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Astrophysicists discover earliest known ‘starburst’ galaxy in Universe

Astrophysicists discover earliest known ‘starburst’ galaxy in Universe | How do I know | Scoop.it

University of Sussex astronomers using the Herschel Space Observatory are part of an international team that has discovered a distant star-forming galaxy that challenges the current theories of galaxy evolution.


Via Michele Diodati
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Alvarez Puga: A 10 años de la Guerra en Irak

Alvarez Puga: A 10 años de la Guerra en Irak | How do I know | Scoop.it
En este espacio de Bitácora Álvarez Puga abordaremos un tema concerniente a la seguridad internacional, más que nada enfocado en torno a la guerra en Irak y a lo que ha pasado en dicho país después de 10 años de que se suscitará ésta.
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Images and insights on star death: Supernova 1987A

Images and insights on star death:  Supernova 1987A | How do I know | Scoop.it

Awesome new images of Supernova 1987A at radio wavelengths, and a suggestion that the expanding supernova remnant does not contain a black hole.


Via Michele Diodati
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Pluto Could Have Ten Moons

Pluto Could Have Ten Moons | How do I know | Scoop.it

A recent simulation predicts that NASA’s New Horizons probe could slam into a rocky killing field encircling the “binary planet” Pluto-Charon, during its 2015 flyby. That’s according to a new theoretical dynamical simulation that predicts there could be as many as10 moons circling the distant world — plus one or more ring systems.


Via Michele Diodati
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So It Begins: Darpa Sets Out to Make Computers That Can Teach Themselves | Danger Room | Wired.com

So It Begins: Darpa Sets Out to Make Computers That Can Teach Themselves | Danger Room | Wired.com | How do I know | Scoop.it
The Pentagon's blue-sky researchers are eying computers that can learn on their own, which could make for some advanced new smart machines -- which are simple enough for non-experts to use as well.

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Astronomy: Star tracker

Astronomy: Star tracker | How do I know | Scoop.it

As an early adopter of astronomical technology, Andrea Ghez is revealing secrets about the giant black hole at the Galaxy's centre.


Via Michele Diodati
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Fossil Found on Brazilian Beach Key to Blue Whale Survival | Environment News Service

Fossil Found on Brazilian Beach Key to Blue Whale Survival | Environment News Service | How do I know | Scoop.it
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Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Earth Observation for biodiversity surveillance: technology for policy implementation | IALE 2013 European Congress

Earth Observation for biodiversity surveillance: technology for policy implementation | IALE 2013 European Congress | How do I know | Scoop.it
Earth Observation for biodiversity surveillance: technology for policy ... http://t.co/HcyrhRSRru

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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US government sued over use of pesticides linked to bee harm

US government sued over use of pesticides linked to bee harm | How do I know | Scoop.it
Beekeepers, conservation and food campaigners accuse Environmental Protection Agency of failing to protect the insects

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Sabine Thirion's comment, March 23, 2013 5:34 AM
On avance, ça commence a vraiment bouger...
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Earth-like waves create clear "windows" deep into Jupiter's atmosphere

Earth-like waves create clear "windows" deep into Jupiter's atmosphere | How do I know | Scoop.it

Scientists say they have new clues about a phenomenon on Jupiter dubbed "hot spots," cloudless patches providing a window deep into the planet's atmosphere.


Via Michele Diodati
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Hallan un mecanismo de transferencia de genes entre distintos organismos / Noticias

Hallan un mecanismo de transferencia de genes entre distintos organismos / Noticias | How do I know | Scoop.it

Científicos del Centro de Biología Molecular Severo Ochoa ha comprobado que en la proteínas terminales de virus bacteriófagos existen señales de localización nuclear. "Se trata de un hallazgo inesperado que permite proponer un nuevo mecanismo en el que los bacteriófagos (virus que infectan bacterias) serían mediadores en la transferencia horizontal de genes entre organismos procariotas y eucariotas a lo largo de la evolución", según los investigadores,


Via Raquel Ordoñez
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Sara Brightman’s Space Trip Under Question | Roscosmos

Sara Brightman’s Space Trip Under Question | Roscosmos | How do I know | Scoop.it

KOROLYOV, Moscow region, March 16 (RIA Novosti) – Russia’s space agency Roscosmos and NASA may opt against sending music star Sarah Brightman to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2015, Russian agency’s head Vladimir Popovkin said on Saturday.

 

Brightman’s trip to orbit depends on the duration of the 2015 visiting flight to the ISS, Popovkin told journalists.

 

The British soprano was set to go on an eight-day trip to the station, but NASA and Roskosmos are considering extending the visiting flight to one month, in which case she would have to give up her seat to a professional spaceman, Popovkin said.

 

 


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Mars One introduction film (updated version)

This movie shows how Mars One plans to establish a human settlement on Mars in 2023. Click on the red button [=] in the bottom to change the subtitles.

 

For more information visit www.mars-one.com

 

 


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Late-Holocene Bird Extinction Linked to Human Colonization

Late-Holocene Bird Extinction Linked to Human Colonization | How do I know | Scoop.it
A new research suggests that more than 1,000 bird species became extinct on Pacific islands following human colonization.

