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Creative Classrooms Lab - FCL | Integration of tablets into teaching and learning

Creative Classrooms Lab - FCL | Integration of tablets into teaching and learning | HS Eng | Scoop.it
The Creative Classrooms Lab project (CCL) brought together teachers and policy-makers in eight countries to design, implement and evaluate 1:1 tablet scenarios in 45 schools. The project produced learning scenarios and activities, guidelines and recommendations to help policy-makers and schools to take informed decisions on optimal strategies for implementing 1:1 initiatives in schools and for the effective integration of tablets into teaching and learning. The project, funded by the European Commission’s Lifelong Learning Programme, was coordinated by European Schoolnet, involved 10 partners and ran from April 2013 to May 2015.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 3, 2015 9:17 AM

The Creative Classrooms Lab project (CCL) brought together teachers and policy-makers in eight countries to design, implement and evaluate 1:1 tablet scenarios in 45 schools. The project produced learning scenarios and activities, guidelines and recommendations to help policy-makers and schools to take informed decisions on optimal strategies for implementing 1:1 initiatives in schools and for the effective integration of tablets into teaching and learning. The project, funded by the European Commission’s Lifelong Learning Programme, was coordinated by European Schoolnet, involved 10 partners and ran from April 2013 to May 2015.


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21 Grab-And-Go Teaching Tools For Your Classroom

21 Grab-And-Go Teaching Tools For Your Classroom | HS Eng | Scoop.it
21 Grab-And-Go Teaching Tools For Your Classroom by Lynn Usrey Every teacher wants to be able to make his or her classroom environment the optimum…

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Angela Mitchell's curator insight, August 18, 2015 11:35 AM

Kahoot and Seesaw journal I can recommend as great tools for the classroom.

RebeccaMoore's curator insight, August 18, 2015 6:33 PM

Because there are so many tech resources available for educators, it can be a daunting task to research and find what might be best for your class. "21 Grab-And-Go Teaching Tools" shows the top websites, apps, and programs that teacher choose.

Lee Hall's curator insight, August 21, 2015 9:52 AM

These are some of my favorites. I haven't found a teacher yet that doesn't love Kahoot!

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Back to School Selfie Adventure for Your Students!

Back to School Selfie Adventure for Your Students! | HS Eng | Scoop.it

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Why Kahoot is one of my favourite classroom tools

Why Kahoot is one of my favourite classroom tools | HS Eng | Scoop.it
Kahoot is one of my favourite tools to use in the classroom. Students love it, and they are always engaged when I use it.

For those of you that

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Carol Ann Frey Reinagel's curator insight, June 20, 2015 10:18 AM

Truly a great tool. Easy, Effective, Engaging!

Sandrine Pac-Kenny's curator insight, June 20, 2015 5:48 PM

I love it too and so do students! 

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What are the Best Ways a Teacher can Demonstrate Leadership in the Classroom?

What are the Best Ways a Teacher can Demonstrate Leadership in the Classroom? | HS Eng | Scoop.it
As part of C.M Rubin’s monthly series in the Huffington post: The Global Search for Education: Our Top 12 Global Teacher Blogs, this is my third contribution. This month we are answering the follow...

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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 20, 2015 10:38 AM

How does leadership look like in the classroom? What are the best ways a teacher can demonstrate leadership in the classroom?

Read more at: http://langwitches.org/blog/2015/06/16/what-are-the-best-ways-a-teacher-can-demonstrate-leadership-in-the-classroom/


cioccas's curator insight, June 20, 2015 7:33 PM

Another fabulous blog post and illustration from @langwitches

Patricia Thomson's curator insight, June 24, 2015 3:54 AM

Discusses four essential components to good teaching.

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How Minecraft and Duct Tape Wallets Prepare Our Kids for Jobs That Don’t Exist Yet (EdSurge News)

How Minecraft and Duct Tape Wallets Prepare Our Kids for Jobs That Don’t Exist Yet (EdSurge News) | HS Eng | Scoop.it
Whether it’s Minecraft or duct tape wallets, the childhood passions that seem like fads, if not totally unproductive, can alternatively be seen as mediums for experiencing the virtuous cycle of curiosity: discovering, trying, failing and growing. At DIY, we’ve created a way for kids to explore hundreds of skills and to understand the ways in which they can be creative through them. Often, the skills are unconventional, and almost always the results are surprising. I don’t think it’s important that kids use the skills they learn on DIY for the rest of their lives. What’s important is that kids develop the muscle to be fearless learners so that they are never stuck with the skills they have. Only this will prepare them for a world where change is accelerating and depending on a single skill to provide a lifetime career is becoming impossible.

