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5 Human Impacts on the Environment: Crash Course Ecology #10 - YouTube

Hank gives the run down on the top five ways humans are negatively impacting the environment and having detrimental effects on the valuable ecosystem service...
Vivienne's insight:

This video is a teacher resource that would be used as background information when teaching students about how humans change and adapt their environments and the resulting impacts on the environment. This relates closely to outcome ENS1.6 within the NSW HSIE Syllabus. It is important for teachers to have a deep understanding and knowledge of content and issues that they are presenting to the class. Standard 2 of the National Professional Standards for Teachers highlights the importance of knowing the content in order to effectively teach.

 

This video provides an insight into the way humans affect their environment. I believe it is clear and comprehensive as well as highly informative, allowing teachers to access information that may be useful in order to teach this topic more confidently. This video is part of a series and hence, there are links to other ecology videos including explanations about deforestation and pollution.

 

Although these videos are unsuitable for a Stage 1 class, teachers could show these videos to a Stage 3 class, possibly just short clips or sections of a video that are relevant to the topic area being taught.

 

It should be noted that the teacher should be presenting unbiased views to students, giving students factual information and allowing them to make their own judgements, adopting the critical inquiry approach (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 57). Therefore, teachers should take into account that texts are made for a specific purpose, and while these videos are explanatory, they could still have biased opinions. Although I believe these videos are a valuable informational resource for teachers, it is important to understand that any teacher resource should be viewed critically, and that teachers should present facts to students objectively, without imbuing personal views and beliefs about these issues.

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (Eds.). (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

NSW Institute of Teachers. (2011). National Professional Standards for Teachers. Sydney: Author.

 

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Stage 1 teaching resources

Stage 1 teaching resources | HSIE | Scoop.it
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Click into the Caring for Place - Caring for Country teachers book pdf link

 

When looking at resources with an Indigenous perspective, using selection criteria such as one provided within the Aboriginal Education K-12 Resource Guide ensures that teachers locate and integrate quality, authentic resources that are balanced, unbiased, respectful, accurate and include participation from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community in its creation and implementation. One such resource is the Caring for Place – Caring for Country document.

 

This is a teacher resource that outlines a unit of work aimed at Stage 1 students, which provides an Indigenous perspective about relationships with land and place. In particular, ‘Topic 7: Valuing Place and Country’ and ‘Topic 8: Respecting Place and Country’ align with ENS1.5 and ENS1.6 of the NSW HSIE Syllabus. When focusing on the issue of adaptations to environments to fulfill needs, I believe this document provides some valuable lesson ideas that teachers are able to modify and adapt to suit their class and particular content they are covering.

 

Within Topic 7, there is an emphasis on the way that Aboriginal people view everything in their land. Everything has a specific purpose and examples of the way Aborginal people adapt their environment to fulfill their needs include bush tucker and using a tree to carve weapons. “It is important to point out to students when discussing fishing, hunting or gathering of food, that Aboriginal people only take what they absolutely need from the environment (NSW Department of Education and Training: Aboriginal Education and Training Directorate, 2005, p. 74).” Teachers could also invite Aboriginal community members to talk about how they adapt and use their environment sustainably and respectfully.

 

This connects to Topic 8, where after learning about the way Aboriginal people value and interact with their environment, students discuss the ways in which they can look after the environment and stay connected to their own places, such as at school and at home. This could also become a formative assessment, as teachers can use this activity to assess what prior knowledge students have about the environment and the way that they interact with it.

 

This lesson could be modified to include a class discussion or brainstorm instead of a worksheet to allow further sharing of ideas and positive class interaction. This also facilitates the broadening of student perspectives as well as connections between their own lives and the lives of others (Green, 2006, pp. 238-239). Through the implementation of constructivist theories, students are able to actively construct their own knowledge in order to build understanding, make sense of information and build schema (Piaget, 1926; Woolfolk, 2008, as cited in Marsh, 2010, p. 211).

