HSIE Stage 3: Change & Continuity
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Australia's 1967 Referendum

Australia's 1967 Referendum | HSIE Stage 3: Change & Continuity | Scoop.it
Why have the results of the 1967 Referendum had a lasting symbolic significance? Civil rights activist Faith Bandler...
Molly Rose 's insight:

Australia’s 1967 Referendum

‘Australia’s 1967 referendum’ is a great resource to use in a Stage 3 primary classroom and should be used after first looking at democracy in Australia. This resource provides students with insight into the exclusion of Aboriginal peoples in democratic Australia. This resource provides students with an example “of events and issues that have influenced democratic practices in Australia…” while also examining “examples of exclusion from citizenship, both past and present, and the effect of this exclusion, including the effects of government policies on Aboriginal peoples” (NSW Board of Studies, 2006, p. 25). ‘Australia’s 1967 referendum’ provides students with detailed descriptions of both national and local events and any issues, problems and trends encountered.

Before viewing the Splash ABC resource, discuss with students if they know what a referendum is.
During the video, use some of the ‘things to think about’ on the webpage to engage the students and keep them on track;
- Discuss if they think the white Anglo Saxons in Australia encountered the same issues.
- Ask how long the rallying went on for
- How many signatures they had to have and how many they got
- Why did they have to be persistent and present a petition everyday?

After viewing discuss how issues touched on in the clip influenced democratic practices.
- Discuss why the referendum was a democratic practice.
- Discuss if the referendum was successful and ideas why it was so successful.
- Discuss, why the referendum was vital.
- Discuss what they think the general population thought about Aboriginal people at this time. Write key words on the board for students.

Replay the video again for students so that they can link the discussions back to the clip.

Students will write an informative text in the form of a newspaper article set either before or after the 1967 referendum, or an informative poster about the referendum. Students will have a choice between the literacy activities they undertake. Students in stage 3 will use their prior knowledge and experiment “with text structures, language features, images and digital resources appropriate to purpose and audience (ACELY1714)” (Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority, 2014). Students must include the notion of democracy, Australia as a democracy and/or democratic practices.

Teachers can use this resource in the stage 3 classrooms to address the impact that democratic practices in Australia had on the inclusion of Aboriginal people into society. This resource provides students with insight into the issues and problems faced by Aboriginal people, while also recognising and examining “events and issues that have influenced democratic practices in Australia” (NSW Board of Studies, 2006, p. 25). Furthermore, this resource allows students in stage 3 to take a critical approach to understanding democracy, as they are able to see the change in treatment and policies towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, due to democratic events such as the referendum.

This resource is fantastic to integrate into the classroom as it gives students the “power to judge things for themselves, and not be led unthinkingly by the views of others” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 12). The Splash ABC resource allows the students of stage 3 to understand local and national issues that surrounded Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and how democratic practices were put in place to overcome barriers of exclusion.

References:

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2014). English Curriculum. Retrieved 12 March, 2014 from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/english/Curriculum/F-10#level1


Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Retrieved 12 March, 2014 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/wcm/connect/93e2f966-0629-492b-9ae6-4a3b052edf98/k6_hsie_syl.pdf?MOD=AJPERES


Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Molly Rose's curator insight, October 13, 2014 1:53 AM

Australia’s 1967 referendum’ is a great resource to use in a Stage 3 primary classroom and should be used after first looking at democracy in Australia. This resource provides students with insight into the exclusion of Aboriginal peoples in democratic Australia. This resource provides students with an example “of events and issues that have influenced democratic practices in Australia…” while also examining “examples of exclusion from citizenship, both past and present, and the effect of this exclusion, including the effects of government policies on Aboriginal peoples” (NSW Board of Studies, 2006, p. 25). ‘Australia’s 1967 referendum’ provides students with detailed descriptions of both national and local events and any issues, problems and trends encountered.

Before viewing the Splash ABC resource, discuss with students if they know what a referendum is.
During the video, use some of the ‘things to think about’ on the webpage to engage the students and keep them on track;
- Discuss if they think the white Anglo Saxons in Australia encountered the same issues.
- Ask how long the rallying went on for
- How many signatures they had to have and how many they got
- Why did they have to be persistent and present a petition everyday?

