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Systematic thinking - Six Thinking Hats

Systematic thinking - Six Thinking Hats | Primary teaching ideas | Scoop.it

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Hanieh Akbarimehr's curator insight, April 17, 2014 2:31 AM

Star!

Viraj Athavale's curator insight, September 3, 2014 1:38 AM

Great approach!! Must to adapt for decision making in corporate life as well as day-to-day life!! I recommend this to all!!

Jennifer's curator insight, April 13, 2016 9:12 AM
critical thinking

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ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map

ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map | Primary teaching ideas | Scoop.it

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Convict Lives

Convict Lives | Primary teaching ideas | Scoop.it
Stories of convict transportation to Australia, from the collections of the State Library of New South Wales.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, February 3, 2015 6:50 PM

Teaching about convicts? Check out the array of online digital resources on this State Library NSW Pinterest board.

Catherine Smyth's curator insight, February 3, 2015 6:53 PM

Teaching about convicts? Check out this wonderful range of online digital resources on the NSW State Library Pinterest board

Jennifer Ryan's curator insight, February 6, 2015 6:46 AM

Records of Australian convicts are becoming much more available ... This relates to. NSW

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Asian stories, folk tales and life

Asian stories, folk tales and life | Primary teaching ideas | Scoop.it
Picture books in the library (K - 2) that could be used in support of the Australian Curriculum Asian perspective.

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Alexis King's curator insight, July 25, 2013 4:58 AM

Picture books that link to the Australian Curriculum from an Asian perspective. Brilliant.

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Australian Money for your SMART Board » primaryedutech.com

Australian Money for your SMART Board » primaryedutech.com | Primary teaching ideas | Scoop.it
Download a Notebook file that you can use when you next time do a money unit using your Smartboard. It includes pictures of both sides of all the Australian coins and notes. This clipart is very handy for developing your own Notebook money resources.

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Madeleine Gratsounas's insight:

Helpful resource for teaching money

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Alexis King's curator insight, April 13, 2014 9:42 PM

Integrate Money Exchange and Numeracy.

Kate Molloy's curator insight, April 8, 2015 12:36 AM

This is a SMART Board resource that can be downloaded to add another dimension to interactive and visual learning.  A SMART board can simply be defined as a white board displaying the image from a computer monitor with the surface operating as a massive touch screen (Blue & Tirotta, 2011). Interactive Whiteboards have made it possible for students to 'interact, simulate, collaborate, and document learning experiences and real world problem solving (Blue et al, 2011).

 

This resource is particularly valuable to Early Stage 1 because 5-6 year olds require considerable scaffolding and teacher modelling (Preston & Mowbray, 2008). Smart Boards are beneficial as they provide support for several difference learning styles; visual, auditory and kinaesthetic. Additionally, the physical involvement of touching screens and moving objects and watching videos increase student’s attention and enjoyment (Preston et al, 2008).

 

References:

 Blue, E., & Tirotta, R. (2011). The benefits & drawbacks of integrating cloud computing and interactive whiteboards in teacher preparation.

 

TechTrends, 55(3), 31-39. Preston, C., & Mowbray, L. (2008). Use of SMART Boards for teaching, learning and assessment in kindergarten science. Teaching Science, 54(2), 50-53.

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Grid Multiplication

Grid Multiplication | Primary teaching ideas | Scoop.it

A good flash primary maths activity which help students learn how to use the grid method of multiplication.
http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Maths

Madeleine Gratsounas's insight:

Interactive activity would be great for teaching multiplication strategies

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Global Perspective on people who meet needs- World Vision Australia

Global Perspective on people who meet needs- World Vision Australia | Primary teaching ideas | Scoop.it
Madeleine Gratsounas's insight:

ES1 Change and Continuity - Significant Events and People.            CCES1: Describes events and retells stories that demonstrate their own heritage and the heritage of others. 