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

 

Green, D. (2006). So what should my classroom look like? In R. Campbell & D. Green (Eds.), Literacies and learners : current perspectives (3rd ed.). Frenchs Forest, N.S.W.: Pearson Education Australia.

 

Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming a Teacher: Knowledge, Skills and Issues (5th ed.). Frenchs Forest: Pearson Australia.

 

NSW Department of Education and Training: Aboriginal Education and Training Directorate. (2005). Caring for Place – Caring for Country. Sydney: Author.

 

NSW Department of Education and Training, Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate. (2003). Aboriginal Education K-12 Resource Guide. Sydney: Author.

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stage 1 Local places (A)

stage 1 Local places (A) | HSIE | Scoop.it
Vivienne's insight:

Local Places is a Stage 1 Connected Outcomes Group (COGs) Unit, wherein one of the Key Learning Areas (KLAs) is HSIE. This teacher resource outlines various learning experiences, although Features of the Environment (p.14) would be the most appropriate for exploring adaptations to environments to fulfill needs within the ENS1.5 and ENS1.6 outcomes in the NSW HSIE Syllabus.

 

Some benefits of this document are that it allows students to view different natural and built environments, including heritage environments. This exposes students to a wider variety of environments than they may have come across previously. Furthermore, if possible, organising walks or excursions to explore different areas and environments, such as parks, buildings or other ecosystems including rivers and other bodies of water, would be invaluable for students to gain a deeper understanding and perception of environments as well as giving them real life experiences, in which they are able to engage with their learning.

 

Once students develop knowledge regarding various environments, students “discuss how and why the natural environment has been changed [and] list possible reasons for these changes” (NSW Department of Education and Training: Curriculum K-12 Directorate, 2009, p.14). To display this information, students could construct a table individually or in pairs, which has been explicitly taught and scaffolded, ensuring that students can write basic sentences within each category. Alternatively, the teacher may choose to make this a whole class collaborative activity involving a discussion of each site. In other words, the teacher has a choice between literacy strategies, including modelled writing or independent writing activities. Teachers are also incorporating the literacy strategy of using graphic organisers.

 

Another approach would be to assign each student or group of students one local area and they would construct a profile of information regarding how the environment has changed over time and why. This could be given as a research project as a form of assessment to allow students more time to gather and present information as well as learning about effective research practices. I believe this activity has the potential to focus on reasons why humans adapt their environment, which could lead to a discussion about the needs that are trying to be fulfilled.

 

It should be noted that these lessons are a part of an integrated unit, encompassing various KLAs including Science and Technology, Creative Arts and PDHPE. Therefore, lessons may have outcomes from more than one syllabus and there may be an overarching goal to be achieved. “More than ever, educators are adopting models of curriculum organisation and planning that enable them to make as many meaningful linkages across disciplines as possible (Ewing & Simons, 2004, p. 39). It is important that teachers make cross-curricular links within their teaching in order to allow students to make connections in their own learning and be provided with a holistic view of various subjects and issues. Within this particular learning experience, links can be made to the new Science and Technology K-10 Syllabus regarding built environments.

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

 

Board of Studies, NSW. (2012). Science K-10 (Incorporating Science and Technology K-6) Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

 

Ewing, R., & Simons, J. (2004). Beyond the Script Take 2: Drama in the Classroom. Newtown NSW: Primary English Teaching Association.

 

NSW Department of Education and Training: Curriculum K-12 Directorate. (2009). Local Places. Sydney: Author.

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The Lorax (ebook) - YouTube

Vivienne's insight:

This Youtube video is an e-book of The Lorax by Dr Seuss and would be used as a student resource. This text is an engaging stimulus that allows students to be entertained by the story as well as perceiving concepts surrounding the ways in which humans adapt their environment to fulfill needs. Cross-curricular links can be made to the reading and viewing strand of the new English K-10 Syllabus. “Literature does not belong only in the English class” (Winch et al., 2010, p. 473). This is an example of quality literature that allows the teacher to transition students into a discussion about these issues in HSIE.

