HSIE Early Stage 1 - Cultures
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HSIE Early Stage 1 - Cultures
Online resources for teaching "special events we celebrate" to Early Stage 1
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Photo of the Day: Celebrations - National Geographic

Photo of the Day: Celebrations - National Geographic | HSIE Early Stage 1 - Cultures | Scoop.it

The National Geographic Photo of the Day displays photographs from around the world. The Celebrations gallery shows photographs specifically of celebrations around the world, which is especially appropriate for teaching special events to children in HSIE. Many of the photos are very striking and will engage students in discovering the reason for celebration and the history behind the practice or decorations shown.

 

BRINGING IT INTO THE CLASSROOM:

 

Use the photos as a stimulus for small case studies into world celebrations. You could combine this with the idea of a multicultural calendar and use photos to support having a look at what is happening around the world each day. Otherwise, you can use them on their own as the basis or stimulus point of their own lessons.

 

TEACHING IDEAS:

 

- Show the photos to the class and discuss some of them. Talk about what they think is happening in the photos and whether anyone has experienced or seen the practices before. This could be done in combination with a class multicultural calendar.

- Allow students to choose their favourite photo from the selection. Give them a copy of the picture, and ask them to glue it onto some paper. Have them write why they like that photo – does it look nice? Do the participants look like they are having fun? Are they reminded of any of their own life events?

- To extend the above activity, reveal to students in a second lesson what the event is. As a scaffolded or homework research assignment, have students find three interesting facts about the special event they chose. They can present their findings as school news for that week, possibly with 3 research points – what the event is for, what they do to celebrate it, and what the student likes about it.

 

LITERACY STRATEGY:

 

Students develop their talking and written literacy skills in the suggested activity above. Teachers can provide students with a template for students to fill out with the above 3 research points, to encourage an understanding of text structure and organization. The student can then use this to aid them in communicating their findings to the class.

 

ASSESSMENT STRATEGY:

 

Use the student’s written response, and oral response to the special event to observe their knowledge and understanding, their skills, and their values. Informal questioning can be used to aid the teacher during writing or news time.

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Traditional Chinese Masks and Culture

Traditional Chinese Masks and Culture | HSIE Early Stage 1 - Cultures | Scoop.it

Chinese New Year masks are a traditional display in China. As part of the new Australian Curriculum, Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia is a prioritized context for learning (ACARA, 2013). Among the organizing ideas around which to arrange learning refers to the diversity in traditions, cultures and belief systems of the peoples and countries of Asia (OS.1). This resource provides cultural information about the use of masks in China, a tradition whose survival is most evident during Chinese New Year. It includes information as thorough as mentioning different materials that are used in mask-making.

 

BRINGING IT INTO THE CLASSROOM:

 

A possible choice for a global perspective on special events is to incorporate Chinese New Year into your teaching. This can be integrated into Creative Arts and students can work on creating their own Chinese New Year masks. Make sure this is done in the context of deeper learning about Chinese culture so that mask-making does use the form of stereotypical inspiration, and doesn’t represent tokenism.

 

TEACHING IDEAS:

-       Have a look at Chinese New Year masks and pictures of Chinese New Year with your students using visual postcards, a powerpoint or similar. Talk about what the masks look like, what they look like they are made of, which ones they like, and the effect they have.

-       Work on creating Chinese New Year masks. For kindergarten, this will require scaffolding. Teachers possibly will want to provide the shape of the masks and children can decorate and paint them. For older stages, mask-making can be more complex.

-       Support learning about Chinese New Year with picture books depicting the celebration of Chinese New Year either in China or outside of China.

 

LITERACY STRATEGY:

 

The picture book “D is for Dragon Dance” by Ying Chang Compestine is an alphabet book displaying associated activities and symbols for Chinese New Year. The book can be used to support learning of the alphabet and phonetics and is especially appropriate due to Chinese New Year taking place at the beginning of the year when readers are at their earliest stages in school.

 

ASSESSMENT STRATEGY:

 

Observe for student engagement in mask-making. What kind of techniques have they been inspired to use after looking at Chinese masks and art? Do they use particular colours or materials? Ask them about why they are designing their mask the way they are and engage in informal questioning about unit content. Ask questions that reveal their knowledge and understanding, acquirement of skills, and development of values.

 

REFERENCES:

 

ACARA (2013). Asia and Australia's engagement with Asia. In The Australian Curriculum. Retrieved April 20, 2013. From http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/CrossCurriculumPriorities/Asia-and-Australias-engagement-with-Asia

 

Compestine, Y. (2006). D is for Dragon. New York: Holiday House. 

