How Earth Made Us - Wind
52 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by art0001
Scoop.it!

Box 3 : Warmer Oceans, Stronger Hurricanes : Scientific American

Box 3 : Warmer Oceans, Stronger Hurricanes : Scientific American | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
Scientific American is the world's premier magazine of scientific discovery and technological innovation for the general public.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by art0001
Scoop.it!

Global warming systemically caused Hurricane Sandy « The Berkeley Blog

Global warming systemically caused Hurricane Sandy « The Berkeley Blog | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by art0001
Scoop.it!

Why Does Earth Have Deserts?

Subscribe to MinuteEarth - it's FREE! - http://dft.ba/-minuteearth_sub Why Does Earth Have Deserts? For the same reason it has Rainforests: Hadley Cells!!! T...
more...
waw0004's curator insight, July 25, 2013 12:19 AM

This also would help with wind patterns

Scooped by art0001
Scoop.it!

A Timeline of Hurricane Sandy’s Path of Destruction

A Timeline of Hurricane Sandy’s Path of Destruction | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
  Hurricane Sandy will be remembered as a raging freak of nature that became one of the most destructive storms in U.S. history. Here is a timeline from Sandy’s birth deep in the Caribbean Sea to its dissipation over Pennsylvania nine days later.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by art0001
Scoop.it!

MinuteEarth: The Story of Our Planet

Subscribe to MinuteEarth - it's FREE! - http://dft.ba/-minuteearth_sub Agriculture, hula hoops, SARS, and THIS video: how long did they take to get around th...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by art0001
Scoop.it!

OCHA Flash Update 2 - China | Tropical Cyclone Soulik, 16 July ...

OCHA Flash Update 2 - China | Tropical Cyclone Soulik, 16 July ... | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
According to the National Meteorological Centre of China (NMC), Typhoon Soulik was downgraded to a Tropical Depression in Nancheng County, Jiangxi Province at 5.00 am on the 14 July. With this, the NMC downgraded ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by art0001 from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy

The Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
After cutting a destructive path through the Caribbean, Hurricane Sandy caused extensive damage along the East Coast this week.

 

While the damage wasn't as bad as many feared it could have been, place and spatial context are especially important in assessing the impacts of a natural disaster.  This is a excellent collection of the many devastating images as a result of Hurricane Sandy.  To see some more local images, Rhode Island Department of Transportation put this collection together.   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 6, 2012 10:18 PM
I am speechless, these images have just torn my heart. Here in Providence, Rhode Island listened to multiple people say "oh this storm was nothing" they apparently need to view these photos, to understand Sandy was a monster of a storm. Mother nature is powerful and she can do just about anything. I am so mind boggled by the images, roads completely torn apart I never knew this could happen from a hurricane. It really made me appreciate how safe I was but now seeing these images really makes me want to get out there and tell more people to look at what happened in NJ,CT,NYC, and other places around the coast. My next step now is to get a donation bin started to send over to those states in major need. This is sure another natural disaster to go down in history.
Jordan Zemanek's comment, October 3, 2013 11:11 PM
Just with the information given, I can see how much damage the storm actually caused. Flooding and high winds obviously don't go together well. Although some communities weren't hit as bad as previously anticipated, some areas were largely damaged and the money needed to rebuild will be tremendous.
Alaina Rahn's comment, October 4, 2013 10:14 AM
I think it is very sad. I didn't know it was that bad. Now that I see those pictures it makes me feel very bad for those people.
Rescooped by art0001 from Climate Chaos News
Scoop.it!

'Brown ocean' can fuel inland tropical cyclones

'Brown ocean' can fuel inland tropical cyclones | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
In the summer of 2007, Tropical Storm Erin stumped meteorologists. Most tropical cyclones dissipate after making landfall, weakened by everything from friction and wind shear to loss of the ocean as a source of heat energy.

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by art0001
Scoop.it!

Superstorm Sandy Coverage - Oct 28-31 - The Weather Channel

Get the latest breaking news and information on Hurricane Sandy as it impacts the east coast. Subscribe to The Weather Channel for top weather and outdoor vi...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by art0001
Scoop.it!

NOAA predicts active 2013 Atlantic hurricane season

NOAA predicts active 2013 Atlantic hurricane season | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
In its 2013 Atlantic hurricane season outlook issued today, NOAA's Climate Prediction Center is forecasting an active or extremely active season this year. For the six-month hurricane season, which begins June 1, NOAA's ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by art0001
Scoop.it!

Improvements in Tropical Cyclone Forecasting | SSEC News

Improvements in Tropical Cyclone Forecasting | SSEC News | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
Improvements in Tropical Cyclone Forecasting. Posted on July 15, 2013 in News Articles. This July, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) implemented routine use of the newest version of a formula, or algorithm, ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by art0001
Scoop.it!