After viewing discuss how issues touched on in the clip influenced democratic practices.
- Discuss why the referendum was a democratic practice.
- Discuss if the referendum was successful and ideas why it was so successful.
- Discuss, why the referendum was vital.
- Discuss what they think the general population thought about Aboriginal people at this time. Write key words on the board for students.

Replay the video again for students so that they can link the discussions back to the clip.

Students will write an informative text in the form of a newspaper article set either before or after the 1967 referendum, or an informative poster about the referendum. Students will have a choice between the literacy activities they undertake. Students in stage 3 will use their prior knowledge and experiment “with text structures, language features, images and digital resources appropriate to purpose and audience (ACELY1714)” (Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority, 2014). Students must include the notion of democracy, Australia as a democracy and/or democratic practices.

Teachers can use this resource in the stage 3 classrooms to address the impact that democratic practices in Australia had on the inclusion of Aboriginal people into society. This resource provides students with insight into the issues and problems faced by Aboriginal people, while also recognising and examining “events and issues that have influenced democratic practices in Australia” (NSW Board of Studies, 2006, p. 25). Furthermore, this resource allows students in stage 3 to take a critical approach to understanding democracy, as they are able to see the change in treatment and policies towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, due to democratic events such as the referendum.

This resource is fantastic to integrate into the classroom as it gives students the “power to judge things for themselves, and not be led unthinkingly by the views of others” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 12). The Splash ABC resource allows the students of stage 3 to understand local and national issues that surrounded Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and how democratic practices were put in place to overcome barriers of exclusion.

References:

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2014). English Curriculum. Retrieved 12 March, 2014 from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/english/Curriculum/F-10#level1


Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Retrieved 12 March, 2014 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/wcm/connect/93e2f966-0629-492b-9ae6-4a3b052edf98/k6_hsie_syl.pdf?MOD=AJPERES


Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Asylum Plan

Asylum Plan | HSIE Stage 3: Change & Continuity | Scoop.it
The way we treat asylum seekers that arrive here by boat has been hotly debated by all sides of politics for a long time. But now after the release of a new report, both the Government and the Opposition are finally agreeing on which path to take. So what is this solution that's managed to make the PM and Tony Abbott see eye to eye?
Molly Rose 's insight:

Asylum plan

 

This Behind the News report on the ‘Asylum Plan’ is a fantastic resource to use in the stage 3 classroom for ‘change and continuity.’ The report addresses policies that are put in place to stop refugees arriving to Australia by boat, while also emphasising reasons why this policy may be regarded as inhumane or unfair. This video allows the students in the classroom to develop their own opinion on this national and global event. Furthermore, this report highlights for the students the issues and problems with events such as this, and even touches on some of the trends that have developed with people arriving by boat.

 

Following the report, discuss with the class some of the issues and problems facing the asylum seekers that are coming by boat. Discuss with students how they would feel if they had hope to seek refuge in another country, however was sent elsewhere to be ‘processed.’ Discuss whether they agree with the government’s policy on the asylum seekers.  

 

A class activity following this video could include a class debate. The class could be divided into two groups, one group will argue for the offshore processing, while the other group will argue against offshore processing. Students will consider if democratic practices should be undertaken i.e. a referendum. Students will argue why offshore processing is a good or bad idea, and the impact it will have on asylum seekers coming to Australia by boats. A debate will allow students to hear both sides and allow them to make their own opinion on the matter. Debating a national and global event such as this is relatable as this is a current issue happening in Australia now. Following this, students can express their own opinions in the form of artwork. Students can create an informative poster or an effective artwork to use as a symbol for this event.

 

This resource is fantastic to use with stage 3 in HSIE as it addresses “real issues in the community” and prepares students “to be able to deal with the complex social… issues in the world around them” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.4). Furthermore, allowing students to debate provides them with the “opportunities, knowledge and skills to express their own perspectives and understandings… make their own judgments, and put these into action” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.12). This report is brief and concise and easily understood by the age groups in stage 3. The activities not only meet the requirements for the HSIE syllabus outcomes, but also links to other KLA’s such as Creative Arts VAS3.1, and English Language for interaction (ACELA1517).