 

Student resource:

This resource is a poster/image from the World Vision website, which shows a global perspective about concepts of significant people and basic needs. This resource would be great to use to create a discussion when using an inquiry approach as students can investigate people who meet needs and how they meet children’s needs in another country. At the start of the lesson, recap what our needs are and specifically point out food as a need and who provides food for us. This would include family members, people who work at a grocery store and farmers. After looking at the poster/image, ask the students to identify who meets Santos’s needs and compare people who meet their own needs and how. Students could write down their ideas using a table format with the headings, ‘Who meets my needs’ in one column and ‘Who meets Santos’s needs’ in another column in pairs. To further develop their understanding, you could use more World Vision posters from other countries to explore this topic.

 

This resource and lesson idea allows early stage 1 students to develop skills involving acquiring information through viewing an image, listening to others and talking about their ideas (NSW Board of Studies, 1998; Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011). Social and civic participation skills are developed at a basic level by participating in class activities and class discussions that involve inquiring into a different country and the way needs are met there (NSW Board of Studies, 1998). Also, comparison skills are developed through comparing what they have learnt, to their own life and personal experiences (Taylor, Fahey, Kriewaldt, Boon, 2012). This teaches early stage 1 students about diversity and promotes a social understanding and critical inquiry approach about people, lifestyles and the way basic needs are met in other parts of the world (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).

 

Board of Studies NSW (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Taylor,T., Fahey, C., Kriewaldt,J. & Boon,D. (2012). Place and time. Australia: Pearson Australia. 

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Interactive whiteboard resource- Wants and Needs

Interactive whiteboard resource- Wants and Needs | Primary teaching ideas | Scoop.it
Students can identify the differences between wants and needs.
Madeleine Gratsounas's insight:

ES1 Change and Continuity - Significant Events and People.            CCES1: Describes events and retells stories that demonstrate their own heritage and the heritage of others. 

 

Student resource:

This is a great resource for early stage 1 students as it is interactive, engaging, highlights what our basic needs are in order to survive and also has a great song at the end, which the students can sing to. This resource gives students the opportunity to learn information about needs and wants and to be able to effectively distinguish the difference between the two categories, which is very important for this topic. When each need is spoken about, ask questions such as “Who provides food for you?” Where do they buy the food from?” “Is there somebody who has helped you with this need in the past?” “Who has provided clothes for you?” These types of questions will help students to think about the people who have met their needs in the past (and present), which could include family members, extended family members as well as other people in the community such as grocery store workers, shopping centre workers and farmers.

 

To further develop the topic, you could promote the idea that they can be actively involved in meeting their needs by thinking about ways they can help the people who meet their needs. This will help develop the concept of participation where they can be involved in helping to meet their needs (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011). To assess what the students have learnt, you could provide them with an activity where they have to classify pictures into needs and wants and cut and paste them into their correct category.

 

The use of an interactive white board resource allows students develop their digital literacy and ICT skills (Winch, 2011). Also, it assists the development of skills such as organising, classifying and sorting information they have learnt through being able to interact with information and physically move pictures into their categories (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy: reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

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Road To Refuge

Road To Refuge | Primary teaching ideas | Scoop.it
Before we make our minds up about asylum seekers in Australia, we need to dig a little deeper. Take a Road to Refuge journey and challenge yourself – what would you do if you were in the shoes of a refugee?

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, September 23, 2014 9:57 PM

Information and resources for understanding and teaching about refugees.

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A day in the life of a convict

A day in the life of a convict | Primary teaching ideas | Scoop.it
A convict’s life depended on who they worked for, where they worked and the kind of skills they had to offer.

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Maria Kritsotakis's curator insight, April 3, 2014 8:25 AM

Along with the British Colonisation of Australia came the convicts too. No longer accepted in America after The War of Independence ended, NSW was the answer to the problem for Britain.This site from Sydney Living Museums in conjunction with Historical Houses Trust of NSW focuses on convict life at Hyde Park Barracks. Hyde Park Barracks is heritage listed as one of the most significant convict sites in the world.This is an excellent resource for teachers and students. Children will enjoy this site which includes lots of photos, clear and concise accounts of the daily life of the convicts, actual newspaper articles about them and videos . Excursions can be  arranged to Hyde Park Barracks to visit the convict museum which runs educational programs that are directed at stage 2 and 3 and are  aligned with the HSIE curriculum.

