HSIE CCES1 - Changes to People and Places in their Neighbourhood.
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HSIE CCES1 - Changes to People and Places in their Neighbourhood.
Designed for early stage one HSIE, focusing on the CCES1 dot point "changes to people and places in their neighbourhood."
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How times change

How times change | HSIE CCES1 - Changes to People and Places in their Neighbourhood. | Scoop.it
Nancy Sawaya's insight:

Whilst this website does not relate to a particular neighbourhood, it is a good start to the unit in showing students how things have changed over time. Early stage one students may find the use of this website complicated so it is advised that a teacher discusses it with the class – an interactive whiteboard would be beneficial! This website focuses on changes in the family, schools, transport, home life and toys and games. It provides information on how things are now and how they were then, an interactive activity for students in each section and teaching resources for each section. A good idea to use from this website is a timeline. The teacher can provide students with a timeline on butchers paper and they can mark in significant/changing events in their life such as when they first learned to walk and talk, first day of preschool/school etc. The children can then decorate this timeline with pictures or drawings if they wish and they can be put around the classroom. The teacher can then discuss the timelines with the class. If the class is particularly advanced, students may be paired up and asked to do a timeline of one of their peers. Other ideas on this website can also be manipulated to suit this dot point – for example, when looking at toys and games, children can be asked to describe or even bring in from home their favourite childhood toy and explain how they may be interested in different toys now. 

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Education World: A "Typical Day" Then and Now

Nancy Sawaya's insight:

This website provides a lesson plan to investigate changes to people. It does this through the use of a comparison between grandparents and children. A way this can be undertaken in the classroom is during “grandparents” day, which is celebrated on the last Sunday of October each year in Australia (http://grandparentsday.org.au/).  As stated on this site, Grandparents don’t just connect us to the values, stories and histories of our families, but to the values, stories and histories of our communities. Students can be given a list of questions about their grandparents typical day and may be asked to sit with them and discuss the similarities and differences between their life and the life of their grandparents. The teacher may also ask if any grandparent would be willing to speak to the class about the changes that have occurred in their life. If any grandparents have lived in the area for a period of time, they may also like to discuss the way in which places in their neighbourhood have changed. The assessment suggested as part of this lesson plan may be too advanced for early stage one, so teachers may ask children to write/draw one or two differences between their life and the life of their grandparents at the end of this unit. 

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My place, your place | Global Education

My place, your place | Global Education | HSIE CCES1 - Changes to People and Places in their Neighbourhood. | Scoop.it
Nancy Sawaya's insight:

This website contains great practical activities for students to understand changes that occur both locally and globally. Activity 2 is a good way for children to explore their neighbourhood. As a class, the teacher can take children for a short walk around their neighbourhood, observing the different types of housing in the area eg. single or multi-storey, whether they have a garage or a pool etc. The teacher may also choose to find pictures of houses in the area around 50 years ago so children can observe how they have changed. For a global perspective, students can compare the houses they viewed in their area to houses overseas such as in activity 3. As this task may be slightly advanced for early stage one, the teacher can do this comparison as a class by asking students to contribute to the discussion. This will help students generate idea from a range of sources and link them through talk and sharing of ideas (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011). If the class appears to have a good understanding of the topic, the teacher can ask them to identify why they think certain structures in housing have changed in their neighbourhood. To keep young students engaged, they can finish this unit by being asked to draw what their house looks like and who uses what rooms in their house. This links in well as a whole with the CCES1 outcome “demonstrate their own heritage and the heritage of others.” 

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia. 

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Changes

Nancy Sawaya's insight:

This government document is an extremely beneficial resource for early stage one teachers. It breaks up the CCES1 outcome into separate categories such as Aboriginal dreaming, people in our lives, family heritage, changes to places we know and me and my family. Under each of these headings are teaching ideas and assessment strategies to help guide teachers.

 

Among the teaching ideas for change to places, is a focus on where students live. The teacher can ask students where they live and to identify if they have lived there since they were born. Students can form to lines to show if they have lived in the one house or have moved around. The document also suggests to ask if the place where they live now has changed since they have been living there, are these changes good or bad and to identify some more changes that could occur. I would go one step further and make this task an oral presentation so it can be used as to assess this dot point. Students can bring pictures and talk about where live and how it has changed. If they have moved house, they can also talk about how moving changed them.  This also allows for a link into the English syllabus, in particular TES1.2

 

Another good teaching idea, is identify some other family traditions that show change over time e.g. some families have a tradition of planting a tree when a new baby is born, so that the tree grows with the child.  Students can them complete an illustration showing themselves growing and changing over time and how a tree that could have been planted when they were born would also grow and change. This also begins to deal with the ENES1 outcome. 

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My-Place-Classroom-Ideas.pdf

Nancy Sawaya's insight:

This site is an extremely beneficial resource for teachers in being able to link an Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander perspective into this dot point. Set in Sydney, Nadia Wheatley’s book “My Place” presents the story of 21 child characters that, one for each decade since 1788. The essential elements in all the stories are the fig tree, the map and the creek which are symbolic of the land and its sustenance of the people who live there. It links the ‘place’ to the original owners of the land, the Aboriginal people and highlights how many people and cultures share it. Children describe their homes, their families, their pets, and other special celebrations.

 

This website provides classroom activities to coincide with the reading of this book. There are activities for before, during and after the reading. Using this book as a basis for discussion, the teacher can display a large map of the local area on the classroom wall and as a class the students can help mark in positions of public places such as schools, library etc. The teacher may also like to take students to the local library to look at old maps and aerial photographs of the area, making sure to locate natural sources such as creeks or rivers. Using this mapping and the location of certain resources, the class can discuss where Aboriginal people may have camped, the types of natural foods that are available in the area, what activities they may have engaged in etc.

 

The teacher may decide to come back to this book at the end of the unit, to assess and see what the students remember. This can be done through a simple class discussion and brainstorming on the board or she may ask children to role play how different activities may have changed for different people. For example – Aboriginal people used hunting to collect food resources whilst white people now, simply go to a supermarket. "Role play gives participants direct experience with the content of an issue and provides an opportunity to develop skills such as perspective taking" (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 149) This works in well with the CCES1 outcome as it links in Aboriginal heritage and the dreaming as well as this specific dotpoint as it deals with changes to people as well as places. 

 

"My place" is a valid ATSI source as it includes the perspective's of Aboriginal children and recognises Aboriginal people as traditional owners of the land. There is not an overrepresentation of men and seeks a balanced representation of cultural aspects. The importance of the land is also referred to. It is inclusie of both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as well as those of differing backgrounds. 

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia. 

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