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Dust Echoes

Dust Echoes | HSIE Early Stage 1 - Cultures | Scoop.it

The Dust Echo series is a collection of Aboriginal Dreamtime stories collected from the Wugularr (Beswick) Community in Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory. The series was created the ABC with the Djilpin Arts Aboriginal Corporation. Each is captivating to watch and perfect for the primary classroom. It is especially important to embed Indigenous perspectives into teaching and learning, and Indigenous resources should be used at the curriculum level whenever possible (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).

 

BRINGING IT INTO THE CLASSROOM:

 

Using the focus question “why do we celebrate things?” explore with your Early Stage 1 class the reasons behind special events we celebrate. Most special events and celebrations stem traditionally from beliefs that a group of people share. While celebrations take different forms, the reasons for them are similar for most of us. The goal of the learning experience is to identify the similarities and differences between the ways students in the class celebrate (CUES1).

 

Begin this exploration starting with special events most relevant to the members of your class. The comparison and discussion of specific events will differ depending on the diversity and cultures of your students. A commonly celebrated, though not universal, special event relevant to kindergarten children is their birthday. Explore with your students how the celebration of birthdays began. It’s interesting to find that most common celebrations stem from current or past beliefs.

 

Finding the common reasons behind celebrations helps make a connection and a recognition of similarity between your Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students. The reason for Aboriginal ceremonies and celebrations are spiritual and cultural, and many ceremonies ensure vital components of the lores and The Dreaming remain intact (Queensland Study Authority, 2008). From this perspective, a Christian family would be the same in that they celebrate Christmas because of their religious beliefs.

 

Use these videos for your students to have a look at some of the Dreamtime stories of the Wugularr people. These are the beliefs of this group of Aboriginal people and a reason for some of their celebrations, and similarly, many other cultural groups have their own beliefs behind their special events. In this way, it can be highlighted to your kindergarten students that while our celebratory practices may differ, we all share similar reasons for engaging in celebrations.

 

TEACHING IDEAS:

 

- Using the form of picture books, discussion, or media, look at the beliefs behind a selection of special events celebrated by students in your classroom. These could include Christmas, Easter, Chinese New Year, Hanukkah, etc.

- Have students go home and ask their families about the different reasons they celebrate a chosen or suggested special event, and what they do to celebrate it.

- Make a collage about different celebrations celebrated by students in the classroom.

- Watch one (or more if desired) Dust Echo video which tells a Dreamtime story or belief of the Wugullar people. Extend this experience to emphasize that Aboriginal people celebrate their beliefs as well. Use quality picture books to show the importance of dance and song in Aboriginal culture.

 

ASSESSMENT STRATEGY:

 

Outcome to assess - CUES1 (Communicates some common characteristics that all people share, as well as some of the differences)

 

- Skills – students complete a simple survey with their family at home about the ways they celebrate a specific event at home. Students create a poster displaying the different things class members celebrate.

- Knowledge and understanding – students fill out a simple 2-part sheet, identifying what is similar, and what is different, about the ways they and a partner celebrate an event.

- Values and attitudes – teachers observe through class discussion.

 

LITERACY STRATEGY:

 

The Dust Echo story "Whirlpool" tells the legend about why the fresh-water people near the Limmen Byte River never make a sound. There is no narration or dialogue, however the story is still clear. Have children write about why the freshwater people don't make a sound, or as a class, use still-images from the video and write a sentence below each to tell the story in words.

 

SELECTION OF RESOURCES:

 

The Dust Echoes series is appropriate for teaching in the classroom. They are recent and created using the expertise of the Djilpin Arts Aboriginal Corporation, located in Beswick, where the Wugularr people live. The videos encourage no negative or incorrect stereotypes, and the animations are positive and accurate portrayals of Aboriginal people. The videos and stories are suitable and equally engaging to people of all backgrounds. Teachers should make sure to express to their students that the videos represent Dreamtime stories of the Wugularr people, and do not represent the way that all Aboriginal peope live today.

 

REFERENCES:

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning.

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University of Rochester: Multicultural Calendar 2013

University of Rochester: Multicultural Calendar 2013 | HSIE Early Stage 1 - Cultures | Scoop.it

The cultures outcome in Early Stage 1 aims to have students recognize that as people, we all share common characteristics as well as differences. Why not develop a multicultural world calendar for your class to encourage a value for diversity and to emphasize the fact that all people celebrate for similar reasons, though our celebratory practices may be different!

