allows students to see the world represented in an abstract way making it easier for them to manipulate and explore. 

 

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IEJEE_4_2_Ozsoy_407_415.pdf

Kirsty's insight:

This is an article outlining children’s’ misconceptions about the structure of the earth. It discusses where these misconceptions arise are how to challenge them in a way that will allow children to understand what is in fact quite a complex scientific process.

 

This article would be used to plan a hands-on lesson revolving around the earth as a sphere in order to explain why it is we use the globe as a representation of our earth. As discussed in the article often children are asked to draw representations of the earth to show their understanding of the formation of the earth and where we live on it and this acts as a barrier stopping students from thinking in terms of the world being three-dimensional object. I would with a discussion with the students on their understanding of planet earth followed by allowing each student to construct their own three-dimensional globe out of play-dough. Using this material also introduces students to the concept that the earth is not hollow and that land mass rises above the ocean.

 

Assessment: Assessment of students understanding of this concept would be done as is outlined in the article through discussion, asking the students what they have done and why they have made the choices they have. The teacher can use this as a basis to gauge students understanding and direct further learning. 

 

Strategies: This task utilizes the numeracy strategies related to three-dimensional space through using materials to represent and discuss a three-dimensional object (SGS1.1).

 

This article is a good source to be used by educators struggling to determine how to best help students understand the concept of a round earth, it emphasizes the importance of  knowing children’s (pre-) conceptions as these ‘will provide the teachers information about the children’s mental models that they have constructed before the instruction’ (Ozsoy 2012) and that this allows them to structure future learning that builds upon prior conceptions so learning is aligned with students current knowledge on the topic and quality learning experiences are created.

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