To what extent is Google Street View compromising privacy?
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Introduction

Introduction | To what extent is Google Street View compromising privacy? | Scoop.it
Katelyn Pendergast's insight:

On March 12, 2013, attorney generals for thirty-eight states reached an agreement with Google resulting in a seven million dollar settlement relating to privacy and protection concerns involving Google Street View.   This means that slightly over three-quarters of the United States has already had an issue with Street View.  With so much concern relating to privacy, over this tool, the world may be better off without it.   Intimate life details, embarrassing moments being broadcasted, crimes being captured, and criminals gaining too much information are just some of the privacy concerns that consumers have about Google Street View.

 

One of the biggest controversies involving Google Street View actually had nothing to do with what the camera could see.  When Google Street View first began, an engineer found a way for a Google Street car to pick up information from open Wi-Fi networks. This violated the Data Protection Act.  Google needs better checking methods of its employees.  There should be screening on a daily basis to make sure Google’s employees are acting with integrity when their job involves such sensitive information.  Although this problem was shockingly intrusive, most of the concern over Google Street View lies with what the camera’s capture.

 

Debate over whether Google has the right to show sensitive information like women’s and homeless shelters, licenses plates, and faces is a touchy subject.  Countries with stricter laws than the United States have been arguing with Google to prevent them from doing this.  Numerous countries have set limitations on how high the cameras can look up from the Google car along with restrictions on making some images they capture blurry.  Setting limitations on Google Street View is crucial for keeping people safe.  Criminals can use information they find while searching out an area in Google Street View to harm others. 

 

If Google Street View is put to good use, it can be a great tool.  However, limitations need to exist to make it worthwhile to have on the web.  In addition, Google as a company knows right from wrong and should have the decency to remove images that can embarrass, humiliate, or harm people.

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Embarrassing Google Street View

Embarrassing Google Street View | To what extent is Google Street View compromising privacy? | Scoop.it
Ever done something embarrasing on the street? Thanks to google we can now watch.
Katelyn Pendergast's insight:

Out of the courtesy for people, Google Street View should not post embarrassing moments.  It is not right to post someone getting into a car with their underwear hanging out or someone falling off a bike. This invades basic privacy rights.  Even though there is no face, or compromising information being shown in this picture, it has been used across the web for people to laugh at which is embarrassing and humiliating.  

 

Other pictures I have found while conducting my searches about Google Street View include individuals walking into strip clubs, adult book stores, and women sun bathing.  All three of these situations are sensitive topics to be posting about online of people doing without thier knowledge.  Like the Swiss, the United States should make stricter laws about what Google can and cannot post online.

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Swiss Court Orders Modifications to Google Street View

Swiss Court Orders Modifications to Google Street View | To what extent is Google Street View compromising privacy? | Scoop.it
Google maintained its right to document residential streets with its Street View technology, but it must blur out sensitive facilities and notify communities in advance.
Katelyn Pendergast's insight:

The United States is not the only country that is having issues concerning privacy and Street View.  Switzerland takes the protection and privacy of it’s residents very seriously.  After a court case, the Swiss ruled that Google has to blur out at least 99% of faces, licenses plates and other identifying markers.  A 99% success rate is ridiculous for such sensitive information that can be collected by Google's street view.  That means 1/100 faces will not be blurred and 1/100 licenses plates numbers can be found.  Even such a low percentage as 1% of this type of data being found by whomever on the web can be harmful and threaten the safety of the unfortunate person who decided just to take their car for a drive or walk down the street that day.

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Google faces new Street View data controversy

Google faces new Street View data controversy | To what extent is Google Street View compromising privacy? | Scoop.it
Search giant admits it has not deleted all of the data it secretly collected from internet users around the UK. By Josh Halliday
Katelyn Pendergast's insight:

An engineer at Google developed a way to collect information about people from their unprotected Wi-Fi network while driving through neighborhoods.  This information ranges from internet history all the way to usernames and passwords of important websites.  Then, Google decided to not delete all the collected data immediately.  This is just the beginning to the problems that Street View has created.  Although Street View is a valuable tool, Google needs to make sure that its staff works with integrity, or else Street View’s benefits will not outweigh it's risks.

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Google Zooms In Too Close for Some - New York Times

Google Zooms In Too Close for Some - New York Times | To what extent is Google Street View compromising privacy? | Scoop.it
A new online feature of Google Maps called Street View is stirring up a debate over privacy concerns on the Web.
Katelyn Pendergast's insight:

Limitations and laws need to be put on Google Street View.  Google should not be able to invade people's privacy by taking snapshots and zooming in on their homes.  This article proves that Google is invading privacy because this person lived on the second floor of her apartment building and her cat could be seen from the Google Street View image.  What's next? Are we going to be seeing people's computers with private information pulled up on the screen in Google Street View?

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20 Crimes Caught on Google Street View

20 Crimes Caught on Google Street View | To what extent is Google Street View compromising privacy? | Scoop.it
With Big Brother -- er, Google watching, no crime is hidden from view. Here are just a few instances of crime and punishment caught on its Street View feature. 1.
Katelyn Pendergast's insight:

If a crime is caught on Google Street View, should this evidence be able to be used against the accused in court?  What happens if a person in authority notices the illegal action years after the action occurs? Is this just the government acting like our "Big Brother" through Google and breaching in our privacy? Yes, it doesn't matter, and no!! Since Google Street View is going to be around whether we like it or not, we may as well use it to our advantage.  Google Street View images should be allowed to be used against the accused in court.  While surfing the web, I have found images of people starting fires, kids aiming guns at kids, and various other images of crimes. This is large piece of evidence that can be used in court to help solve various non violent and violent crimes.

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How Criminals Use Google Maps Street View to 'Case The Joint'

How Criminals Use Google Maps Street View to 'Case The Joint' | To what extent is Google Street View compromising privacy? | Scoop.it
Learn how criminals are using Google Maps Street View to help them 'case the joint' before they rob your house.
Katelyn Pendergast's insight:

Is having Google Street View available to everyone on a daily basis worth risking robberies?  This is the question that I am left wondering. Criminals, with more ease than ever, can just simply type an address into Google Maps and scope out the scene of a crime.  This is making their job way too easy.  There is almost no benefit to the average person that Google Street View can provide by showing close ups of houses and businesses. 

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