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LET Team's curator insight, June 3, 2015 7:37 PM

Who's for Duct Tape Ninja?

Rachel Benoit's curator insight, June 4, 2015 8:56 AM

'Fearless learners', now that is a great concept, and who doesn't love duct tape. 

Dr. Laura Sheneman's curator insight, July 24, 2015 9:31 AM

Makerspace reasoning.

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Creating Infographics with an iPad

Creating Infographics with an iPad | HS Eng | Scoop.it

...Now, however, there is an iPad app that can simply and flexibly create professional-looking infographics of almost any kind.

Visualize is a free (woo-hoo!) app from Reallusion, Inc., that offers a versatile canvas for designing information. Students can choose from a large array of fonts, shapes, call-outs, stickers, post-its, and backgrounds to lay out their graphics.


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Nine steps for creating an amazing infographic

Nine steps for creating an amazing infographic | HS Eng | Scoop.it
How to create an amazing infographic with Visme in just 9 steps.

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Baiba Svenca's curator insight, December 14, 2014 2:17 AM

9 steps how to create infographics, well-presented and concise.

Thanks for the suggestion to Payman Taei.

Payman Taei's comment, December 14, 2014 9:45 AM
Welcome Babi. Always a pleasure to share.
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[Infographic] Using Solution Fluency in Design Thinking

[Infographic] Using Solution Fluency in Design Thinking | HS Eng | Scoop.it
This infographic from Nueva School serves as inspiration for our own “design process” infographic. It’s called “Solution Thinking”, and it’s about using Solution Fluency in design projects.

Solution Fluency is bound by the tenets of Global Digital Citizenship and encompasses the other 21st Century Fluencies. We’ve put together an infographic to keep track of it all. Hope it proves helpful!

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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 25, 2015 5:56 PM

This infographic from Nueva School serves as inspiration for our own “design process” infographic. It’s called “Solution Thinking”, and it’s about using Solution Fluency in design projects. 

Solution Fluency is bound by the tenets of Global Digital Citizenship and encompasses the other 21st Century Fluencies. We’ve put together an infographic to keep track of it all. Hope it proves helpful!


Eunice Sari's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:03 PM

21st century kids - must be able not only to accept the information, but use the info creatively to solve problems, discover new things, dream and design for better solutions.

Julie Lindsay's curator insight, May 26, 2015 5:10 PM

The Global Digital Citizen website also has a solution fluency quickstart guide for free download.

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Top 20 ipad apps to flip your classroom

My Learning Diary is made with my favorite #flipclass tool GlogsterEDU http://dumacornellucian.edu.glogster.com/duma-cornel-lucian-creative-use-of-tablets-mooc-by-eun/ | GoClass for iPad, Educreations Interactive Whiteboard for iPad, Aurasma for iPad, Showbie - Paperless Classroom, Knowmia Teach for iPad, Edmodo for iPad, Schoology for iPad, ShowMe Interactive Whiteboard for iPad, Explain Everything for iPad, and TED for iPad

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Krystyna Gadd Founder How to Accelerate Learning's curator insight, May 8, 2015 5:40 AM

I am going to check some of these out for learning in business!

Sm_english's curator insight, May 8, 2015 3:50 PM

Tried most of them...excellent and easy 

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8 assumptions you need to make about using classroom technology

8 assumptions you need to make about using classroom technology | HS Eng | Scoop.it
Assumptions, in handwritten notes, explained below (just in case... ;-) !) In July, I teach two face-to-face technology courses for local secondary school teachers working for the Education Departm...

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5 Excellent New Twitter Tools for Teachers

5 Excellent New Twitter Tools for Teachers | HS Eng | Scoop.it

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44 Diverse Tools To Publish Student Work | Infographic

44 Diverse Tools To Publish Student Work | Infographic | HS Eng | Scoop.it
44 Diverse Tools To Publish Student Work

 

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/03/04/learning-to-learn-preparation-for-better-learning-how-to/

 


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cherimacleod's curator insight, June 14, 2015 1:09 AM

Tools tools tools

Julie Lindsay's curator insight, June 14, 2015 5:37 PM

Tony Vincent - Learning in Hand - always provides excellent resources for classrooms.

James I.'s curator insight, June 16, 2015 9:43 PM

Love the fact that this infographic focuses both on the web and mobile possibilities.

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Five Critical Skills to Empower Students in the Digital Age

Five Critical Skills to Empower Students in the Digital Age | HS Eng | Scoop.it
Using the first five days of school to teach learning skills that will be used throughout the course is a great way to start the new school year.