We're losing Malibu and Nantucket. This is why we can't wait to address climate change.

We're losing Malibu and Nantucket. This is why we can't wait to address climate change. | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
If you wait for a crisis to reach your doorstep, it'll be too late to act. The story of beach homes threatened by the encroaching sea is an example of why we need to act now to slow climate change. (We're losing Malibu and Nantucket.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by art0001
Scoop.it!

GPS Reveals Hurricane Wind Speeds - National Geographic

GPS Reveals Hurricane Wind Speeds - National Geographic | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
National Geographic
GPS Reveals Hurricane Wind Speeds
National Geographic
Now, a new paper reports that such wind speed measurements can be used with confidence when conditions are right, even to measure the winds of hurricanes.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by art0001
Scoop.it!

HowStuffWorks "Focus on Focus Earth: Global Warming and Hurricanes: What's the Connection?"

HowStuffWorks "Focus on Focus Earth: Global Warming and Hurricanes: What's the Connection?" | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
Global warming and hurricanes are explained in this article. Learn about global warming and hurricanes.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by art0001
Scoop.it!

NASA - Hurricane Sandy (Atlantic Ocean)

NASA - Hurricane Sandy (Atlantic Ocean) | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
Hurricane Sandy came ashore in northern New Jersey Oct. 29, 2012, and as the powerful storm made its way along the east coast it brought damage to NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops Island, Va.
art0001's insight:

the video on this shows the path of sandy

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by art0001
Scoop.it!

Hurricane Sandy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hurricane Sandy was the deadliest and most destructive hurricane of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season, as well as the second-costliest hurricane in United States history. Classified as the eighteenth named storm, tenth hurricane and second major hurricane of the year, Sandy was a Category 3 storm at its peak intensity when it made landfall in Cuba.[1] While it was a Category 2 storm off the coast of the Northeastern United States, the storm became the largest Atlantic hurricane on record (as measured by diameter, with winds spanning 1,100 miles (1,800 km)).[2][3] Estimates as of June 2013 assess damage to have been over $68 billion (2013 USD), a total surpassed only by Hurricane Katrina.[4] At least 286 people were killed along the path of the storm in seven countries.[5] The severe and widespread damage the storm caused in the United States, as well as its unusual merge with a frontal system, resulted in the nicknaming of the hurricane by the media and several organizations of the U.S. government "Superstorm Sandy".[6][7][8][9]

Sandy developed from a tropical wave in the western Caribbean Sea on October 22, quickly strengthened, and was upgraded to Tropical Storm Sandy six hours later. Sandy moved slowly northward toward the Greater Antilles and gradually intensified. On October 24, Sandy became a hurricane, made landfall near Kingston, Jamaica, a few hours later, re-emerged into the Caribbean Sea and strengthened into a Category 2 hurricane. On October 25, Sandy hit Cuba as a Category 3 hurricane, then weakened to a Category 1 hurricane. Early on October 26, Sandy moved through the Bahamas.[10] On October 27, Sandy briefly weakened to a tropical storm and then restrengthened to a Category 1 hurricane. Early on October 29, Sandy curved north-northwest and then[11] moved ashore near Brigantine, New Jersey, just to the northeast of Atlantic City, as a post-tropical cyclone with hurricane-force winds.[1][12]

In Jamaica, winds left 70% of residents without electricity, blew roofs off buildings, killed one, and caused about $100 million (2012 USD) in damage. In Haiti, Sandy's outer bands brought flooding that killed at least 54, caused food shortages, and left about 200,000 homeless. In the Dominican Republic, two died. In Puerto Rico, one man was swept away by a swollen river. In Cuba, there was extensive coastal flooding and wind damage inland, destroying some 15,000 homes, killing 11, and causing $2 billion (2012 USD) in damage. In The Bahamas, two died amid an estimated $700 million (2012 USD) in damage. In Canada, two were killed in Ontario and an estimated $100 million (2012 CAD) in damage was caused throughout Ontario and Quebec.[13]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by art0001
Scoop.it!

NASA sees Tropical Storm Cimaron pass between Taiwan and the ...

NASA sees Tropical Storm Cimaron pass between Taiwan and the ... | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
Tropical Depression 08W strengthened into a tropical storm and was renamed Cimaron by the morning of July 17. NASA's Aqua satellite captured the storm is it passed between the northern Philippines and Taiwan.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by art0001 from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
Scoop.it!