 

In terms of incorporating this e-book within an HSIE lesson, I believe it is highly appropriate to embed it within the introduction of a lesson focused on adaptations to environments to fulfill needs within the ENS1.5 and ENS1.6 outcomes of the NSW HSIE Syllabus. Moreover, this clip could be played more than once to the class, possibly spanning over a sequence of lessons. During the first viewing, the clip should be played all the way through, allowing students to engage with the text uninterrupted. After watching the video, the teacher could lead a class discussion in which students identify what happens in the book. The teacher may prompt students with questions targeted at the way in which the once-ler adapted their environment to fulfill needs. This includes what those needs were and how these changes affected the surrounding environment.

 

The teacher would then allow students to consider their own needs and how they may be impacting on their environment, possibly drawing from similarities seen in the book. Possible follow-up activities include making a pro and con list about changes to the environment or brainstorming about the ways that humans adapt and change their environment to fulfill needs. These activities could be independent or small group tasks. Cooperative learning tasks in small groups can be used to facilitate social development, promote interaction and interpersonal skills amongst a variety of other benefits including individual accountability and positive interdependence (Johnson & Johnson, 1989, p. 11). These are highly valuable skills for students to learn and are able to gain through effective group work.

 

Teachers should use their discretion and modify their lessons in order to suit the class. For example, students may have a solid foundation of background knowledge about the way humans affect the environment. On the other hand, students may need to investigate further to understand the way humans interact and impact on their environment. This could include extra information that is provided by the teacher. The teacher should define the concepts of adaptations, environments and needs with children.

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

 

 

Johnson, D., & Johnson, R. (1989). Cooperation and competition: Theory and research. Medina, MN: Interaction Book Co.

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy : reading, writing and children’s literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

 

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People and the environment | Global Education

People and the environment | Global Education | HSIE | Scoop.it
Vivienne's insight:

Global education is a website that provides a variety of teacher resources, including lesson ideas and teaching activities, that have a global perspective. Within the subject area of ‘People and the environment’ aimed at Early Stage 1 and Stage 1, ‘Activity 2: People’s impact on places’ is highly relevant to the content strand regarding adaptations to environments to fulfill needs, under ENS1.5 and ENS1.6 outcomes in the NSW HSIE Syllabus.

 

Using Window and Home by Jeannie Baker as a lesson stimulus, students examine the changes that people have made to the environment. After incorporating the literacy strategy of a shared or modelled reading (reading aloud) with a focus on meaning, the teacher could compile a list through student discussion after reading these books. Students could also reflect on whether they have seen similar changes within their local area or community. When choosing quality children’s literature for the classroom, teachers should ensure that they span across cultural contexts, “are dynamic and evolving and have personal, social, cultural, and aesthetic value and potential for enriching lives and scopes of experience” (Winch et al., 2010, p. 466). Within an HSIE context, it is also important that chosen texts have cross-curricular links that are relevant to the topic being taught. For example, there are links to the reading and viewing strand as well as the writing and representing strand within the new English K-10 Syllabus.

 

Modifications to the individually constructed PMI chart activity would be to split students into small groups of three or four and allocating half the groups to discuss the positives of human adaptations to the environment to fulfill needs and asking the other half of the groups to discuss the negatives. As the groups are working, the teacher would be able to monitor the class and help any students who may need further assistance. The class would then share their ideas, possibly alternating between groups to hear one positive and then one negative point.

 

Moreover, a whole class activity or an extension activity would be to allow students to construct sentences independently about the positive or negative arguments that they have discussed within the group. The teacher may scaffold students, including providing sentence starters and writing down any ‘tricky’ spelling words or new vocabulary on the board. This activity could also be used as an assessment, wherein students are able to demonstrate whether they are able to identify positive or negative human adaptations to environments to fulfill needs.

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

 

Board of Studies, NSW. (2012). English K-10 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

 

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy : reading, writing and children’s literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

 

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