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WE's curator insight, August 24, 2015 2:49 AM

Critical thinking skills in Digital Age.. 

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, August 24, 2015 5:44 PM

#Empowerment #Students #Education #Counseling

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How to Arrange Elements on Presentation Slides Like a Graphic Designer

How to Arrange Elements on Presentation Slides Like a Graphic Designer | HS Eng | Scoop.it
A few fast and easy pointers on how you can dramatically improve your presentation slides by learning how to arrange texts, images and video like a graphic

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Google Tips and Tricks - "I didn't know I could do that in Google!"

Google tips and tricks presentation to educators on Nov. 6, 2014 at BIT14 (ECOO) in Niagara Falls Ontario Canada.

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Jennifer McGuff's curator insight, August 1, 2015 4:49 PM

Google tips, tricks and tutorials that I definitely did not know about it.

Christine Rounsevell's curator insight, August 26, 2015 8:28 PM

Ok. I admit I didn't know Google could do half those things!

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, November 19, 2015 5:31 PM

#Google #Education #Apps

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A framework for content curation

A framework for content curation | HS Eng | Scoop.it
In conversation at EduTECH earlier this month, Harold Jarche evoked George E. P. Box's quote that "all models are wrong, but some are useful". Of course, the purpose of a model is to simplify a com...

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Dr. Pyrate's curator insight, June 19, 2015 9:00 AM

How do I know I'm curating this? (go meta!) Well, inserting comments helps. I can't read the top level in this image, so this could be improved.

Karen Dunlap's curator insight, June 19, 2015 7:43 PM

Could be nicely applied to online PLC formation. 

Zhang Meilan's curator insight, June 25, 2015 11:20 PM

该内容策展的框架,虽招致很多争议,但其将策展能激发学生参与到让学生的策展产生价值,分成了三个类别,8个层次,这对指导策展教学很有意义。

第一类是引起学生注意:1.吸引我; 2.激励我。

第二类是告诉学生:3.告诉我; 4.给我看。

第三类是让学生自己行动:5.让我来;6.支持我;7.让我做的更好;8.让我产生价值。

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How to Teach Concepts (and Make Them Crystal Clear) in eLearning

How to Teach Concepts (and Make Them Crystal Clear) in eLearning | HS Eng | Scoop.it
As an instructional designer, you will have to teach concepts. Here’s a three-step process to help you teach concepts in eLearning.

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How to bring visual learning into the classroom using infographics

How to bring visual learning into the classroom using infographics | HS Eng | Scoop.it

This year for the first time, I asked my students to create an Infographic as their culminating project for our study of the Civil Rights movement. I wanted them to give a presentation, but also wanted to move away from the traditional PowerPoints or poster sessions that they have done in the past. I liked the idea of them learning to present content effectively in a creative medium, and infographics are perfect for that. For this, I elected to use my favorite tool for creating professional looking infographics, Venngage

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How to Make an Animated #infographic

How to Make an Animated #infographic | HS Eng | Scoop.it
Eleanor Lutz has done some amazing design work with her company Tabletop Whale. She is known especially for her work creating animated infographics using animated GIF files. Check out the infographic below to know how to make an animated infographic.

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9 Tools for Making Infographics in the Classroom

9 Tools for Making Infographics in the Classroom | HS Eng | Scoop.it

From Global Digital Citizen: "Creating great infographics need not be a chore, no matter if you’re a teacher or a student. Taking information and presenting it in an artful and visually appealing way has never been easier, thanks to Web 2.0 tools.

Before you dive in, here are some quick tips:

Collect your data. If you have been collecting data, compile it all in a spreadsheet.Decide the best way to present your data (flyer-style, bar charts, line charts, Venn diagrams, histogram, scatter plot charts, flow charts, timelines, etc.).Design a rough sketch so you don’t end up flying blind.Pick your app and get to work!"


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Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, May 22, 2015 12:23 PM

Share with teachers to give a quick overview of the many tools out there to create infographics. Our students have been using Piktochart a lot this year, but it's always good to have a few options available.

Peta White's curator insight, March 19, 2016 3:41 AM

Share with teachers to give a quick overview of the many tools out there to create infographics. Our students have been using Piktochart a lot this year, but it's always good to have a few options available.

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Six free edtech resources to transform your teaching - Innovate My School

Six free edtech resources to transform your teaching - Innovate My School | HS Eng | Scoop.it
Sometimes it’s just great to recommend cool stuff for your peers. Here, Social Media and Educational Technology specialist Scott Hayden and teacher / e-learning coordinator Rachel Jones discuss their favourite free resources for the classroom.

