HSIE - Social Systems and Structures Early Stage 1- Classroom Rules and Routines
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Starting School by Jane Godwin and Anna Walker- Teachers Notes

Emma Parkes's insight:

These Teacher’s notes on the book “Starting School’ by Jane Godwin and Anna Walker and are quite extensive. The notes break down activities into before, during, and after reading. They also break down sections of the story and provide questions that teachers could ask the students based on the story. The story itself is about 5 different children starting school for the first time. The book tells of each child’s different routines and experiences at school.

 

This book is useful in introducing Early Stage 1 learners to the school environment, especially as it is likely to be completely foreign to many of them. Teachers can follow these notes in order to plan a lesson, or even a few lessons due to the amount of content and probable short attention spans of the class.

 

This book also addresses many syllabus outcomes for HSIE. It clearly demonstrates classroom rules and routines and it is essentially a timeline of what happens to each student during that school day, introducing Early Stage 1 learners to the routines of a school day. It also fits into CCES1 and ENES1 as it demonstrates both changes in the lives of the student’s and gives some detail about the features in the school environment.

 

This resource can also be used across the curriculum and fits in the English Syllabus. If this book is read and aloud and the activities in the teacher’s notes are followed, students could work towards the outcome ENe-1A in being able to communicate with their peers in guided communication. Students could also work towards ENe-10C, in thinking creatively about the topic and basic features of the text.

This resource can help improve literacy as “reading aloud to children can also help them improve their literacy skills, not only in reading, but also talking and listening” (Spence, 2004,p.1). Using the questions outlined in this document is also important because by questioning a child “they have the opportunity to share and then explore their own ideas further and to build onto or elaborate their own line of thought” (Edwards-Grove,Anstey & Bull, 2014,p.88).

 

References

Board of Studies NSW.(2007). Syllabus Human Society and Its Environment K-6.Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW.(2012).NSW Syllabuses for the Australian Curriculum English K-10. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Edwards-Groves,C.,Anstey,M. & Bull, G. (2014) Classroom Talk (pp.79-98).Newtown: PETAA

 

Spence,B. (2004). Reading aloud to children Pen 146. Newtown: PETAA

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Cool Rules - YouTube

Produced during Music Outback Foundation workshops in May & August 2012 by Michael Turner, Daniel Pearson & Shayne Johnson at Walgett Primary School with tea...
Emma Parkes's insight:

This is a video showing indigenous children in remote Australia singing a song they developed about their school rules. It incorporates both the English language and local indigenous language.

 

This video was produced by a charity named the “Music Outback foundation”, or MOF. This is an authentic resource as the images provide are positive and relevant to the text. The video was produced with the participation of the indigenous community. The foundation states on their website that “MOF understands at a core level that the wishes of the community in terms of program delivery should form a key element of program design, and that community members should have every opportunity to be part of that delivery” (Music Outback Foundation, 2013). The foundation is also endorsed by both the Northern Territory Government and the Australian Government.

 

This video is a good teaching resource as it is a fun way to introduce Early Stage One learners to the concept of school rules. It is also a simple way to introduce indigenous perspectives to a classroom.

This video could be used as a teaching tool in the classroom as it is a simple way to engage Early Stage One learners. Before showing the video, the teacher could first discuss with students what they already understand about rules and then show the video and to help develop further knowledge.

 

An assessment task in relation to this could be to get the class to develop their own song in class, with each student contributing a rule. This song would serve to ensure that students have understood the concept of classroom rules and routines as their own song would demonstrate students understanding of the topic.

 

Reference:

MOF. (2002). The Music Outback Foundation. Retrieved April 3, 2014 from http://musicoutback.com.au/#

 

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GOING GREEN! (Earth Day song for kids about the 3 R's- Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle! - YouTube

www.HARRYKINDERGARTENMUSIC.COM Going Green! An Earth Day song about how to take care of the Earth! In this song, children will sing about the 3 R's- Reduce, ...
Emma Parkes's insight:

This video is a song developed for ES1 and S1 learners to introduce them to the concept of recycling through the concept of the 3 R’s, Reduce, Reuse and Recycle. It is an appropriate resource for Early Sage One as it is simple and visual, with parts of the song being quite repetitive to encourage young learners to join in.

 

Prior to showing the video, the teacher could ask the students what they already understand about recycling and use the video to further that knowledge.