 

References:

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

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Wyatt Roy speaks about democracy and voting in Australia - YouTube

Wyatt speaks to the Electoral Referendum Amendment Bill 2012 about Australia's voting system.
Molly Rose 's insight:

What is democracy?

 

This clip provides students with insight into the concept of democracy, and identifies that Australia is a democratic nation. This clip allows students to see Wyatt Roy, member for Longman QLD, discuss how he himself is displaying democracy by having a voice in Parliament. He also emphasises that all citizens have the right to vote and partake in decision making whether is be in the local, state or wider Australian community. This resource is suited for the Stage 3 level as it assists in addressing the HSIE change and continuity outcome that explains the development of the principles of Australian democracy. Students can relate to this as all students in the classroom have a right to have a voice and opinion, regardless of their race or gender.

 

Students will watch this clip as a class on an interactive white board or projector. Following the video, discuss with students that Australia is a democracy, and ask students reasons why think this is so. As a class, create a definition. Students can discuss what they think democracy is and where they see democracy in everyday life. Students can do this in partners, and write down ideas on a mind map.

A classroom activity could involve all students participate in a decision-making vote that undertakes democratic practices. This could involve all students taking on a role in a decision-making process, and have a mini election in class. This will allow students to mimic how local, state and federal elections are undertaken and use the same voting methods. Furthermore, each term the class or whole year group could elect a class and/or year president. Students that wish to run could prepare a short speech about why they deserve to be president, and what they will do throughout the term. For those students not running for the position, they are still able to listen to speeches and make their own decision based on what they have heard.

 

This resource is fantastic to use in the primary stage 3 classroom, as it allows students to “explore the democratic principles and values that underpin the individual’s right to a free and fair vote,” and exposes them to real life events that happen locally, nationally and globally (Dudgeon & Hincks, 2010, p. 11). Furthermore, the use of resources and activities such as those stated above meets the NSW HSIE syllabus outcome, CCS3.2 while also crossing other KLA’s such as English, Language for interaction (ACELA1517) (Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, 2014).

 

References:

 

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2014). English Curriculum. Retrieved 12 March, 2014 from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/english/Curriculum/F-10#level1

 

Dudgeon, P., and Hincks, P. (2010). Democracy Rules: An electoral education resource. Retrieved from http://www.aec.gov.au/education/Democracy_Rules/files/CompleteTeacherGuide.pdf

 

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Refugee Week

Refugee Week | HSIE Stage 3: Change & Continuity | Scoop.it
The Refugee Council of Australia is a non-profit peak organisation. Providing information about and on the advocacy for refugees and humanitarian entrants in Australia on behalf of its 90 organisational members and many individual members
Molly Rose 's insight:

National Refugee Week

 

National Refugee Week raises awareness about issues facing refugees in Australia and also recognises and celebrates their contributions to Australia. This resource can be used following the ‘Long Journey, Young Lives’ resource, as students have an understanding of why individuals seek refuge, and are aware that refugees are a global trend, as well as a national trend.

 

As a class assessment, students can use the ‘myths and facts about asylum seekers’ resource on the website to write a report to diminish any preconceived notions about refugees in Australia. Students will use this resource, as well as their knowledge and understanding gained from the previous activities to write a report, ‘The real Australian refugees’.

 

Students can use the information about refugees on this website and use persuasive texts to create flyers and/or posters to inform other students about Nation Refugee Week. As part of National Refugee Week, the school and in particular stage 3, can help to raise awareness and celebrate the diverse families in the school and the community. The school can hold an assembly where some students can read and present their reports. Students can also read their ‘diary entry’ they have previously written, and invite a student/s or members of the community who are refugees to tell the school of their journey. Furthermore, as a year or stage specific activity, students from all classes can come together, be divided into groups and create big mind maps on the significance of refugees to the Australian society, and issues and problems they might face when they arrive in their new country.