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Noodle - Make Better Education Decisions - Connecting students with resources

Noodle - Make Better Education Decisions - Connecting students with resources | HS Eng | Scoop.it
Use Noodle's advanced search and community of experts to find the schools, tutoring, and educational opportunities that are right for you.

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ICTmagic – Digital & Web Tools | UKEdChat - Supporting the Education Community

ICTmagic – Digital & Web Tools | UKEdChat - Supporting the Education Community | HS Eng | Scoop.it

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Literature is the new Latin

Literature is the new Latin | HS Eng | Scoop.it
When a teacher hands out a novel today, students ask, ‘Is there a movie of this?

 

 

 

 

 

______________________

A PREFACE written AFTER having written what follows:

1. Please read the article linked to above before reading my comments.

2. You may have to scroll back to my concession list in order to make sense out my counter-comments made below

3. I'm pre-apologizing for the RANT and the length of my comments, but the value of literature in the classroom is under serious attack and those who have accepted the responsibility of teaching literature may need to rise more strongly in its defense.

_______________________

 

OMG! I rarely find myself truly annoyed, distressed, and upset in the way this article ticked me off! Not only is the author's position upsetting, but the fact that the author is an English teacher really upset me beyond levels I can even recall.

 

[PAUSE-TAKE A DEEP BREATH]

 

Okay. So let me listen to my own counsel. First, l purposely look for issues I can concede. This usually calms me down enough to take a more objective look.

 

I can concede:

1. Replacing unengaging activities with engaging activities is a key to success.

2. Many students may well be MORE attracted to short cuts such as "movie versions" of a book, and Spark Notes, though I'm not entirely certain that at least to a some degree this hasn't always been true.

3. Some students do seem to have insufficient attention spans required for deep learning and deep critical thinking.

4. Today's gadget heavy environment may well provide more opportunities for distraction to the students who've not been brought up to understand that there are times to work and times to play.

5. There may be great truth in the author's claim that "We are entering a period similar to the Dark Ages when the study of “The Great Works” was carried on by small groups of monks in monasteries, now transformed into graduate students huddled in study carrels."

6. Many students assume that the only learning of value is the learning that they perceive as being useful for the job they think they want to have.

7. There may well be excessive attention to having all students learn how to write long essays.

8. There may well be too little room in the typical curriculm for students to explore their perceived passions.

9. It is VERY true that "one size does not fit all."

10. Some requirements may well be arbitrary.

 

Okay there. Now the question arises, "If I found so many areas for my "concession paragraph" how can I still find the article absolutely embarrassingly superficial, even poisonous?"

 

First, in looking back at the list of concessions, I realize that I am willing to concede at least to some degree that the argument's PREMISES may have some validity.

 

However, I do not necessarily agree that the premises are sufficiently focused, sufficiently contemplated, or adequately supported by evidence or commentary that precludes the possibility of very different conclusions. In fact, the defense of the premises seem incredibly "light" and superficially cherry-picked. Nor can I agree that many of the premises represent the essential questions that ought to be addressed. 

 

So a (not-so) quick counter comment on the conceded premises, 

#1: Making an activity engaging is much more a result of the teacher's skills. One piece of literature taught dreadfully is not the same activity as that same piece of literature taught by a masterful teacher. This is true in every curricular area. 

#2: Again this is true across curricular areas. We used to assume that shortcuts were the tactics of only the lazy, but in truth, seeking shortcuts is also quite common among the overloaded "high achieving" students. As to following their passions for say modern technology? Using "cheats" as they are called is almost standard practice particularly among those future " video game designers" the author references. Perhaps we ought to recognize that there may be a larger problem in the limited concern for ethical values than is good for society. Some develop admirable ethical values from faith-based teachings, some from solid parenting, some from scout leaders, and some from great literature. I don't really think any of these or other sources "owns" the ethical education world. But, I do believe that great literature always has been and continues to be a very solid source for ethical education. 

One need not spend much time exploring the most popular video games to recognize a fairly strong attention to the violent and destructive and adrenlin-fueled "solution seeking  created by the "who-cares-if-the-values-are-despicable-IT-SELLS!" attitudes behind much  if not most of the development and marketing of video games.

#3: Attention span is directly related to engagement. There's a sort of chicken and egg situation with new knowledge. If I don't know why I should care about something, I may have a very short attention span for being lectured about it or reading about it. If I already like something I can lock into it for incredibly long periods of time. This is the grand dilemma of education. We generally are not in the business of pandering to a student's intellectual status quo. Our job is to "sell" the value of many knowledge fronts beyond a student's current interests both in depth AND in breadth. This is where the master teacher shines. Ask yourself how it was that the teachers you recall most fondly got you to go enthusiastically where you had not gone before. 