 

Scientists had long known extinction rates in the region were high but estimates varied from 800 to 2,000 bird species. The researchers led by Prof Tim Blackburn of the University of Tennessee studied the extinction rates of nonperching land birds on Pacific islands from 700 to 3,500 years ago. They used fossil records from 41 Pacific islands such as Hawaii and Fiji to run an analytical technique called the Bayesian mark-recapture method. This allowed them to model gaps in the fossil record for more than 300 Pacific islands and estimate the number of unknown extinct species.

“We used information on what species are currently on the islands and what species are in the fossil record to estimate the probability of finding a species in the fossil record,” said co-author Prof Alison Boyer, also from the University of Tennessee.

 

The team found that nearly 983, or two-thirds, of land bird populations disappeared between the years of the first human arrival and European colonization. Disappearances are linked to overhunting by people, forest clearance and introduced species.

 

“We calculate that human colonization of remote Pacific islands caused the global extinction of close to a thousand species of nonperching land birds alone,” Prof Boyer said. “However, it is likely there are more species that were affected by human presence. Sea bird and perching bird extinctions will add to this total.”

 

Species lost include several species of moa-nalos, large flightless waterfowl from Hawai’i, and the New Caledonian Sylviornis, a relative of the game birds but which weighed in at around 30 kg, three times as heavy as a swan.

 

The researchers found the extinction rates differed depending on island and species characteristics. For example, larger islands had lower rates of extinction because they had larger populations of each bird species. Islands with more rainfall also had lower extinction rates because they experienced less deforestation by settlers. Bird species that were flightless and large-bodied had a higher rate of extinction because they were easier and more profitable to hunt and their lower rates of population growth inhibited recovery from overhunting or habitat loss.

 

“Flightless species were 33 times more likely to go extinct than those that could fly,” Prof Boyer explained. “Also, species that only populated a single island were 24 more times likely to go extinct than widespread species.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Deborah Verran's comment, April 13, 2013 6:39 PM
This image of the moa is one of the birds that became extinct in New Zealand after colonization. The adult birds were taller than humans.
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Power behind primordial soup discovered

Power behind primordial soup discovered | How do I know | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of Leeds may have solved a key puzzle about how objects from space could have kindled life on Earth. While it is generally accepted that some important ingredients for life came from meteorites bombarding the early Earth, scientists have not been able to explain how that inanimate rock transformed into the building blocks of life.


Via Michele Diodati
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Nanoscribe: 3D Scaffolds for Biomimetics for Cell Biology

Nanoscribe: 3D Scaffolds for Biomimetics for Cell Biology | How do I know | Scoop.it

3D polymer scaffolds for cells: Biocompatible 3D microstructures act as artificial extracellular matrices for cells to mimic a natural but reproducible environment. Other applications are the fabrication of micro-needles, stents and so on for medical purposes.

 

Shown are a series of structures fabricated by means of the direct laser writing technique with Photonic Professional systems. Typical topics of interest which are under investigation are the study of cell migration or stem cell differentiation. The 3D tailored environment acts as an artificial extracellular matrix, i.e., a scaffold for the cells. Pictures: F. Klein, B. Richter J. Fischer, T. Striebel und M. Bastmeyer; Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT). 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Potential ‘Comet of the Century’: NASA satellite takes new photo

Potential ‘Comet of the Century’: NASA satellite takes new photo | How do I know | Scoop.it

"Comet ISON has the potential to be among the brightest comets of the last 50 years, which gives us a rare opportunity to observe its changes in great detail and over an extended period," NASA’s official website quoted an astronomer with University of Maryland at College Park (UMCP), Dennis Bodewits, who helped obtain the new image.


Via Michele Diodati
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Commercial Trade in American Bullfrogs Spreads Deadly Fungus | Environment News Service

Commercial Trade in American Bullfrogs Spreads Deadly Fungus | Environment News Service | How do I know | Scoop.it
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Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera , Julio Gorosito
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XCOR Aerospace Announces Significant Propulsion Milestone on Lynx Suborbital Vehicle

XCOR Aerospace Announces Significant Propulsion Milestone on Lynx Suborbital Vehicle | How do I know | Scoop.it

March 26, 2013, Mojave, California - XCOR Aerospace today announced a first in aviation and space history, the firing of a full piston pump-powered rocket engine. This breakthrough is the foundation for fully reusable spacecraft that can fly multiple times per day, every day. It is a game changing technology that has the power to fundamentally alter the way we as a society view, visit, and utilize the abundant resources around our planet and in our solar system.

 

The initial portion of XCOR's pump test program culminated in a 67-second engine run with the propulsion system mated to the flight weight Lynx fuselage.  After the installation of the flight sized liquid oxygen tank, the next test sequence will extend the engine run duration to the full powered flight duration of the Lynx Mark I suborbital vehicle.


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What happens to wildlife when wetlands go dry?