 

BRINGING IT INTO THE CLASSROOM:

 

The University of Rochester has developed a Multicultural Calendar for 2013 with a range of events that can be the inspiration of lessons and discussions with your kindergarten class. To make it most relevant to your students, why not create a calendar showing the birthdays for your whole class, and for at least a term, have a look each day at whether it is someone’s birthday, or a multicultural event. Have students share the way they are celebrating their birthday this year, and have a look at how people around the world are celebrating the event of the day! Throughout the whole term, you are communicating to your students, and helping them understand, that people have the common characteristic of celebrating, whether for belief, family or other values important to them, and we all celebrate in ways that are diverse and valuable.

 

TEACHING IDEAS:

 

- Create a multicultural calendar as a class. To get students involved in researching, you could make a collaborated project with the senior buddy classes, or have students find information at home with their families. Display the finished calendar on the classroom wall, or even somewhere on display for the school.

- Display a multicultural calendar beside the class birthday list. Each day, have a look to see if it’s someone’s birthday or a special celebration somewhere in the world. Have a look at a video, photos, or a picture book to explore how that event is celebrated. If anyone in the class celebrates the specific event, encourage them to share their experiences.

 

ASSESSMENT STRATEGY:

While completing their calendar, question students about what the calendar shows. Ask students about which special events they celebrate and whether they think many people celebrate other diverse events. Students can answer questions about a simple pictogram (based on the numeracy strategy below) which shows the events celebrated by the people in a kindergarten class.

 

NUMERACY STRATEGY:

Have students survey the class to tally how many people celebrate certain events. Use knowledge of the cultures of your students to include special events that represent the specific diversity of your class. As a class, create a graph showing how many students celebrate each event in the classroom. Include special events that are specific to certain cultures and close to universal in your class (for example, birthdays). You could choose to create a simple graph that shows how much each special event is celebrated in Australia in a whole to show students the diversity that exists in Australia.

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Anti-prejudice activities for Kindergarten children - Prejudice. No Way!

Anti-prejudice activities for Kindergarten children - Prejudice. No Way! | HSIE Early Stage 1 - Cultures | Scoop.it

With the goal of students understanding that as people we all share common characteristics and differences (CUES1), it is important to educate students to be appreciative of diversity and unprejudiced. The NSW Department of Education and Communities’ (2012) Prejudice No Way website provides a number of resources for all stages to educate students in way that counters racism, prejudice and discrimination. Gilbert & Hoepper (2011) point out that antiracist education is necessary to encourage a sense of multiculturalism, especially in building woards cultural request and social equity.

 

BRINGING IT INTO THE CLASSROOM:

 

The subject matter of ‘special events we celebrate’ should be taught alongside lessons that encourage multicultural appreciation, and all lessons should be taught with an attitude that nurtures acceptance of all cultural differences. The lessons suggested for Kindergarten on this website strongly work towards the Early Stage 1 Cultures outcome CUES1.

 

Prejudice No Way provides a number of suitable lesson ideas. The most appropriate for the specific subject matter of special events is the lesson “Calendar Events” where the class uses a calendar showing student birthdays and key world events to read out the key celebrations or events for that day. While all of the lessons can be adapted to teach the specific subject matter, they would be most effective as supporting lessons that encourage positive values in students in the classroom.

 

Many of the lessons encourage cooperative learning, and this should be embraced. Cooperative learning in mixed groups of students improves understanding and acceptance, as well as increasing self-esteem (Petty, 2009). Anti-prejudice activities aid in creating a sense of comfort and belonging in the classroom, which is essential for learning (Zaldana, 2010).

 

TEACHING IDEAS:

 

- Adapt the lesson “Same and different”, in which students are shown a display of each of their selected “special things” (i.e. things that are special to them). Instead, use photos of each student celebrating an event that is important to them and/or their family. As a class, discuss the similarities in how students are celebrating in the photos. Highlight common factors, such as being with family or possibly celebration with food.

 

ASSESSMENT STRATEGY:

 

Have students either write or express about another person in the class: (a) what is the same about their favourite celebration and (b) what is different.

 

LITERACY STRATEGY:

 

- Have students write a simple phrase (with scaffolding as required depending on point of time in the year) along the lines of: “My special celebration is… My favourite part of it is… [Name of other student] likes to celebrate… We both… [Name similarity]”.

 

REFERENCES:

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning.

 

Petty, G. (2009). Evidence-based teaching. Cheltenham: Nelson Thornes.


Zaldana, C. (2010). Multicultural education: what is it and does it have its benefits?. CMC Senior Theses.

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