 

These activities will allow students to use their knowledge and understanding gained from the previous activities to express and “enact their own views of the world” and national and global events (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.12). Students will also be aware of the diverse families within their school, local community and wider nation and the problems they’ve faced fleeing their nations and residing and starting a new life in Australia. Students will also recognise the contributions of refugees to Australian society. Recognising National Refugee Week in the primary school setting allows all students to understand events that are occurring in their country and around the world, and provides students with “opportunities, knowledge and skills to express their own perspectives and understandings, tell their own stories, make their own judgments, and put these into action” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 12).

 

 

References:

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Long Journey - Young lives

Molly Rose 's insight:

‘Long Journey, Young Lives’

 

‘Long Journey, Young Lives’ is an interactive resource that appeals to primary students and allows them to view individual’s there own age discussing their experiences as a refugee. The site compares the opinions of Australian school children to young refugees. Students are able to see the progression of the refugee journey, from homeland conflict, the journey, detention centres and reflection on their journey. The stages allow students to understand the policies in place for refugees, and relates to current issues in Australia regarding ‘boat people’.

 

Following this activity, students can discuss as a class reasons why people have to seek refuge in a different country, and discuss where they think most refugees that come to Australia are from, and reasons why. Introduce a new vocabulary to students and define words such as refugee, migration, migrant, immigrant and asylum.

 

Students can construct a diary entry text that allows them to speak from the point of view of a refugee. Students can write a draft first, receive peer feedback and edit where needed. Students will be instructed to speak in first person, and use emotive and descriptive language to engage the audience, and create empathy between reader and the writer. Students will then post their diary entry onto a class blog, allowing other students to read the journey’s of their fellow peers and also gain an understanding of how people may experience events such as this in different ways. Individuals seeking refuge is a long standing global event, and in Australia it is a current issue that is putting pressure on political figures.

 

This resource is great to use with stage 3 as it appeals to the technology driven students of today. Students can work at their own pace and listen to the refugee’s journey to their new country. Students are able to take on a role and put themselves into the shoes of a child refugee. This activity also links to the English, text and context outcome (ACELY1698). Use of effective and contemporary resources in the classroom that link to current events such as refugees allows for the study of important social issues and “also the development of the skills of participation so that students can do something about the issues…” which is essential “to prepare students to enter a democratic society” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 15).

 

References:

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, May 5, 2014 1:22 AM

An interactive game that explores the experiences of young refugees.

Molly Rose's curator insight, November 24, 2014 5:42 PM

Long Journey, Young Lives’ is an interactive resource that appeals to primary students and allows them to view individual’s there own age discussing their experiences as a refugee. The site compares the opinions of Australian school children to young refugees. Students are able to see the progression of the refugee journey, from homeland conflict, the journey, detention centres and reflection on their journey. The stages allow students to understand the policies in place for refugees, and relates to current issues in Australia regarding ‘boat people’.

 

Following this activity, students can discuss as a class reasons why people have to seek refuge in a different country, and discuss where they think most refugees that come to Australia are from, and reasons why. Introduce a new vocabulary to students and define words such as refugee, migration, migrant, immigrant and asylum.

 

Students can construct a diary entry text that allows them to speak from the point of view of a refugee. Students can write a draft first, receive peer feedback and edit where needed. Students will be instructed to speak in first person, and use emotive and descriptive language to engage the audience, and create empathy between reader and the writer. Students will then post their diary entry onto a class blog, allowing other students to read the journey’s of their fellow peers and also gain an understanding of how people may experience events such as this in different ways. Individuals seeking refuge is a long standing global event, and in Australia it is a current issue that is putting pressure on political figures.

 

This resource is great to use with stage 3 as it appeals to the technology driven students of today. Students can work at their own pace and listen to the refugee’s journey to their new country. Students are able to take on a role and put themselves into the shoes of a child refugee. This activity also links to the English, text and context outcome (ACELY1698). Use of effective and contemporary resources in the classroom that link to current events such as refugees allows for the study of important social issues and “also the development of the skills of participation so that students can do something about the issues…” which is essential “to prepare students to enter a democratic society” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 15).

 

References:

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.).