What happens to wildlife when wetlands go dry? | How do I know | Scoop.it
Stubborn drought has dried up the Central Flyway, a key migration route for birds moving north and south

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Bacteria with vuvuzelas use a channel protein as a syringe for injecting a cocktail of toxins

Bacteria with vuvuzelas use a channel protein as a syringe for injecting a cocktail of toxins | How do I know | Scoop.it

The bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens is a constant companion of some roundworms. These worms assault insect larvae, thereby infecting them with the bacteria; the pathogens then attack the cells of their victims with a deadly cocktail of various toxins. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology in Dortmund working together with colleagues from Freiburg University and Jacobs University Bremen, have discovered that the bacteria use an important toxin complex like a syringe. It makes its way into the host cells via constricted vesicles in the cell membranes, and modifies their structure from within.

 

Part of the toxin complex then forces its way inside the cell through the vesicle membrane by means of a vuvuzela-like protein channel, and kills the cell. Important toxins of Photorhabdus luminescens are counted among the ABC toxins, which consist of the three protein components TcA, TcB and TcC. The toxin complex first docks at receptor molecules on the membrane of the host cell and is sucked inside the cell in small membrane blisters called vesicles. The TcC components then make their way into the cell fluid and demolish the cell’s protein skeleton. What has remained unclear to date, however, was how the protein managed to get through the vesicle membrane.

 

Now, for the first time, scientists have been able to decode the structure ofPhotorhabdus luminescens’ ABC toxins using cryoelectron microscopy and single particle analysis. This shows that the bacterium’s TcA protein consists of five subunits that together form the shape of a bell. “Inside the bell, the subunits form a channel that has one wide and one narrow aperture, so that it looks like the notorious vuvuzela horn used by South African football fans”, explains Stefan Raunser of the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Astronomers Detect Extremely Rare Triple Quasar

Astronomers Detect Extremely Rare Triple Quasar | How do I know | Scoop.it

By combining multiple telescope observations and advanced modeling, a multinational team of astronomers has discovered an extremely rare triple quasar system – only the second such object ever found.

 

Quasars are powerful sources of energy that sit in the center of a galaxy, surrounding a black hole. In systems with multiple quasars, the bodies are held together by gravity and are believed to be the product of galaxies colliding.

 

It is very difficult to observe triplet quasar systems, because of observational limits that prevent researchers from differentiating multiple nearby bodies from one another at astronomical distances.

 

The team combined observations from ESO’s New Technology Telescope at La Silla, Chile, and from the Calar Alto Observatory in Spain with advanced modelling. This enabled them to find the quasar, labeled QQQ J1519+0627.

 

The light from this object has traveled 9 billion light years to reach us, which means the light was emitted when the Universe was only a third of its current age.

 

Advanced analysis confirmed that what the team found was indeed three distinct sources of quasar energy and that the phenomenon is extremely rare.

 

“Honing our observational and modeling skills and finding this rare stellar phenomenon will help us understand how cosmic structures assemble in our universe and the basic processes by which massive galaxies form,” said Dr Michele Fumagalli from Princeton University and Carnegie Observatories.

 

Two members of the triplet are closer to each other than the third. This means that the system could have been formed by interaction between the two adjacent quasars, but was probably not triggered by interaction with the more-distant third quasar. Furthermore, no evidence was seen of any ultra-luminous inferred galaxies, which is where quasars are commonly found. As a result, the astronomers propose that this triplet quasar system is part of some larger structure that is still undergoing formation.

 

“Further study will help us figure out exactly how these quasars came to be and how rare their formation is,” said lead author Dr Emanuele Farina of the Universita degli Studi dell’Insubria and the Universit`a degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca.

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Patentan un método para reducir los efectos secundarios de la quimioterapia

Patentan un método para reducir los efectos secundarios de la quimioterapia | How do I know | Scoop.it

Investigadores del Centro de Investigación Príncipe Felipe y de la Fundación Investigación e Innovación para el Desarrollo Social han desarrollado y patentado un procedimiento para la eliminación de metales pesados en disolución. Ahora van aplicar este método en un proyecto experimental para la eliminación de cisplatino excedente en sangre. Este metal, utilizado en tratamientos de quimioterapia, es responsable de efectos secundarios como toxicidad renal, náuseas, vómitos y alteraciones sanguíneas en pacientes con cáncer.


Via Raquel Ordoñez
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Desarrollan un nuevo método de reprogramación celular más seguro y rápido

Desarrollan un nuevo método de reprogramación celular más seguro y rápido | How do I know | Scoop.it

Un equipo de científicos con participación española ha definido una nueva técnica de reprogramación mediante el cual se obtienen células más seguras y en menos tiempo que con los métodos desarrollados anteriormente. El trabajo se publica esta semana en Nature Methods.


Via Raquel Ordoñez
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Bat-Eating Spiders Are Everywhere, Study Finds

Bat-Eating Spiders Are Everywhere, Study Finds | How do I know | Scoop.it
There's only one place in the world to escape bat-catching spiders: Antarctica. These arachnids ensnare and pounce on bats everywhere else in the world, researchers say.

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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