 

There are numerous teaching activities that can be inspired by this subject. Recording the differences between a convicts clothing and our own today looking at the food they ate and  the food we eat, setting up a mock trial in small groups and determining punishments for the crimes, are but a few suggestions. For a more formal assessment children could research female convicts ( as Hyde Park Barracks was home to male convicts only) and present their findings to the class in a short five minute oral presentation where they would report on the female convicts clothing, crime and punishment, what type of labour they were sentenced to and what became of them if and when they were released ( The National Library of Australia, 2014).

 

 

References.

 

The National Library of Australia. (2014). Retrieved from

Treasure Explorer http://treasure-explorer.nla.gov.au/explore/treasures

Kimberley Barcenilla's curator insight, May 31, 7:37 PM
This resource provides a curriculum-based program that is focused on student-centred learning where students are able to discover and explore the historical evidence by exploring the heritage site of Hyde Park Barracks. 

- Gives student's an opportunity to investigate primary sources in an extremely tangible and interactive way.
- First hand stories from convicts who lived at the barracks, developing skills in empathetic understanding      
- Concrete way to stimulate curiosity.
- The opportunity to combine student-lived experiences with imaginative reconstruction which can help develop a capacity to use evidence in reasoned argument in disciplinary inquiry (Taylor et al., 2012, pp. 151)
- Differing views: life for convicts versus life for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people
- Investigate the impact of convict settlement on Indigenous people.
- Opportunity for students to see, think and wonder.


What do you think was here before the barracks?


Outcomes:

- Describes people, events and actions related to world exploration and its effects (HT2-3)
- Applies skills of historical inquiry and communication (HT2-5)
- Stories of the First Fleet, including reasons for the journey, who travelled to Australia, and their experiences following arrival (ACHHK079)


References:

Taylor, T., Fahey, C., Kriewaldt, J. & Boon, D. (2012). Place and Time. Explorations in Teaching Geography and History. Frenchs Forest: Pearson Australia
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What the World Eats, Part I - Photo Essays

What the World Eats, Part I - Photo Essays | Primary teaching ideas | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

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Alexis King's curator insight, April 29, 2013 4:46 AM

A picture gallery displaying different families around the world and their weekly consumption of food.

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KidsCanMakeADifference.org - Home

KidsCanMakeADifference.org - Home | Primary teaching ideas | Scoop.it
Inspiring kids to end hunger and poverty in their communities, their country, and their world.

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Alexis King's curator insight, July 25, 2013 5:05 AM

Teaching children to be good global citizens and to make a difference in the world.Kids Take Action!

 

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savewater.com.au - Interactive eBooks for students in early Primary School

savewater.com.au - Interactive eBooks for students in early Primary School | Primary teaching ideas | Scoop.it
Interactive eBooks for students in early Primary School that can be read by teachers, parents, and children

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saving water resource

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Alexis King's curator insight, April 14, 2014 5:51 AM

e books - The need for Water.

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Indigenous perspective: Family - Australian Museum

Indigenous perspective: Family - Australian Museum | Primary teaching ideas | Scoop.it
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have a complex system of family relations, where each person knows their kin and their land.
Madeleine Gratsounas's insight:

ES1 Change and Continuity - Significant Events and People.            CCES1: Describes events and retells stories that demonstrate their own heritage and the heritage of others. 

 

Teacher Resource:

This resource is a webpage about Indigenous families from the Australian Museum website. The information provided involves Indigenous complex family relations, extended relationships in terms of kinship systems, importance and respect for elders and their family ties within their community. It emphasises that the whole community has concern and takes care of Indigenous children, not just the parents. The website is a valuable resource for teachers to use as background knowledge as it is up to date, acknowledges the diversity of Indigenous cultures, uses appropriate terminology and includes quotes from Indigenous people (NSW Department of Education and Training, Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate, 2003). This emphasises this resource’s authenticity and accuracy and highlights Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participation, which is very important in teaching Indigenous perspectives (NSW Department of Education and Training, Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate, 2003).

 

Teachers can use the information provided as background knowledge to plan lessons that involve investigating how Indigenous children’s needs are met through their family members and their community and compare this to the students’ personal experiences with people who meet their needs. This could be done through a literacy activity where the class and teacher jointly construct a comparison table. This gives students the opportunity to learn information about Indigenous families, think about the concept of families and significant people who meet needs through an Indigenous perspective and develop comparison skills (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).  Also, it allows any students in the classroom who may have an Indigenous background to be able to learn content that is relevant to themselves, therefore making their learning more meaningful (Harrison, 2011).

