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A sentence by sentence guide to writing a manifesto

A sentence by sentence guide to writing a manifesto | how to writing | Scoop.it
By Kim Mok...

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Teaching Writing – Activities and Ideas : EFL 2.0 – Teacher Talk

Teaching Writing – Activities and Ideas : EFL 2.0 – Teacher Talk | how to writing | Scoop.it

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First Bell: What happened to writing with pen and paper; Project Graduation parent meeting set / LJWorld.com

First Bell: What happened to writing with pen and paper; Project Graduation parent meeting set / LJWorld.com | how to writing | Scoop.it

• One of the interesting things about attending State Board of Education meetings is that you occasionally get to hear one of those "gee-whiz" presentations about some new technology that could revolutionize education. But one that was demonstrated Wednesday left me with a bag of mixed emotions.

The tool is called KWIET (pronounced "quiet"), which stands for the Kansas Writing Instruction and Evaluation Tool. As you might guess, it's a tool used to guide and evaluate writing assignments.

Photo by Nick Krug

Cordley School fifth-graders Chloe McNair, bottom left, Harper Kalar-Salisbury and Raegan Teenor laugh as they reach for the same package while trying to organize boxes for a food drive Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012. Seventy-one boxes of nonperishables were collected and given to representatives of the Cornerstone Southern Baptist Church food pantry, which provides needy children with "back-snack" foods to take home on the weekends.

Basically, it's a computer-based, online tool that can manage any kind of writing assignment for any subject, at any grade level. Teachers create projects for students to complete. Students enter the information in a system that looks much like Microsoft Word. Teachers can then review the student's work, make comments or suggestions directly in the document, and grade the work based on whatever rules are being applied.

At first blush, that sounds like a very expensive substitute for paper and pencil. But one thing it provides is a standard, objective way of grading papers. Most of us have not-so-fond memories of teachers who were overly critical, or who graded by inconsistent and unpredictable standards. Standardization, in turn, frees up teachers and others to move away from standardized, multiple-choice questions and design tests that require a little more creativity and critical thinking.


Via Charles Tiayon
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The Secret to Writing Your Dissertation

The Secret to Writing Your Dissertation | how to writing | Scoop.it
“I spent every night until four in the morning on my dissertation, until I came to the point when I could not write another word, not even the next letter. I went to bed. Eight o’clock the next morning I was up writing again.” -Abraham Pais, physicist

You’ve been in graduate school for many years now, and you’ve come a long way. You’ve completed all of your coursework, formed your Ph.D. thesis committee, passed your preliminary/oral/qualifying examinations, and have done an awful lot of research along the way. There’s a glimmer of hope in your heart that maybe — just maybe — this will be your last year in graduate school.

Image credit: East Tennessee State University's Department of Mathematics and Statistics.

You’ve probably even gotten some papers published along the way, with a handful of them (if you’re lucky) with you as the lead author! But there’s one more task you need to perform before you’re ready to defend in front of your committee: you must write that dissertation!

While there are many guides on how to do that, many of them are either jokes…

Image credit: Flickr user chnrdu.

…or people grossly overstating the task in front of you. There are some very important things that go into a dissertation, but there are also some huge misconceptions about what a dissertation is supposed to be. What follows is my advice for anyone who’s reached that stage in their careers, on how to write a dissertation. (At least, as far as theoretical astrophysics goes, although I’m sure this is applicable to many other fields.)


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Why Everyone Should Write a Manifesto

Why Everyone Should Write a Manifesto | how to writing | Scoop.it
Think manifestos are only for dictators or overachievers? Think again! Let Lifehack's Teresa Griffith explain why you too should write a manifesto.

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The Purdue OWL: The Writing Process

These OWL resources will help you with the writing process: pre-writing (invention), developing research questions and outlines, composing thesis statements, and proofreading.

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Good Writing is The Key to Success - Annenberg TV News (blog)

Good Writing is The Key to Success - Annenberg TV News (blog) | how to writing | Scoop.it

Good Writing is The Key to SuccessAnnenberg TV News (blog)Having good writing and copy editing skills are things that are necessary when working on both the website and the newscast. At times I feel I underestimate just how important copy editing is.


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KARACHI CHRONICLE: Writing skills | Business Recorder

KARACHI CHRONICLE: Writing skills | Business Recorder | how to writing | Scoop.it

Karachi is said to have the highest literacy rate in the country. This does not appear to be true because one comes across so many, hundreds and thousands of people who cannot read. But I personally know readers outnumber illiterates. I am a frequent traveller by rickshaw and occasionally by bus. I always try to locate where the driver has tucked his daily newspaper. It is usually between the overhead bar and the roof in rirkshaws and to the left of the driver's seat in a bus. I also talk to people and find they can read.

Those who cannot read are the poorest of the poor or people who came to the city from villages in search of work. In short, all Karachiites can read. However, there is a puzzling phenomena: the majority of people who can read cannot write. That makes Karachiites half-literate. No matter how many reports I browsed through, written by educationists, social workers and NGOs on Karachi's literacy, I have not found any which even noticed this peculiarity.

It is also said that the ability to read is growing by leaps and bounds thanks to the mobile cellphone and the popularity of text messaging. It may be so, but it is not proof that the ability to text message means the ability to write. Ask people of the working class to write on a piece of paper and they cannot do it. The clue to this puzzle is in the high rate of school dropouts, and also in the absence of the slate and chalk from the schoolchild's satchel. In most schools in bastis and in the lower-middle class areas too, you will find a blackboard, usually just a wall painted black, on which the teacher writes something and the children recite what ever is written. Thus they pick up reading skill faster than they learn to write. Children dropout of school normally after class two.

Most are forced to leave to help support the family, working at menial jobs. As they grow older they may learn to drive a vehicle, become mechanics at garages, welders and carpenters, factory workers and other semi-skilled jobs. Their ability to read comes in handy but they do not seem to need the ability to write. Their writhing skill usually is limited to the ability to write their name and they like to have a wiggly signature to put on a form or their NIC card, while the rest of the data is filled in by some helpful person or a professional writer.

There are many NGOs who believe that it is not necessary to have the writing skill, which is why handwriting is not stressed. They say a person who can read can recognise the letters of the alphabet on the keyboard and tap the right key to spell a word. I was surprised to learn from them that in America in the poor areas children are taught to use the keyboard and handwriting is not taught.


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