 

This video could be used to teach classroom rules and routines as after showing the video, the teacher could suggest to the class that recycling become a class rule. A routine in the classroom could then be developed around the process of recycling. This could be done by allocating jobs to each student around the process of recycling.

 

This resource aligns with the syllabus in rights, roles and responsibilities, under social systems and structures as it gives Early Stage 1 learners to opportunity to “organise waste in the classroom and decide how to recycle, what to throw away and what could be useful to others and the environment” (Board of Studies NSW,2007,p.46). Introducing recycling in Early Stage 1 will also help to lead into Stage 1 outcomes, such as “care of resources, including waste disposal” (Board of Studies NSW,2007, p.47) in the Environments strand.

 

Reference:

 

Board of Studies NSW.(2007). Syllabus Human Society and Its Environment K-6.Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

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Quiet at the back: classrooms around the world – in pictures

Quiet at the back: classrooms around the world – in pictures | HSIE - Social Systems and Structures Early Stage 1- Classroom Rules and Routines | Scoop.it
From the Russian pupils in Prada to the Nigerian children who sit four to a desk, photographer Julian Germain takes us on a journey around the world's classrooms
Emma Parkes's insight:

This article features a series of photographs taken by Julian Germain in classrooms all over the world. It features students in a series of 15 photographs, each taken in a different country. The photo series visually highlights the differences in classrooms around the world.

 

Whilst the resource doesn’t not specifically state any classroom rules and routines,  it could be adapted by a teacher to demonstrate different classroom rules and routines. For example, a teacher could show Early Stage 1 learners the photographs and ask them to point out the similarities and differences between the classrooms in the photo and their own classroom. The teacher could ask questions to promote discussion. These questions could include things like “Do you notice that some students aren’t wearing uniforms? Is that a different rule to our classroom?”. This kind of discussion, even among learners as young as Early Stage 1, could help students to understand the differences in classroom rules and routines around the world.

 

The teacher could also do further research into the way that classrooms in these countries are run, and perhaps find some of the rules and routines that would be followed in these classroom. The pictures and this information could then be used to form a story for the students to help the gain a better understanding of the differences in classroom rules and routines.

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School Rules

School Rules | HSIE - Social Systems and Structures Early Stage 1- Classroom Rules and Routines | Scoop.it
Students will sort pictures into "smart choice" or "wrong choice" to help determine what are correct behaviors at school.
Emma Parkes's insight:

This resource allows students to learn interactively by using a SMART board and images of behaviours to determine if each is a ‘smart’ choice or a ‘wrong’ choice. This resource is useful as it allows students to determine the appropriateness of behaviours for themselves.

 

Prior to this lesson, the teacher may feel it appropriate to discuss the meaning of ‘smart choice’ and ‘wrong choice’ with Early Stage 1 learners, and perhaps ask them to provide an example of each from what the already understand about rules.

 

Students could then take part in this lesson to decide which actions are appropriate in the classroom and which are not. The advantage of using a SMART board is twofold. Firstly, as the SMART board is a touch display it allows students to feel empowered in their learning experience as they are able to navigate the system independently.(Giles & Shaw,2011,p.36). Secondly, using a SMART board creates a large working space for the lesson. This large working space increases communication and social interaction between students, leading to greater collaboration in the learning process. (Giles & Shaw,2011,p.36)

 

This resource aligns with the Syllabus for SSES1. Under the Social Systems and Structures strand,  students should be given the opportunity to “gather information about their own needs, the needs of other students, and ways in which these needs are met” (Board of Studies NSW,2007,p.46). This can be achieved through discussion of the actions presented by the lesson and how those actions may impact on fellow class members.

 

By using the activity students are also able to “participate in the development of school rules” (Board of Studies NSW,2007, p.46). This activity is the perfect opportunity to discuss classroom rules with ES1 learners as it is interactive and allows them to make the choice for themselves, introducing them to self-regulation and critical thinking.  Following the activity, students could use the actions in both the ‘good choice’ and ‘wrong choice’ circles to help develop rules for their classroom by maximising positive behaviour and minimising negative behaviour.

 

References:

 

Board of Studies NSW.(2007). Syllabus Human Society and Its Environment K-6.Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Giles, R & Shaw, E.(2011). SMART Boards Rock. Science and Children,49 (4), 36-37.

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