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

NSW Department of Education and Training, Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate. (2003). Aboriginal k-12 resource guide. Retrieved March 26, 2014 from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/assets/pdf/aboriginalresourceguide.pdf

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

 

 

 

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The Family Song- YouTube

Busy Beavers iPhone App: http://tinyurl.com/44doo3h Website: http://BusyBeavers.com - Kids English Learning Resources - MP3s, Worksheets, Flash Cards, Games ...
Madeleine Gratsounas's insight:

ES1 Change and Continuity - Significant Events and People.            CCES1: Describes events and retells stories that demonstrate their own heritage and the heritage of others. 

 

Student Resource:

This resource is a catchy song for early stage 1, which highlights the concept of significant people such as family and extended family members. In early stage 1, students need engaging resources; therefore a song relevant to their age group with a catchy beat is great to get students engaged and interested. This song can be used to investigate an inquiry question such as “Who has met our needs in the past?” Using an inquiry approach allows students to learn information about needs and significant people and relate the information to their own personal life (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011)

 

Use this song to conduct a class discussion by asking students to describe situations when they were babies, toddlers and young children where family members have met a particular need or done something important for them. Prior to this, it is important to have already learnt about what basic needs are. Through giving students the opportunity to describe situations, this allows students to draw on personal experiences in their past which is important for younger students (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).

 

As an independent literacy activity, which could be used to assess understanding, students could draw two family members and write a sentence describing what those family members have done to meet their needs in the past. An effective writing strategy would be to give examples and model writing the sentence. This activity and strategy enables students to effectively develop their writing skills, as they are able to write a sentence based on content they have spoken about (Winch, 2011). Also, the use of this resource and teaching idea, gives students the opportunity to develop their oral language and writing skills as well as skills that involve acquiring information through listening and talking to others (Board of Studies NSW, 1998).

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy: reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

 

Board of Studies NSW (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

 

 

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WatchKnowLearn - Educational video about community helpers

WatchKnowLearn - Educational video about community helpers | Primary teaching ideas | Scoop.it
Free K-12 educational videos … organized. Tens of thousands of excellent, educational videos in a huge, intuitive directory. Organized, reviewed, rated, and described by teachers. Ideal as a supplement to a curriculum or for independent study. Designed for teachers, students, parents, homeschoolers, educators … and all life-long learners!
Madeleine Gratsounas's insight:

ES1 Change and Continuity - Significant Events and People.           CCES1: Describes events and retells stories that demonstrate their own heritage and the heritage of others. 

 

Student resource:

This resource is an educational video about community helpers and is great for early stage 1 students as it has real life images with children around their age. The video has a narrator who talks about various community helpers and what they do to help people in the community.

 

This video could be used to introduce a lesson on people in the community and to inquiry into “Who meets my needs?” After viewing the video, create a class list using the interactive white board of all the community helpers from the video and list any more they can think of. Prompt the students where necessary to help them think of as many as they can through questions. Create a class discussion by asking students to describe events or situations where one of those community helpers on the list has helped them meet some of their needs in the past. It is important that the students have been taught what needs are prior to this. As an independent activity, provide students with pictures of people in the community and short sentences describing what need they provide and get students to match the pictures with the sentences.  Show students some examples on the interactive whiteboard and then allow students to independently work on their activity. Also, you could plan excursions to various places in the community for example, a shopping centre, post office or bakery to further explore the topic and engage with the community.

 

An assessment strategy could be to ask students to present an oral presentation describing three people in the community and situations or event in the past where those community helpers have helped them in the past. This resource and teaching idea, develops literacy skills including viewing, listening, talking, describing, reading and matching (Winch, 2011). Also, it develops skills in HSIE involving acquiring information and learning about society and community roles and responsibilities by acknowledging what people in the community do or have done, to help meet their needs (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011; Board of Studies NSW, 1998).

 

Board of Studies NSW. (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy: reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

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