#4: There have ALWAYS been adequate distractions tempting us to not attend to what needs attention. Quantity of such distractions is a false argument. The real question is whether or not sufficient attention has been given to raising children capable of self-discipline who know the importance of "taking care of business" when there is business to take care of. There are many elements in a young person's life that determine a child's sense of his or her own responsibilities. We can not select one as the failure point for the student with an "under-developed" sense of personal responsibilities. And we certainly must be cautious about assuming that whether or not a young person finds something boring, that it is the "thing" not the young person that needs to be changed. 

 

I have a favorite saying about boredom. "Some people are bored whenever they are challenged and others are bored only when they are not challenged."

#5: Can't really argue with this premise. I'm not sure why the author admits that he is using this argument in favor of  his position. But, perhaps we might learn a lesson from the dark ages. Though the term dark ages is now considered misleading it was a time of limited "intellectual spread" much as a result of extremely limited access to knowledge. It was a time when access to knowledge was restricted almost exclusively to the chosen and the powerful, ignorant superstition ran rampant, some believed that the plague could be treated by whipping themselves or by burning witches, the Crusades? Now there's a lesson we apparently haven't learned! Literature is NOT the cause of our moving into a new "Dark Ages." But a lack of appreciation for literature's lessons might be.

#6: First, what do students really know about their job interests? Many are passionate and follow those early conceived dreams to happy lives for certain. But have you ever wondered why it is that so many people change their majors in college? Or whether a whole bunch of those super-star MBAs who made it to Wall Street might have benefitted from a bit more focus on elements at the center of a liberal education? And then again there's that future video game designer the author uses as his best example of our letting kids choose what they think is all they need to know about video game design. And who knows what that guy who recently created the anti-Muslim video that sparked intense rioting and killing of not only an American Ambassador and other Americans, but also fed the flames of anti-American hatred already endangering thousands of people around the world, was thinking? A few more history and culture classes might have rounded out his education.

#7: I have the hardest time refuting this argument. I could emphasize the importance of being able to write an essay on college applications and in many college courses, though for years high school English teachers have been told explicitly how much college professors find the five-paragraph robot essay to be the source of horrible writing. But, writing articulately is important as a job skill in many areas and indirectly as practice in intelligently articulating our thoughts, knowledge, opinions and contributions whether in writing or in speaking or in evaluating what others have written in say... voter phamphlets, political speeches, advertisements, junk mail, and anywhere where words are used in text or otherwise. BUT, the essay is not the only forum where intelligent articulation happens in writing. And many students will not go on to college where the essay peaks as a valued skill. 

#8: I agree that more room ought to be made for exploring one's passions. That's why I am so concerned that curriculum in the areas of the arts, what used to be called shop classes more recently vocational arts, even geography, health, and physical education are the first to get cut when budgets are tight. One need only face the facts about obesity or hate crimes or hate radio to wonder whether or not there might be more to a well-rounded education that just what a kid perceives as necessary for a job dream that may or may not be realistic.

#9: True. One size does not fit all. But, some degree of common knowledge combined with some degree of customization is a better approach. That is not an easy goal to accomplish. Tracking was an effort in that direction that did have its upsides, but also significant downsides. This is not to say that tracking was a failure, but that more sophisticated methods of providing individualized attention need to continue to evolve which fortunately can be seen happening among forward thinking educators today.

#10: Yeah what can I say? The problem is and always has been, "What does a really effective educational environment look like, not in idealistic jingoistic terms, but in practice? It's an easy question to ask. It's an easy criticism to make about much of the existing educational environment. It's an incredibly difficult problem to solve. 

 

 

And, to suggest simplistic premises, and simplistic  solutions as if those simplistic solutions were capable of addressing such complex and serious challenges, is no better than the simplistic solutions of burning witches, torturing non-believers, witholding education from women, slaves, and the layity in general, and brushing one's teeth with urine all considered at one time to be "simple solutions" to serious and complex issues of the day.

 

In fact, selling such superficial ideas is dangerous. It wasn't such a good idea when it led to the crusades; a simplistic solution that lead to centuries of subsequent trouble; troubles we are still suffering from in every corner of the world.

 

And to see such simplistic argument put forward by an English teacher is ... well, devastatingly depressing.   

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 


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Rosmaire's curator insight, November 3, 2014 5:57 AM

Is it that bad in the US?