More storms, more heat says World Meteorological Organization | Climate News Network

More storms, more heat says World Meteorological Organization | Climate News Network | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it

If you think the world is warming and the weather getting nastier, you’re right, according to the United Nations agency committed to understanding weather and climate.

 

The World Meteorological Organization says the planet “experienced unprecedented high-impact climate extremes” in the ten years from 2001 to 2010, the warmest decade since the start of modern measurements in 1850.

 

Those ten years also continued an extended period of accelerating global warming, with more national temperature records reported broken than in any previous decade. Sea levels rose about twice as fast as the trend in the last century.

 

A WMO report, The Global Climate 2001-2010, A Decade of Climate Extremes, analyses global and regional temperatures and precipitation, and extreme weather such as the heat waves in Europe and Russia, Hurricane Katrina in the US, tropical cyclone Nargis in Myanmar, droughts in the Amazon basin, Australia and East Africa, and floods in Pakistan.

 

It says the decade was the warmest for both hemispheres, and for both land and ocean surface temperatures. There was a rapid decline in Arctic sea ice and accelerating loss of net mass from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets and from the world’s glaciers.

 

This melting and the thermal expansion of sea water caused global mean sea levels to rise about three millimetres annually, about double the observed 20th century trend of 1.6 mm per year. Global sea level averaged over the decade was about 20 cm higher than in 1880, the report says.

 

Global-average atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide rose to 389 parts per million in 2010, 39% higher than at the start of the industrial era in 1750. Methane rose to 1,808.0 parts per billion (158%) and nitrous oxide to 323.2 ppb (20%).

 

The WMO secretary-general, Michel Jarraud, said: “A decade is the minimum possible timeframe for meaningful assessments of climate change.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by art0001 from La Mer et l'Homme
Scoop.it!

Of tropical cyclones and internal waves

Of tropical cyclones and internal waves | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
A very astute meteorologist pointed me towards this awesome satellite image in the Indian Ocean.

Via Nausicaa Sea News
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by art0001 from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Hurricane Sandy may be unprecedented in East Coast storm history

Hurricane Sandy may be unprecedented in East Coast storm history | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
WEATHER GANG | With computer models locked in on the eventuality of a punishing blow for East Coast from Hurricane Sandy, analyses suggest this storm may be unlike anything the region has ever experienced.

 

This weekend's storm for the East coast is especially interesting.  I won't pretend to be a meteorologist, so I'll quote one: "The upper-air steering pattern that is part of the puzzle is not all that unheard of. It happens when the atmosphere gets blocked over the Atlantic and the flow over the U.S. doubles back on itself. Sometimes big winter storms are involved.  The freak part is that a hurricane happens to be in the right place in the world to get sucked into this doubled-back channel of air and pulled inland from the coast."  Stay safe everyone on the east coast.   

 

Tags:  weather and climate, physical, disasters. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by art0001 from Cayo Scoop! The Ecology of Cayo Culture
Scoop.it!

The Peak Of Hurricane Season Doesn't Disappoint

The Peak Of Hurricane Season Doesn't Disappoint | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it

The title says it all.  We're more than halfway through hurrican season, and now past the average peak.  Here's to no more hurricanes!

 

"The season got off to an early start with Tropical Storm Alberto and Tropical Storm Beryl developing before the official start to hurricane season on June 1st.  Since then the Atlantic Basin has produced eleven more named storms, five hurricanes and one major hurricane (Michael).  Eight of the thirteen named storms so far this year formed in the month of August...  Since 1966, the average hurricane season produces eleven named storms, six hurricanes and three major hurricanes."


Via Best of Cayo
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by art0001
Scoop.it!

Hurricane Sandy Fast Facts - CNN International

Hurricane Sandy Fast Facts
CNN International
October 27, 2012 - The National Weather Service downgrades Sandy to a tropical storm. - Sandy strengthens to a Category 1 hurricane with sustained winds of 75 mph.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by art0001
Scoop.it!

Hurricane season: Predicting in advance what could happen - Science Daily (press release)

Hurricane season: Predicting in advance what could happen - Science Daily (press release) | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
Hurricane season: Predicting in advance what could happen Science Daily (press release) With the onset of hurricane season, NISAC has two jobs: conducting annual "hurricane swath" analyses of probable impacts on the Gulf Coast and East Coast and...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by art0001
Scoop.it!

Delaware beaches worry about the next big storm - USA TODAY

Delaware beaches worry about the next big storm - USA TODAY | How Earth Made Us - Wind | Scoop.it
Delaware beaches worry about the next big storm
USA TODAY
Federal weather experts have predicted 13 to 20 named tropical storms this year, with up to 11 becoming hurricanes and as many as six reaching major storm status with winds of 111 mph or more.
more...
No comment yet.